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Old 07-09-2003, 08:23 PM
Dennis Forbes
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.

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Old 07-09-2003, 08:32 PM
Shell91
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

While I don't know what kind of tree you have or why the bees and such like
it so well, the picture of the critter on your web site looks like some kind
of hornet. You really really do not want to get stung by a hornet. One
stung my mom several years ago and we had to take her to the emergency room,
and she is not allergic to bees, etc.

Shell


"Dennis Forbes" wrote in message
m...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.



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Old 07-09-2003, 09:02 PM
P van Rijckevorsel
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

Dennis Forbes schreef
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


+ + +
It was almost unnecessary to actually see the pictures, but yes it is Tilia.
Maybe Stewart Robert Hinsley can tell you which species?

It is not the tree itself which exudes sugary solution, but the aphids.
As problems go this is a very well known one.
PvR


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Old 07-09-2003, 09:33 PM
Stewart Robert Hinsley
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

In article , Dennis
Forbes writes
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


It's a Lime, a species of Tilia. There is an American species [1], and
Bee-tree is used as a vernacular name for at least one variety of this.
However I think this is the European Small-leaved Lime (Littleleaf
Linden in American vernacular) Tilia cordata.

The flower bracts of Limes, as shown in the first picture, are
unmistakable. In most species the flowers are pendant, but in Tilia
cordata, and allied East Asian species, the flowers are borne at all
sorts of angles. In Tilia cordata the underside of the leaves usually
has a blueish cast. For my details on identification refer to my web
page - see sig. The leaves of many poplars are superficially similar to
those of limes; however poplars usually have no more than 3 veins
meeting at the base of the leaf, and limes have 5 or more. The habit of
the trees also differs.

The flowers of lime produce copious nectar, which attracts bees. The sap
that you refer to however is honeydew, the excreta of aphids. The sap
can occur at any time during the growing season, but tends to be later
in the year when aphid populations has built up. Google for Tilia aphid
control for possibilities for control. Limes are too big for techniques
useable on perennials to work, but if it's not too big, mechanically
dislodging the aphids with a water hose might reduce infestations.

[1] At one point many species (30?) of American limes were recognised,
but these have been reduced to one, very variable species.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
http://www.meden.demon.co.uk/Malvace...a/Britain.html
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Old 07-09-2003, 09:42 PM
Stewart Robert Hinsley
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

In article , P van
Rijckevorsel writes
It was almost unnecessary to actually see the pictures, but yes it is Tilia.
Maybe Stewart Robert Hinsley can tell you which species?


Your reply arrived here just as mine was leaving. I make it Tilia
cordata. I forget to stick in a link to my images online of this
species.

URL:http://www.meden.demon.co.uk/Malvace...y.html#cordata
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley


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Old 07-09-2003, 10:58 PM
Stewart Robert Hinsley
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

Resending, 'cos the original copy seems to have gone astray.

In article , Dennis
Forbes writes
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


It's a Lime, a species of Tilia. There is an American species [1], and
Bee-tree is used as a vernacular name for at least one variety of this.
However I think this is the European Small-leaved Lime (Littleleaf
Linden in American vernacular) Tilia cordata.

The flower bracts of Limes, as shown in the first picture, are
unmistakable. In most species the flowers are pendant, but in Tilia
cordata, and allied East Asian species, the flowers are borne at all
sorts of angles. In Tilia cordata the underside of the leaves usually
has a blueish cast. For my details on identification refer to my web
page - see sig. The leaves of many poplars are superficially similar to
those of limes; however poplars usually have no more than 3 veins
meeting at the base of the leaf, and limes have 5 or more. The habit of
the trees also differs.

The flowers of lime produce copious nectar, which attracts bees. The sap
that you refer to however is honeydew, the excreta of aphids. The sap
can occur at any time during the growing season, but tends to be later
in the year when aphid populations has built up. Google for Tilia aphid
control for possibilities for control. Limes are too big for techniques
useable on perennials to work, but if it's not too big, mechanically
dislodging the aphids with a water hose might reduce infestations.

[1] At one point many species (30?) of American limes were recognised,
but these have been reduced to one, very variable species.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
http://www.meden.demon.co.uk/Malvace...a/Britain.html
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Old 08-09-2003, 06:32 PM
P van Rijckevorsel
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

P van Rijckevorsel writes
It was almost unnecessary to actually see the pictures, but, yes, it is

Tilia. Maybe Stewart Robert Hinsley can tell you which species?

Stewart Robert Hinsley schreef
Your reply arrived here just as mine was leaving. I make it Tilia
cordata. I forget to stick in a link to my images online of this
species.

URL:http://www.meden.demon.co.uk/Malvace...y.html#cordata
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley


+ + +
The other day I met some bee-keepers and the topic of Tilia came up. They
also knew about research into the alleged toxicity of Tilia-honey (clearing
the tree), but added a hypothesis, namely that there was a discrepancy
between the production of honey and the spreading of an attractive smell.
They felt that Tilia still smelt strongly while honey production was
dropping off, luring in bees that it could not feed.
PvR




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Old 09-09-2003, 04:03 PM
Beecrofter
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

(Dennis Forbes) wrote in message om...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


I have seen soft bodied scale insects on basswood trees that have
rained down honeydew. It doesn't happen every year.
In flower you should be able to hear the hum of bees in this tree if
there are hives of bees nearby.
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Old 09-09-2003, 10:25 PM
isabella Pareliussen
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)


"Dennis Forbes" skrev i melding
m...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


Could it possible be a populus ? I think there is an american populus which
looks like tho one on the picture.
Isabella.



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Old 09-09-2003, 10:27 PM
isabella Pareliussen
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)


"Dennis Forbes" skrev i melding
m...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


Could it possible be a populus ? I think there is an american populus which
looks like tho one on the picture.
Isabella.





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Old 09-09-2003, 10:31 PM
isabella Pareliussen
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)


"Dennis Forbes" skrev i melding
m...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


Could it possible be a populus ? I think there is an american populus which
looks like tho one on the picture.
Isabella.



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Old 10-09-2003, 11:42 AM
Jim Elbrecht
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

(Dennis Forbes) wrote:


I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,

-snip-
I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


Thank you for posting the answer on your page. I don't know about
the tree, but I think you have the insect mis-identified.

Look at the pictures of a Yellow Jacket & a Bald Faced Hornet beside
each other at
http://www.borealforest.org/insects/insects15.htm

Close-- but the Yellow jacket has Yellow stripes, and they begin his
abdomen. Your insect is a Bald Faced Hornet. [still likely there for
the same purpose- eating insects] When the leaves drop you'll
probably see a large paper nest. Wait until a couple hard frosts &
you can bring the empty nest inside as a souvenir.

I went googling for a picture of the nest and found this page;
http://www.unexco.com/gallery/hornets.html
which says that hornet "is actually a large yellow jacket and not a
true hornet". It's been a long time since I studied entymology, so I
might stand corrected on that count.


Jim
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Old 10-09-2003, 01:32 PM
nobody
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

On Tue, 9 Sep 2003 23:03:44 +0200, "isabella Pareliussen"
wrote:


"Dennis Forbes" skrev i melding
om...
Good day.

I have a tree in the front yard of my recently purchased house, and I
was wondering if a kind arborist out there could identify the tree,
and if possible tell me if there's any way to control the sap (or to
make it less tasty), or alternately when yearly I should expect this
sap. I don't mind the sticky residue covering the lane and cars, but
the many bees it draws is a bit of a concern.

I've put several pictures at
http://www.yafla.com/~dforbes/tree/index.htm.

Thank you for reading. Have a great day.


Could it possible be a populus ? I think there is an american populus which
looks like tho one on the picture.
Isabella.


As to your insect problem... you probably have more than one insect
you are dealing with. The problem is PROBABLY not sap, but honeydew,
which is sap that has been exuded by aphids. Your tree MAY have an
aphid infestation, which is causing the rain of droplets. Are there a
lot of ants going up the tree, too? They are often found taking
advantage of the honeydew exuded by the aphids.

As to how to control... you should consult with a professional ... I
have heard of people spraying affected trees with pesticides to
control the aphids, but this can be very difficult to be effective
with tall trees.
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Old 10-09-2003, 08:43 PM
Beecrofter
 
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Default Looking for help identifying a tree, and methods to control sap (if possible)

The white faced hornet that makes the large paper ball is technically
a yellow jacket.
Hornets are old world insects.
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