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Old 01-12-2002, 08:50 PM
MDHJWH
 
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Default self-care gardens?

"Judanne" wrote in message . au...
Where are you?

Northern Tamania
Can we come and visit????? ;~)

Sure - but I won't move in until April of next year.
I'll most probably still be popping up in this little cyber-coven so
keep an eye on this space.

Ayn Marx

  #17   Report Post  
Old 02-12-2002, 09:52 PM
Fran Higham
 
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"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.

Ayn Marx


Love the name BTW!


  #18   Report Post  
Old 02-12-2002, 09:52 PM
Fran Higham
 
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"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.

Ayn Marx


Love the name BTW!


  #19   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2002, 11:44 AM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Fran Higham" wrote in message ...
"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.


According to the bods I purchased my new place from elderberries are
most prolific in colder climes. they should be kept moist in the
several months leading up to flowering and fed lots of seawead as
fertilizer.The later sounds odd to me as I can't imagine inland
Europeans fertilizing with seaweed for all those centuries they have
been making elderberry wine. Still it wouldn't do any harm.
The lack of uniform condition ,I'm told, can be overcome with freezing
the flowers until you have enough to make wine. A wee bit high tec for
permacultural correctness maybe ;~}

Ayn Marx
  #20   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2002, 11:44 AM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Fran Higham" wrote in message ...
"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.


According to the bods I purchased my new place from elderberries are
most prolific in colder climes. they should be kept moist in the
several months leading up to flowering and fed lots of seawead as
fertilizer.The later sounds odd to me as I can't imagine inland
Europeans fertilizing with seaweed for all those centuries they have
been making elderberry wine. Still it wouldn't do any harm.
The lack of uniform condition ,I'm told, can be overcome with freezing
the flowers until you have enough to make wine. A wee bit high tec for
permacultural correctness maybe ;~}

Ayn Marx


  #21   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Geodyne
 
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Default self-care gardens?

On Sat, 12 Oct 2002 08:45:07 +1000, "Fran Higham"
wrote:

snip Fran's insights

I have quite a few of these:
Have a think about: French sorrel, cherry tomatoes (which are a volunteer
crop each year as are all types of lettuces - the red oak leaf seems to be
particularly good for ignoring), silver beet, Mizuna, Mustard Greens,
Calendula, chives, garlic, strawberries,


I have many of these already
currrants,


Not sure they'd do well in my climate?

Salad Burnett (a very
pretty addition to any 'border' or veg garden, but seldom recognised even by
those who say they are keen gardeners), nasturtiums, mint, parsley. With
even a few of these in the garden then good salads are easy to make. I find
that the Salad Burnett gets a real caning as we like it a lot. I can send
you some French sorrel if you have trouble finding it.


Thanks for the ideas Fran, there are a few there that I've taken on
board. French sorrel was actually the first plant I planted when I
started the garden in our old rental property: some fo you may
remember that I was worried I'd killed the neighbour's elderly rabbit
when he broke in and ate the whole plant (the plant survived, the
rabbit did not, but we were never sure whether the sorrel was the
cause). I still think about the poor thing. And I still have the
plant, although it is now 8 plants all over my garden!

I've planted many of the above, as well as dill, and a numbr of chilli
bushes, as well as some elder and borage to break up the clay soil.

What I've decided to do is to purchase a number of herbs and trim them
into hedges: lemon balm, that sort of thing. We'll incorporate a
number of local plants into the backyard as well, and for the rest of
the garden I'll plant perennial flowers, such as impatiens. They'll
keep the insect life happy, and I won't feel guilty about ripiing them
out when I have the time for a more time-intensive veggie garden
again.

BTW Fran, did you ever end up getting yourself a jam pan? I've had a
big desire for one ever since that discussion.

Tara
  #22   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Fran Higham" wrote in message ...
"Geodyne" wrote in message



huge snip . .

Eeeew Elder! That is one plant that is just about impossible to kill!


Would that be as in Elderberry Flower wine? I think I've just aquired
two of the above & an 137 year old quince tree etc.

Ayn Marx

snip Snip . . . .. . . .. . .
I love dill and have got several good patches

Snippety Snippety Snippety sniff . . . . . . .
  #23   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Fran Higham
 
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"MDHJWH" wrote in message
"Fran Higham" wrote in message


Eeeew Elder! That is one plant that is just about impossible to kill!


Would that be as in Elderberry Flower wine? I think I've just aquired
two of the above & an 137 year old quince tree etc.


That's the one! But congrats on the quince tree!


  #24   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Fran Higham
 
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"Tara Deen" wrote in message

Fran (and sorry for not replying sooner, it's a mad time) does this mean
that I should be very worried that I've planted it only a few metres
from my house?


If by "it", you mean an Elder then no it won't be a problem so close to the
house. They tend to just put out lots of spindlyish (6 ft high) suckers
that (in my garden, where it lives in an extremely dry spot) dry off at the
end of the season and are good kindling the next spring. The blasted thing
just won't die though.

I'd planned to trim it to a formal shrub to shade some
SW-facing windows that get the sun on summer afternoons. And, of course,
I was dreaming of elderflower champagne and elderberry tarts....


The trouble is to catch it at the right time to do it. I dream of it too
but have never managed yet to get to the flowers when they are just right.
However, if I did get to it at the right time, its suckering habit would be
a bonus because of all the flower heads.


  #25   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Tara Deen
 
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Fran Higham wrote:

"Tara Deen" wrote in message

Fran (and sorry for not replying sooner, it's a mad time) does this mean
that I should be very worried that I've planted it only a few metres
from my house?


If by "it", you mean an Elder then no it won't be a problem so close to the
house. They tend to just put out lots of spindlyish (6 ft high) suckers
that (in my garden, where it lives in an extremely dry spot) dry off at the
end of the season and are good kindling the next spring. The blasted thing
just won't die though.

Good. That's actually the exact behaviour I'm hoping it'll exhibit. I
want it to take the brunt of the evening summer sun, die off in winter
to let the sun in (the windows are the breakfast nook attached to my
kitchen) and be unkillable, as it'll be backing a brick wall as well.
The rest of that garden is shrubs indigenous to my area.

The trouble is to catch it at the right time to do it. I dream of it too
but have never managed yet to get to the flowers when they are just right.
However, if I did get to it at the right time, its suckering habit would be
a bonus because of all the flower heads.l


I can never resist a challenge....

Oh, to update on my garden dilemma. I chose the easiest route: keep one
garden bed (with all my new fruit trees in it) alive through summer and
just let the rest of the back yard dry out until the drought is over.
The front garden is all natives with a tiny patch of lawn, and they're
happy with very little watering, even now. Next autumn, I'm going to use
indigenous plants in the backyard to make up for the loss of bush in my
area, and get the veg in around those.

Tara


  #26   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Fran Higham" wrote in message ...
"Tara Deen" wrote in message

snippety Snippety

The trouble is to catch it at the right time to do it. I dream of it too
but have never managed yet to get to the flowers when they are just right.
However, if I did get to it at the right time, its suckering habit would be
a bonus because of all the flower heads.


Why is this a problem? You aren't on the property when it flowers? Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?
Discussions with the previous owners of my new pace reveal they
bottled both Elderberry Flower Wine & Elderbarry Wine every year for
the last 27 or so.
Maybe they sit & watch & wait then pounce?
The quince tree made me buy the house! I fell so in love with the
twisted,knarled old monstrosity that they could have sold be a humpy &
I wouldn't have noticed.
When I got home & had the photos developed I discovered I had bought a
solid brick gem of a house in 100% condition.
Most of the garden that crammed English Cottage style. The remainder
is vegies & fruit trees .The soil is astonishingly fertile in itself
but has been given a boost with huge amounts of seaweed over the
decades.A well sits just outside the back door with a permanent
mineral spring flowing into it.
Think I've dropped dead & gone to heaven.Someone pinch me!

Ayn Marx
  #27   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Judanne
 
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Default self-care gardens?

Where are you? Can we come and visit????? ;~)

Judanne

"MDHJWH" wrote in message
om...
"Fran Higham" wrote in message

...
"Tara Deen" wrote in message

snippety Snippety

The trouble is to catch it at the right time to do it. I dream of it

too
but have never managed yet to get to the flowers when they are just

right.
However, if I did get to it at the right time, its suckering habit would

be
a bonus because of all the flower heads.


Why is this a problem? You aren't on the property when it flowers? Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?
Discussions with the previous owners of my new pace reveal they
bottled both Elderberry Flower Wine & Elderbarry Wine every year for
the last 27 or so.
Maybe they sit & watch & wait then pounce?
The quince tree made me buy the house! I fell so in love with the
twisted,knarled old monstrosity that they could have sold be a humpy &
I wouldn't have noticed.
When I got home & had the photos developed I discovered I had bought a
solid brick gem of a house in 100% condition.
Most of the garden that crammed English Cottage style. The remainder
is vegies & fruit trees .The soil is astonishingly fertile in itself
but has been given a boost with huge amounts of seaweed over the
decades.A well sits just outside the back door with a permanent
mineral spring flowing into it.
Think I've dropped dead & gone to heaven.Someone pinch me!

Ayn Marx



  #28   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Judanne" wrote in message . au...
Where are you?

Northern Tamania
Can we come and visit????? ;~)

Sure - but I won't move in until April of next year.
I'll most probably still be popping up in this little cyber-coven so
keep an eye on this space.

Ayn Marx
  #29   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
Fran Higham
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.

Ayn Marx


Love the name BTW!


  #30   Report Post  
Old 05-05-2003, 01:08 PM
MDHJWH
 
Posts: n/a
Default self-care gardens?

"Fran Higham" wrote in message ...
"MDHJWH" wrote in message

Why is this a problem? (snip) Too
busy?
It only flowers at midnight on the new moon on the tird day of .....?


A combination of both of these plus weather/planting conditions.

As I said, my elder is in a dry spot which also happens to be in the middle
of a built up bed of rather scratchy bushes. The flowers are plentiful but
they do not ever seem to be uniformly in good condition when I get to them.
whether this is due to dryness or because of my timing, I've never been able
to determine.


According to the bods I purchased my new place from elderberries are
most prolific in colder climes. they should be kept moist in the
several months leading up to flowering and fed lots of seawead as
fertilizer.The later sounds odd to me as I can't imagine inland
Europeans fertilizing with seaweed for all those centuries they have
been making elderberry wine. Still it wouldn't do any harm.
The lack of uniform condition ,I'm told, can be overcome with freezing
the flowers until you have enough to make wine. A wee bit high tec for
permacultural correctness maybe ;~}

Ayn Marx


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