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Old 05-08-2007, 07:50 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

Thought I'd mention, beware what you throw your fish from the yard.

I found a worm along side the pond... now the worm was a tad odd in that it
wasn't moving as fast as I thought it should, but I didn't think too much
about it. Just a moment of hesitation I should have heeded, but my arm was
already in automatic toss. I'm not sure which fish ate it.... but the next
day, one of my oldest was sitting firmly on the bottom, not interested in
eating.

Oh dear! Long story short, DH said, maybe it was something he ate, and I
remembered the worm. It took about 3 days for him to return to normal, and
all things are fine now. I'm thinking if I find a worm, I'll be soaking it
in water to clear it's gut... just in case it has traveled thru some slug
bait or other and has it in it's gut... or maybe it is just safer not to
feed worms at all, at least at my house?

I don't treat real close to the ponds, but I do put stuff on the ground, as
the earwigs, slugs, snails have been the worst I've ever seen this year.

I wonder how this stuff might affect Robins and other worm eating critters?
~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us


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Old 05-08-2007, 10:00 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 12:50:26 CST, ~ jan wrote:

Thought I'd mention, beware what you throw your fish from the yard.

I found a worm along side the pond... now the worm was a tad odd in that it
wasn't moving as fast as I thought it should, but I didn't think too much
about it. Just a moment of hesitation I should have heeded, but my arm was
already in automatic toss. I'm not sure which fish ate it.... but the next
day, one of my oldest was sitting firmly on the bottom, not interested in
eating.

Oh dear! Long story short, DH said, maybe it was something he ate, and I
remembered the worm. It took about 3 days for him to return to normal, and
all things are fine now. I'm thinking if I find a worm, I'll be soaking it
in water to clear it's gut... just in case it has traveled thru some slug
bait or other and has it in it's gut... or maybe it is just safer not to
feed worms at all, at least at my house?

I don't treat real close to the ponds, but I do put stuff on the ground, as
the earwigs, slugs, snails have been the worst I've ever seen this year.

I wonder how this stuff might affect Robins and other worm eating critters?
~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us


That's one reason I am real reluctant to use any pesticides. That
stuff has got to go somewhere. If the bugs eat the poison, other
critters may eat the bugs. If the bugs just die, other bacteria and
ants and fungus and stuff will either eat or release the poison. The
stuff that doesn't get eaten washes (somewhere) during the next rain.
It's true that I have spiders and even a small frog from time to time
in the house,
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x...khuis/Frog.jpg)
but I don't have cockroaches, ants or other "pests" that seem to
plague others. I think maybe it's my high tolerance for spiders and
other beneficial critters that most folks find yucky.
--
Galen Hekhuis
I may have mispoken

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Old 06-08-2007, 01:10 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 15:00:32 CST, Galen Hekhuis
wrote:

but I don't have cockroaches, ants or other "pests" that seem to
plague others. I think maybe it's my high tolerance for spiders and
other beneficial critters that most folks find yucky. Galen


Off topic... but, I learned in MG classes that the little jumping spider is
our friend inside. I've always tossed them outside, but apparently they eat
the cob web causing spiders. Since leaving them inside for the last several
years it has really cut down on my cleaning of the ceiling immensely! Not
to mention they're kind of cute with their fuzzy faces, verses the long
legged naked ones. ;-) ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us

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Old 06-08-2007, 04:17 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Aug 5, 6:10 pm, ~ jan wrote:
On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 15:00:32 CST, Galen Hekhuis
wrote:

but I don't have cockroaches, ants or other "pests" that seem to
plague others. I think maybe it's my high tolerance for spiders and
other beneficial critters that most folks find yucky. Galen


Off topic... but, I learned in MG classes that the little jumping spider is
our friend inside. I've always tossed them outside, but apparently they eat
the cob web causing spiders. Since leaving them inside for the last several
years it has really cut down on my cleaning of the ceiling immensely! Not
to mention they're kind of cute with their fuzzy faces, verses the long
legged naked ones. ;-) ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds:www.jjspond.us


Beware of eliminating the spiders you have! The Black Widows and
Brown recluse may move in!

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Old 06-08-2007, 04:18 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

"~ jan" wrote:

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 15:00:32 CST, Galen Hekhuis
wrote:

but I don't have cockroaches, ants or other "pests" that seem to
plague others. I think maybe it's my high tolerance for spiders and
other beneficial critters that most folks find yucky. Galen


Off topic... but, I learned in MG classes that the little jumping spider is
our friend inside. I've always tossed them outside, but apparently they eat
the cob web causing spiders. Since leaving them inside for the last several
years it has really cut down on my cleaning of the ceiling immensely! Not
to mention they're kind of cute with their fuzzy faces, verses the long
legged naked ones. ;-) ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us


Hi Jan,

I didn't know you were a MG. So am I.

San Diego Joe
4,000 - 5,000 Gallons.
Koi, Goldfish, and RES named Colombo.



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Old 06-08-2007, 04:18 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

I let them, the jumping spiders hang around until they
make the mistake of getting near, or on, MY chair.
This will not be tolerated!!
I did have one live in my delete key for a while and he
would get all ticked off if I deleted any letters. Had to
type very carefully for a while.

k :-)

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Old 06-08-2007, 04:18 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

but I do put stuff on the ground, as
the earwigs, slugs, snails have been the worst I've ever seen this year.


Hi Jan - I learned a good method of getting rid of earwigs last year from a
"yard program" on TV, after a contractor here at the time told me to watch
it - take an old newspaper and roll it up (not too tight) and tie it up with
whatever, then 'lightly' sprinkle it with a hose to dampen it and place it
where earwigs are present - when the garbage day arrives, have someone with
you to hold open a plastic bag when you pick it up (as they run out like
crazy when they feel movement) and tie it up in the bag for disposal - put
out as many as you need, until they are beat back
Gale :~)

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Old 06-08-2007, 06:20 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 21:18:50 CST, "G Pearce"
wrote:

Hi Jan - I learned a good method of getting rid of earwigs last year from a
"yard program" on TV, after a contractor here at the time told me to watch
it - take an old newspaper and roll it up (not too tight) and tie it up with
whatever, then 'lightly' sprinkle it with a hose to dampen it and place it
where earwigs are present - when the garbage day arrives, have someone with
you to hold open a plastic bag when you pick it up (as they run out like
crazy when they feel movement)


Accccccccccck~ Did I mention how they seriously creep me out? Sorry, short
of nuking them, a newspaper just won't due. ;-) Waste of good energy &
plastic. Now.... I guess I could put the pesticide inside the wet
newspaper, that might work. ~ jan



and tie it up in the bag for disposal - put
out as many as you need, until they are beat back
Gale :~)

------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us

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Old 06-08-2007, 06:21 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 21:18:00 CST, San Diego Joe wrote:

Hi Jan,

I didn't know you were a MG. So am I.

San Diego Joe


How long? I'm barely hanging on to my certification and I sure can't work
in the clinic since I went back to work. I only get the hour of the 4 hour
class/week. :-( Anyway, I signed up in 1996 when it was free, now they
charge $100, with half returned once folks put in their volunteer time.

So I;m hanging in there for now, as I do manage the 25 hour minimum
(usually more) of volunteer pay back time required each year. Plus, it is a
great group of people. How about you? ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us

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Old 06-08-2007, 02:33 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

If you don't have a companion to hold the plastic bag, you can step on
the ends of the paper to collapse them.

Jim



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Old 06-08-2007, 04:51 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Aug 5, 9:18 pm, k wrote:
I let them, the jumping spiders hang around until they
make the mistake of getting near, or on, MY chair.
This will not be tolerated!!
I did have one live in my delete key for a while and he
would get all ticked off if I deleted any letters. Had to
type very carefully for a while.

k :-


I have a lot of spiders near the pond! I feed flies to the small blue
Gill and the goldfish go for them also! So, I attract the flies to
the pond! The fish get a few that venture near the water surface!
Most I swat and feed to the fish! So, I just injure quite a few which
fly away a ways and fall down! This attracts the spiders! For the
jumpers, it is just like in Eight-legged Freaks! The jump and jump
and land on the flies! The Big black spiders under and around the
fence, I don't like; but they are not agressive!

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Old 06-08-2007, 04:51 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

On Aug 5, 9:18 pm, "G Pearce" wrote:
but I do put stuff on the ground, as

the earwigs, slugs, snails have been the worst I've ever seen this year.


Hi Jan - I learned a good method of getting rid of earwigs last year from a
"yard program" on TV, after a contractor here at the time told me to watch
it - take an old newspaper and roll it up (not too tight) and tie it up with
whatever, then 'lightly' sprinkle it with a hose to dampen it and place it
where earwigs are present - when the garbage day arrives, have someone with
you to hold open a plastic bag when you pick it up (as they run out like
crazy when they feel movement) and tie it up in the bag for disposal - put
out as many as you need, until they are beat back
Gale :~)


I will have to try this! The earwigs really are devestating to the
flowers of my Rocky Mountain Bee plants!

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Old 08-08-2007, 10:36 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

Feeding worms to the fish was always fun - I'll now be careful. I
don't use any chemicals in or around the pond or my yard - but I have
no idea what the neighbors may use. Thanks for the info.
Bonnie
NJ

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Old 09-08-2007, 02:26 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Sick fish, bad worm

"~ jan" wrote:

On Sun, 5 Aug 2007 21:18:00 CST, San Diego Joe wrote:

Hi Jan,

I didn't know you were a MG. So am I.

San Diego Joe


How long? I'm barely hanging on to my certification and I sure can't work
in the clinic since I went back to work. I only get the hour of the 4 hour
class/week. :-( Anyway, I signed up in 1996 when it was free, now they
charge $100, with half returned once folks put in their volunteer time.

So I;m hanging in there for now, as I do manage the 25 hour minimum
(usually more) of volunteer pay back time required each year. Plus, it is a
great group of people. How about you? ~ jan


Just since 2005. The first year requires 50 hrs and 25 after that. Doesn't
seem to be a problem. I think they picked me for my IT skills - I'm now in
charge of the "computer" committee, which seems to be everything that
doesn't have to do with an actual plant

We're under the auspices of the University of California.

You are right about it being a great group of people. Although I would have
to say several are just a tad on the crazy side - a lot like some ponders!


San Diego Joe
4,000 - 5,000 Gallons.
Koi, Goldfish, and RES named Colombo.

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Old 09-08-2007, 06:12 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2007 19:26:30 CST, San Diego Joe wrote:

Just since 2005. The first year requires 50 hrs and 25 after that. Doesn't
seem to be a problem. I think they picked me for my IT skills - I'm now in
charge of the "computer" committee, which seems to be everything that
doesn't have to do with an actual plant


Oh yes, once they realize you have IT skills, there goes the outdoors. ;-)

We're under the auspices of the University of California.

You are right about it being a great group of people. Although I would have
to say several are just a tad on the crazy side - a lot like some ponders!
San Diego Joe


Yup.... special rooms for growing their special plants (legal special
plants) misting systems, etc. Ponds & gardening attract the insane and make
them whole... well... at least only 1 or 2 ears of corn from a crop. ;-)
~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us



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