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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Sarah Carter
 
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I've got to clear up a load of wood which is lying around on the ground and
want to chop it up to burn when we have finally got our log burner done.

I was thinking about storing them next to a wall to maybe give extra
insulation to the house as it is single layer brick. However, have been told
that this might be a bad thing as making sure that the logs can air is a
good thing and might make the house damp. Anyone have any tips?

I'm in the UK

Cheers,

Sarah
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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Fran Higham
 
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Default Wood pile...

"Sarah Carter" wrote in message

I've got to clear up a load of wood which is lying around on the ground

and
want to chop it up to burn when we have finally got our log burner done.

I was thinking about storing them next to a wall to maybe give extra
insulation to the house as it is single layer brick. However, have been

told
that this might be a bad thing as making sure that the logs can air is a
good thing and might make the house damp. Anyone have any tips?

I'm in the UK


Hi Sarah

I don't think that the wood will do much to improve the insulation and from
the houses I do know here in a cold climate which are single skinned, they
just get worse with any sort of encouragement for damp and cold to build up.

The wood will need good air circulation to dry it out if it is still green
but then given that the Uk has a mcuh wetter climate than here I would also
suggst that you put it under cover if you can (ie under a roof rather than a
tarpaulin).


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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Sarah Carter
 
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Default Wood pile...

Fran Higham wrote in message
...

The wood will need good air circulation to dry it out if it is still green
but then given that the Uk has a mcuh wetter climate than here I would

also
suggst that you put it under cover if you can (ie under a roof rather than

a
tarpaulin).


Cheers. I'll have a look to see what I can find to build a roof from and add
it to my list of things to do, although I've started stacking it under a
large tree which might be ok.

Sarah
--



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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Janet Baraclough
 
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Default Wood pile...

The message
from "Sarah Carter" contains these words:


I've got to clear up a load of wood which is lying around on the ground and
want to chop it up to burn when we have finally got our log burner done.


I was thinking about storing them next to a wall to maybe give extra
insulation to the house as it is single layer brick. However, have been told
that this might be a bad thing as making sure that the logs can air is a
good thing and might make the house damp. Anyone have any tips?


I'm in the UK


Me too, we've just moved from a house where we kept a very big wood
supply under a roofed woodshed with 3 slatted walls and an open one.

The advice you got was right; unless the wood is under a very deep dry
eave, it will keep your wall damp and apart from the risk of structural
damage, that will cool the house rather than warm it. Also, wood needs
circulating air to season it well. If you burn it damp, or green, it
will tar up the chimney and give out less heat in the room.

You could make a shallow open fronted woodshed, with slatted walls and
back and a good overhang from a sloping roof; then stand it a few inches
forward of the wall.It will give your house a windbreak (stops heatloss
from wind cooling) and be better for the firewood.

Janet.
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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
John Wheeler
 
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On Tue, 18 Mar 2003 16:18:03 +0000, Janet Baraclough wrote:

You could make a shallow open fronted woodshed, with slatted walls and
back and a good overhang from a sloping roof; then stand it a few inches
forward of the wall.It will give your house a windbreak (stops heatloss
from wind cooling) and be better for the firewood.


Also, remember, the reduction in wind speed goes several times (depending
on the permeability of a windbreak) further than the height. So, if the
woodshed is 2 meters tall, it can easily be 2-4 meters away from the
house, which should be plenty to avoid insects travelling into the house
from the woodpile.

Also, I've had good results piling wood on top of concrete blocks turned
on their side so the wind can go through the holes in the blocks.

++JohnWheeler



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