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Old 12-01-2004, 02:32 PM
Phred
 
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Default gastroenteritis [and mushrooms] (was How mad cow disease may have gotten into your hamburger

In article , Oz wrote:
Roland Jonsson writes
Oz Decided to say:

What kind of gatroenteritis have increased? Is Salmonella, Yersinia
and others included, and has it's ratio changed? There is different
kind of hygien, and to strengthen one dosn't help if you ignore
another.

From memory they have all increased, some more than others.
Reporting may have something to do with it, but I doubt its that
significant.


It would be interesting to see the numbers, but I haven't the time to
look it up. I don't think many becomes sick from to old food though,
people gets scared just because it's easy to read the date on. As Calvin
said, "I don't want to eat something that might have the date of my
death on it"


Very probably.

When I take my family abroad (eg asia) we eat in hole in the wall
eateries. We do not get sick although the first visit to an area
usually brings on an upset 12 hr stomach as we acclimatise to the new
bugs.


Yes, mostly it goes well, but sometimes people get really sick, some
even dies. You might have a better immune system than others, but I
haven't seen any reaserch on that. Personally I would avoid the
filthiest ones.


Hard to tell, few are actually obviously filthy (although may be of
local construction). I tend to go for ones where there are a lot of
locals. The locals don't like getting sick either. One needs to be
careful that they really are locals because (for example) singaporeans
on holiday look very much like anyone else in s.e.asia. I made that
mistake once (in Penang), in what looked a smart restaurant (on
reflection too smart for locals) only to realise that the other diners
were all speaking singapore english. We did have a minor upset as a
result.


Some years ago I spent 3 months travelling and working in
southern rural India. I ate the food and drank the water -- but only
in "district HQ towns" for the latter -- without problems most of the
time. I did get the squirts a couple of times, but only when I
was silly enough to stay in one of those "international hotels" one
finds in the larger cities such as New Delhi and Bangalore. Out in
the sticks I had no such problems.

I put it down to the chefs in the "international hotels" not really
knowing what they were doing when it came to preparing their
"European" menus. (Or, perhaps more likely, they didn't give a rat's
when it came to preparing food for "sahibs".

Mind you, there was always the risk of getting something really nasty
in the way of a gut problem. As the Oz HC said to me before I headed
off "If you start bleeding from both ends, get a plane to Singapore."

Many places in asia cook the food in front of you and its clearly well
sterilised. I tend towards dunking my cutlery in the near boiling soup
for 60secs for obvious reasons, but this may be overkill.


I loved the way the Indians made tea at those roadside stalls -- put
the tea, milk and sugar (always plenty of sugar into a pot and boil
it up, then strain it though an "old sock" into the cups. Apart
form the "sock", a pretty sterile process. :-)

But I agree, I eat almost everything that smells and tastes good
before cooking, just be careful with mushrooms.

I identify the wild ones carefully before I eat them.


And you bloody well need to! Some are *very* difficult to
distinguish. (Mind you, if you're really familiar with the things
it's usually pretty easy -- just don't try to work from written
descriptions in your first endeavours!)

Some friends of mine became sick from eating mushrooms that were
defrosted to slowly, not bacteria but spors.

Sounds improbable.


The trouble with some mushroom species is that you're dead even before
you know you're wounded -- it just takes a while to die.


Cheers, Phred.

--
LID


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Old 12-01-2004, 03:42 PM
Oz
 
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Default gastroenteritis [and mushrooms] (was How mad cow disease may have gotten into your hamburger

Phred writes

And you bloody well need to! Some are *very* difficult to
distinguish. (Mind you, if you're really familiar with the things
it's usually pretty easy -- just don't try to work from written
descriptions in your first endeavours!)


Spot on in one.

The wild ones have (drool) just *SO* much more flavour .....

--
Oz
This post is worth absolutely nothing and is probably fallacious.
DEMON address no longer in use.
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Old 13-01-2004, 01:33 PM
Phred
 
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Default gastroenteritis [and mushrooms] (was How mad cow disease may have gotten into your hamburger

In article , Oz wrote:
Phred writes

And you bloody well need to! Some are *very* difficult to
distinguish. (Mind you, if you're really familiar with the things
it's usually pretty easy -- just don't try to work from written
descriptions in your first endeavours!)


Spot on in one.

The wild ones have (drool) just *SO* much more flavour .....


Yeah. If necessary, you can use them instead of beef. ;-)
(Pretty good *with* beef too, of course.)


Cheers, Phred.

--
LID

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Old 13-01-2004, 01:42 PM
Oz
 
Posts: n/a
Default gastroenteritis [and mushrooms] (was How mad cow disease may have gotten into your hamburger

Phred writes
In article , Oz
wrote:
Phred writes

And you bloody well need to! Some are *very* difficult to
distinguish. (Mind you, if you're really familiar with the things
it's usually pretty easy -- just don't try to work from written
descriptions in your first endeavours!)


Spot on in one.

The wild ones have (drool) just *SO* much more flavour .....


Yeah. If necessary, you can use them instead of beef. ;-)


Some are indeed very meaty, the parasols for example.
I don;t think much of the 'beefsteak fungus' though.

(Pretty good *with* beef too, of course.)


A bunch of boleti in a beef stew is WONDERFUL!

--
Oz
This post is worth absolutely nothing and is probably fallacious.
DEMON address no longer in use.


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