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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
N. Thornton
 
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Default Plant positions: OK?

Hi

Can you tell me if these plants would do well in South England:

Pink leaved kiwi, on north facing wall, actinidia kolomikta. Would it
ripen OK on north?
Akebia quinata on either south of west facing wall (is that right?
afternoon sun anyway) - would it be ok? would it ripen ok? I suspect
not.

I was thinking of putting apples on the south facing wall: or would
west be OK for them? Then I could put the chocolate on the south wall.
Thanks.

Regards, NT

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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
John Wheeler
 
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Default Plant positions: OK?

I don't know much about the climate in South England, except that from
what I've heard it's a fair bit warmer than western Pennsylvania, where I
am. But I can comment on the plants.

Pink-leaved kiwi will not produce fruit, because only the male vines have
pink leaves. However, I have seen Actinidia kolomikta advertised as
"Arctic kiwi", so the female vines should produce fruit, even on the north
side of the house. (I presume the fruit would be "edible", but
"palatable" might be a whole different story.)

Akebia is listed as an invasive species in southeastern Pennsylvania, so
it should produce fruit wherever you plant it.

You definitely don't want to overly pamper apples, especially if you are
subject to late frosts. The flowers will open early and be killed off.
The west wall would be okay, but fruit trees generally do better if they
get plenty of air circulation.

Chocolate? as in Theobroma cacao? I thought that was a tropical plant. I
would definitely put that in the most protected position possible (which
might not be the south side; early-morning sun and wind protection are
important, too.)

++JohnWheeler


On Sat, 29 Mar 2003 04:35:47 +0000, N. Thornton wrote:

Hi

Can you tell me if these plants would do well in South England:

Pink leaved kiwi, on north facing wall, actinidia kolomikta. Would it
ripen OK on north?
Akebia quinata on either south of west facing wall (is that right?
afternoon sun anyway) - would it be ok? would it ripen ok? I suspect not.

I was thinking of putting apples on the south facing wall: or would west
be OK for them? Then I could put the chocolate on the south wall. Thanks.

Regards, NT




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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
N. Thornton
 
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Default Plant positions: OK?

"John Wheeler" wrote in message . ..

Thank you John.

I don't know much about the climate in South England, except that from
what I've heard it's a fair bit warmer than western Pennsylvania, where I
am. But I can comment on the plants.

Pink-leaved kiwi will not produce fruit, because only the male vines have
pink leaves.


I was planning to plant males and females together to get both.

However, I have seen Actinidia kolomikta advertised as
"Arctic kiwi", so the female vines should produce fruit, even on the north
side of the house. (I presume the fruit would be "edible", but
"palatable" might be a whole different story.)


Good point. Presumably some sun would help. I believe its capable of
excellant quality fruit, smaller than New Zealand kiwis. Actually
where its going it will get a bit of direct sun once its 6' high.


Akebia is listed as an invasive species in southeastern Pennsylvania, so
it should produce fruit wherever you plant it.


Yes, I'm told it only manages to ripen them some years tho, so I guess
it will need south facing. Akebia Quinata is the chocolate plant,
hardy too. Different plant to the famous one, similar taste.

You definitely don't want to overly pamper apples, especially if you are
subject to late frosts. The flowers will open early and be killed off.
The west wall would be okay, but fruit trees generally do better if they
get plenty of air circulation.


How would this affect ripening? Apples are generally given south walls
here. Although our winters are quite a bit milder, so are our summers.

Chocolate? as in Theobroma cacao? I thought that was a tropical plant. I
would definitely put that in the most protected position possible (which
might not be the south side; early-morning sun and wind protection are
important, too.)

++JohnWheeler



On Sat, 29 Mar 2003 04:35:47 +0000, N. Thornton wrote:

Hi

Can you tell me if these plants would do well in South England:

Pink leaved kiwi, on north facing wall, actinidia kolomikta. Would it
ripen OK on north?
Akebia quinata on either south of west facing wall (is that right?
afternoon sun anyway) - would it be ok? would it ripen ok? I suspect not.

I was thinking of putting apples on the south facing wall: or would west
be OK for them? Then I could put the chocolate on the south wall. Thanks.

Regards, NT

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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
John Wheeler
 
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Default Plant positions: OK?

On Wed, 02 Apr 2003 22:21:29 +0000, N. Thornton wrote:

"John Wheeler" wrote in message
. ..

Thank you John.

I don't know much about the climate in South England, except that from
what I've heard it's a fair bit warmer than western Pennsylvania, where
I am. But I can comment on the plants.

Pink-leaved kiwi will not produce fruit, because only the male vines
have pink leaves.


I was planning to plant males and females together to get both.

However, I have seen Actinidia kolomikta advertised as "Arctic kiwi", so
the female vines should produce fruit, even on the north side of the
house. (I presume the fruit would be "edible", but "palatable" might be
a whole different story.)


Good point. Presumably some sun would help. I believe its capable of
excellant quality fruit, smaller than New Zealand kiwis. Actually where
its going it will get a bit of direct sun once its 6' high.


Excellent thinking.

Akebia is listed as an invasive species in southeastern Pennsylvania, so
it should produce fruit wherever you plant it.


Yes, I'm told it only manages to ripen them some years tho, so I guess it
will need south facing. Akebia Quinata is the chocolate plant, hardy too.
Different plant to the famous one, similar taste.


Fascinating. I knew they had edible fruits, but I had never heard that
they taste like chocolate.

You definitely don't want to overly pamper apples, especially if you are
subject to late frosts. The flowers will open early and be killed off.
The west wall would be okay, but fruit trees generally do better if they
get plenty of air circulation.


How would this affect ripening? Apples are generally given south walls
here. Although our winters are quite a bit milder, so are our summers.


Ah, I didn't realize you had mild summers, too. That could make a big
difference. If people around you generally give apples south walls, then it
probably is better *for the apples* to do so. Then the question becomes
whether that is the optimal use for the space. If you really want akebia,
then it should still probably get the prime spot. (After all, you can
always buy apples in the store.) On the other hand, akebia is a vine, so
it should be possible to grow it in the same space as the apples, if it
doesn't overpower them. I would definitely double-check that it doesn't
become invasive in your area, though; it is becoming a real problem in the
US: http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/akqu1.htm

Best of luck.
++JohnWheeler


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Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
N. Thornton
 
Posts: n/a
Default Plant positions: OK?

"John Wheeler" wrote in message . ..
On Wed, 02 Apr 2003 22:21:29 +0000, N. Thornton wrote:



Akebia is listed as an invasive species in southeastern Pennsylvania, so
it should produce fruit wherever you plant it.


Yes, I'm told it only manages to ripen them some years tho, so I guess it
will need south facing. Akebia Quinata is the chocolate plant, hardy too.
Different plant to the famous one, similar taste.


Fascinating. I knew they had edible fruits, but I had never heard that
they taste like chocolate.

You definitely don't want to overly pamper apples, especially if you are
subject to late frosts. The flowers will open early and be killed off.
The west wall would be okay, but fruit trees generally do better if they
get plenty of air circulation.


How would this affect ripening? Apples are generally given south walls
here. Although our winters are quite a bit milder, so are our summers.


Ah, I didn't realize you had mild summers, too. That could make a big
difference. If people around you generally give apples south walls, then it
probably is better *for the apples* to do so. Then the question becomes
whether that is the optimal use for the space. If you really want akebia,
then it should still probably get the prime spot. (After all, you can
always buy apples in the store.) On the other hand, akebia is a vine, so
it should be possible to grow it in the same space as the apples, if it
doesn't overpower them. I would definitely double-check that it doesn't
become invasive in your area, though; it is becoming a real problem in the
US: http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/akqu1.htm

Best of luck.
++JohnWheeler



Thanks JOhn, good input. The apples are actually the more useful for
me, so I think I'll let akebia take the 2nd best place, where it gets
afternoon sun. Being a fast climber it will soon get full sun at the
top of the fence. That seems like a good plan to me.

Thanks, NT


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