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Old 09-05-2004, 08:07 PM
Archimedes Plutonium
 
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Default tree with year-round purple color, not just white ash in fall color

One of the reasons I want white ash is for its Fall color of leaves with
purple. But last week I ventured down a road which had two trees of
purple leaves and I presume for all of the season and not just during
Autumn. So I ask myself the question of why bother with a white ash
whose purple color will only be for a few weeks when I should get a tree
whose leaves are purple most of the year?

I am guessing those 2 trees are maple but did not stop to take a closer
look at identification. Perhaps they were of a cherry species for I
notice that choke cherries are often very purplish leaves of color. But
those 2 were huge trees so I suspect it was not a cherry species.

And perhaps this will become a distant future trend in that hybrids of
species for color of leaves will be a hotly pursued field of employment
in the future for trees that have pretty color leaves. So that in the
future instead of amur maples giving a red brilliance for a few weeks we
have trees whose leaves are red brilliant all summer long. So genetic
engineering not only for plants for food source or insect resistant but
genetic engineering of plants for art and beauty sake.

And whereas genetic engineering of food supply culls up harsh reactions
by environmental folk, I would think that these reactionary people would
not be so bellicose over genetic engineering of trees for art and
beauty.

Archimedes Plutonium
www.archimedesplutonium.com
www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom where dots
of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies


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Old 11-05-2004, 11:02 AM
Archimedes Plutonium
 
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Default tree with year-round purple color, not just white ash in fall color

Sun, 09 May 2004 13:53:16 -0500 Archimedes Plutonium wrote:

One of the reasons I want white ash is for its Fall color of leaves with
purple. But last week I ventured down a road which had two trees of
purple leaves and I presume for all of the season and not just during
Autumn. So I ask myself the question of why bother with a white ash
whose purple color will only be for a few weeks when I should get a tree
whose leaves are purple most of the year?

I am guessing those 2 trees are maple but did not stop to take a closer
look at identification. Perhaps they were of a cherry species for I
notice that choke cherries are often very purplish leaves of color. But
those 2 were huge trees so I suspect it was not a cherry species.


(snipped)

Today I passed on the way through town to look at those purple leafed trees
and to make some attempt at identification. Sure enough they were of a
maple species. I think they are Acer platanoides or Royal Red Maple. Also
there are some plums called Newport of Prunus cerasifera with purple
leaves. And there is a bush of Prunus cistena, or purple sandcherry.

I am going to add Acer platanoides into my landscape and am going to try to
propagate via cuttings. Anyone know if Acer platanoides is susceptible to
cutting propagation. Now that would be a beautiful sight to see of rows of
amur maple mixed with platanoides of a brilliant red and brilliant purple.

At the moment I am trying to propagate Sunburst locust via cuttings. Anyone
have experience with that?

On a different note concerning concrete block gardening. I lost most of my
tomatoes by foolishly planting them in April instead of waiting to May. Two
nights of frost of just a touch below freezing was all it took. However,
some tomatoes survived inside the concrete block. The ones that survived
had not grown out of the top of the block and were near an inside wall
touching the wall.
Somehow that lent maximum protection.

So today bought another packet of tomato seed and will do that over again
and remember for future years that it pays not to plant early for the risk
is too high.

My potatoes also were frostbite but they were not killed as well as my
grape vines. But neither is inside a concrete block hole.


Archimedes Plutonium
www.archimedesplutonium.com
www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom where dots
of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies

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Old 12-05-2004, 09:04 PM
David Hershey
 
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Default tree with year-round purple color, not just white ash in fall color

There is an Fraxinus americana 'Autumn Purple', an ash that supposedly
has especially good purple fall color.

There is a book on Purpleleaf Plums by Arthur Lee Jacobson that
attempted to describe the many cultivars. There are several
purplish/reddish-leaved cultivars of Norway maple including 'Crimson
King', 'Royal Red', 'Crimson Sentry' and 'Goldsworth Purple.'

http://www.msue.msu.edu/imp/modzz/00000026.html

Other red/purplish-leaved trees include the following:

purple beech (Fagus sylvatica purpurea)
purple smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple')
purple English oak (Quercus robur 'Atropurpurea')
purple-leaved birch (Betula pendula 'Purpurea')
purpleleaf redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy')
purple filbert (Corylus maxima 'Purpurea')
red Japanese maple (Acer palmatum atropurpureum)

One purple-leaved tree goes a long way in a landscape as an accent
plant. They are often overused.

There is some genetic engineering work to develop better ornamental
plants. For example, their is a commercial effort to transfer blue
genes into flowers that lack blue shades, such as carnation and rose.
The Australian company Florigene has released several "blue" carnation
cultivars such as 'Moondust', 'Moonlite' and 'Moonshadow." However,
they are not true blue.

My Love is Like a Blue, Blue Rose
http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20030213/06

Florigene
http://www.florigene.com.au/
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Old 13-05-2004, 08:10 PM
Archimedes Plutonium
 
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Default tree with year-round purple color, not just white ash in fall color

12 May 2004 12:52:14 -0700 David Hershey wrote:

There is an Fraxinus americana 'Autumn Purple', an ash that supposedly
has especially good purple fall color.

There is a book on Purpleleaf Plums by Arthur Lee Jacobson that
attempted to describe the many cultivars. There are several
purplish/reddish-leaved cultivars of Norway maple including 'Crimson
King', 'Royal Red', 'Crimson Sentry' and 'Goldsworth Purple.'

http://www.msue.msu.edu/imp/modzz/00000026.html

Other red/purplish-leaved trees include the following:

purple beech (Fagus sylvatica purpurea)
purple smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple')
purple English oak (Quercus robur 'Atropurpurea')
purple-leaved birch (Betula pendula 'Purpurea')
purpleleaf redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy')
purple filbert (Corylus maxima 'Purpurea')
red Japanese maple (Acer palmatum atropurpureum)

One purple-leaved tree goes a long way in a landscape as an accent
plant. They are often overused.

There is some genetic engineering work to develop better ornamental
plants. For example, their is a commercial effort to transfer blue
genes into flowers that lack blue shades, such as carnation and rose.
The Australian company Florigene has released several "blue" carnation
cultivars such as 'Moondust', 'Moonlite' and 'Moonshadow." However,
they are not true blue.

My Love is Like a Blue, Blue Rose


Thanks for all the good information above. It helps save me time in
listing all the purple colors of landscaping.

I do not know if there is a newsgroup for landscape architecture, but I
am interested in the science of landscape architecture. And I believe in
rows of
plants in order for it to be "pretty or beautiful" unlike the dottyness,
here a dot there a dot placement of trees. So that when you say "one
purple..tree goes a long way..... overused". I would disagree. I am
thinking of a 2 rows of trees of about 10 per row staggered of Norway
maples Royal Red mixed with Crimson King and staggered as in a
checkerboard with Sunburst locust. So that when someone drives by and
sees 2 rows of purple staggered with gold yellow is a sight to behold.

The trouble with the profession of landscape architecture is that they do
not use mathematics of proportions such as Golden Mean of its number 1.6
so that beautiful landscape architecture must have at minimum that of
rows and lines. Every landscape architecture that has no hint of rows of
plants or trees is a ditty dotty pattern and ellicits chaos and
randomness. Whereas lines and patterns ellicit order and thus beauty.

I am formulating plans on making 2 rows of staggered purple maples with
Sunburst locust trees.

Archimedes Plutonium
www.archimedesplutonium.com
www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom where dots
of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies



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