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Old 18-02-2010, 11:09 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Hydroponics and Ponds

There was an interesting article in today's New York Times on "aquaponics",
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/ga...gewanted=print
where the author uses "waste" water from a 150 gallon fish tank to fertilize
his plants. He's posted a YouTube video of his set up at
http://www.youtube.com/user/web4deb if you're interested. The article
describes pretty amazing production in his crops of cherry tomatoes,
lettuce, cucumbers and strawberries.



This got me to thinking. I have a bio filter falls that is planted with
mint, Louisiana Iris, Forget-me-nots and other plants, in addition to the
fiber mats and lava rock. This set up keeps my 3,000 gallon pond clear. (I
don't use any U/V filtration.) Each summer I have to remove significant
amounts of mint from the filter falls as it dams up the spillway where the
water returns to the pond. Wouldn't I be better off cultivating something
that I could use (eat) and not throw away for mulch? What if I were to put a
couple of tomato plants in my filter falls instead; or, some other food
crop?



Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



I think I'm going to try this out this year!



JB



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Old 19-02-2010, 01:03 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Hydroponics and Ponds




JB wrote:

There was an interesting article in today's New York Times on "aquaponics",
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/ga...&emc=rss&pagew
anted=print
where the author uses "waste" water from a 150 gallon fish tank to fertilize
his plants. He's posted a YouTube video of his set up at
http://www.youtube.com/user/web4deb if you're interested. The article
describes pretty amazing production in his crops of cherry tomatoes,
lettuce, cucumbers and strawberries.



This got me to thinking. I have a bio filter falls that is planted with
mint, Louisiana Iris, Forget-me-nots and other plants, in addition to the
fiber mats and lava rock. This set up keeps my 3,000 gallon pond clear. (I
don't use any U/V filtration.) Each summer I have to remove significant
amounts of mint from the filter falls as it dams up the spillway where the
water returns to the pond. Wouldn't I be better off cultivating something
that I could use (eat) and not throw away for mulch? What if I were to put a
couple of tomato plants in my filter falls instead; or, some other food
crop?



Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



I think I'm going to try this out this year!



JB


Well, the problem you would have is that water plants are built to have
their roots in water. Plants like tomatoes are not, they would "drown". It's
the same reason that rubber tree in your dentist's office does poorly when
the pot is kept in a dish full of water. You might try some of the herbs
though. Mint, as you note, does quite well.

San Diego Joe
4,000 - 5,000 Gallons.
Koi, Goldfish, and RES named Colombo.

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Old 19-02-2010, 01:03 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Hydroponics and Ponds

JB wrote:


Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



There is a big effort out here in the sunny desert to grow algae
commercially for all sorts of products including bio-fuel. Heck if we
could just harvest the algae grown in the ponds from this list, we could
all retire.

Any plant will grow w/o soil if adequately watered and fertilized. I
remember huge tomatoes being grown at Epcot w/ bare roots just hanging
in the air. A lot of "weed" is cultivated this way.

Chip

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Old 19-02-2010, 01:03 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Hydroponics and Ponds

We haven't tried farming, but we do empty the 1-2" of sludge from our
two 4 x 8 veggie filters onto the lawn. Big green! Should work fine
for your plants to grow them in the waste.

My 8 foot aquarium in my office has philadendron growing out of it.
The roots are in a 2 liter bottle. The plants run six ft above the
tank for the full length of it. They do not pull enough of the
nutrients to pull out the other filter means. It does grow really
well.

Jim

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Old 19-02-2010, 10:04 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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On Fri, 19 Feb 2010 08:03:00 EST, Joe wrote:
-snip-


Well, the problem you would have is that water plants are built to have
their roots in water. Plants like tomatoes are not, they would "drown".


Tomatoes are easily adapted to hydroponic gardens-- You have a few
choices. some folks flood them several times a day. Others grow them
in gravel and let the roots search for the water.

Here's a drip style hydro-tomato setup.
http://www.ehow.com/how_2091307_buil...to-grower.html

My 'poor man's' system that I've been playing with this winter is a 30
gallon aquarium with a few rosy reds in it- and a few Rubbermaid flats
nearby with shoplights over them.

I take a bucket of water out of my pond. I'm in NY so it needs to sit
overnight to adjust to basement temps [about 60F]. Then I vacuum
the fish tank- replace the water in the tank with pond water- and
water the plants with the dirty water.

I have some basil, parsley & chives that I like to have on hand--- and
a bunch of tender perennials that got to be the guinea pigs.
[Including a sweet potato that likes this setup a lot better than
being outside!] Next winter I'll add a cherry tomato and maybe some
cukes.

I'll probably also enlarge and automate some of the process next
winter.

Last year I just had watercress and mint as edibles in the pond-- but
I should get the veggie filters set up this year-- and they will be
veggies. Once the trees leaf out I don't have enough sun on
the pond itself for veggies-- but I'll route some water to a couple
tubs in the sun for my summertime hydo-experiments.

Those links are much appreciated.

Jim



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Old 27-02-2010, 01:08 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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I got really interested in this idea a couple of years ago, but a couple
of things put me off:

1. It seemed to be a necessity to run the project in a green house,
which I would struggle to fit into my small back garden.
2. A visit to a hydroponics shop, revealed a couple of things. The ideal
water conditions for hydroponics aren't necessarily ideal for fish. The
number of parameters which you need to measure and control makes marine
fish keeping look simple. I would want to be very careful about adding
additives to help plants in case fish are adversly affected.
3. The vast majority of hydroponics related material seems to be target
at the growing of one illegal crop, which apparently is the one of the
few industries, that Britain has gone from being a net importer to a net
exporter.

I'm not saying don't do it, but do lots of research. I'd be really
interested to here how you get on.
Peter

JB wrote:
There was an interesting article in today's New York Times on "aquaponics",
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/ga...gewanted=print
where the author uses "waste" water from a 150 gallon fish tank to fertilize
his plants. He's posted a YouTube video of his set up at
http://www.youtube.com/user/web4deb if you're interested. The article
describes pretty amazing production in his crops of cherry tomatoes,
lettuce, cucumbers and strawberries.



This got me to thinking. I have a bio filter falls that is planted with
mint, Louisiana Iris, Forget-me-nots and other plants, in addition to the
fiber mats and lava rock. This set up keeps my 3,000 gallon pond clear. (I
don't use any U/V filtration.) Each summer I have to remove significant
amounts of mint from the filter falls as it dams up the spillway where the
water returns to the pond. Wouldn't I be better off cultivating something
that I could use (eat) and not throw away for mulch? What if I were to put a
couple of tomato plants in my filter falls instead; or, some other food
crop?



Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



I think I'm going to try this out this year!



JB



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Old 27-02-2010, 05:19 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Default Hydroponics and Ponds

Peter,

My thinking at this point would be try a tomato plant or two planted in a
plastic mesh planting basket (like we use for our pond plants) with the
tomato planted in that sanitized, baked clay potting medium I've been using
for my lillies and other plants for years. I'll place it in my filter falls
where only the bottom third or so of the basket will be submerged. I won't
use anything else.

It's worth a shot and the worst that can happen is I'm out the cost of the
tomato plant.

Thanks for the feedback.

JB
"Peter" wrote in message
...
I got really interested in this idea a couple of years ago, but a couple of
things put me off:

1. It seemed to be a necessity to run the project in a green house, which
I would struggle to fit into my small back garden.
2. A visit to a hydroponics shop, revealed a couple of things. The ideal
water conditions for hydroponics aren't necessarily ideal for fish. The
number of parameters which you need to measure and control makes marine
fish keeping look simple. I would want to be very careful about adding
additives to help plants in case fish are adversly affected.
3. The vast majority of hydroponics related material seems to be target at
the growing of one illegal crop, which apparently is the one of the few
industries, that Britain has gone from being a net importer to a net
exporter.

I'm not saying don't do it, but do lots of research. I'd be really
interested to here how you get on.
Peter

JB wrote:
There was an interesting article in today's New York Times on
"aquaponics",
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/ga...gewanted=print
where the author uses "waste" water from a 150 gallon fish tank to
fertilize his plants. He's posted a YouTube video of his set up at
http://www.youtube.com/user/web4deb if you're interested. The article
describes pretty amazing production in his crops of cherry tomatoes,
lettuce, cucumbers and strawberries.



This got me to thinking. I have a bio filter falls that is planted with
mint, Louisiana Iris, Forget-me-nots and other plants, in addition to the
fiber mats and lava rock. This set up keeps my 3,000 gallon pond clear.
(I don't use any U/V filtration.) Each summer I have to remove
significant amounts of mint from the filter falls as it dams up the
spillway where the water returns to the pond. Wouldn't I be better off
cultivating something that I could use (eat) and not throw away for
mulch? What if I were to put a couple of tomato plants in my filter falls
instead; or, some other food crop?



Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



I think I'm going to try this out this year!



JB





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Old 27-02-2010, 09:49 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 08:08:22 EST, Peter
wrote:
JB wrote:
There was an interesting article in today's New York Times on "aquaponics",
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/ga...gewanted=print
where the author uses "waste" water from a 150 gallon fish tank to fertilize
his plants. He's posted a YouTube video of his set up at
http://www.youtube.com/user/web4deb if you're interested. The article
describes pretty amazing production in his crops of cherry tomatoes,
lettuce, cucumbers and strawberries.



This got me to thinking. I have a bio filter falls that is planted with
mint, Louisiana Iris, Forget-me-nots and other plants, in addition to the
fiber mats and lava rock. This set up keeps my 3,000 gallon pond clear. (I
don't use any U/V filtration.) Each summer I have to remove significant
amounts of mint from the filter falls as it dams up the spillway where the
water returns to the pond. Wouldn't I be better off cultivating something
that I could use (eat) and not throw away for mulch? What if I were to put a
couple of tomato plants in my filter falls instead; or, some other food
crop?



Has anyone else tried "farming" from their ponds?



I think I'm going to try this out this year!



JB



I got really interested in this idea a couple of years ago, but a couple
of things put me off:

1. It seemed to be a necessity to run the project in a green house,
which I would struggle to fit into my small back garden.
2. A visit to a hydroponics shop, revealed a couple of things. The ideal
water conditions for hydroponics aren't necessarily ideal for fish. The
number of parameters which you need to measure and control makes marine
fish keeping look simple. I would want to be very careful about adding
additives to help plants in case fish are adversly affected.
3. The vast majority of hydroponics related material seems to be target
at the growing of one illegal crop, which apparently is the one of the
few industries, that Britain has gone from being a net importer to a net
exporter.

I'm not saying don't do it, but do lots of research. I'd be really
interested to here how you get on.
Peter


I wouldn't worry about it too much. It's been true in my experience
that if you want to grow the absolute best er, tomatoes, with
hydroponics, you do have to fuss with a bunch of parameters, but
you'll still grow pretty good tomatoes if you don't fuss, just not as
good as if you do. If any conflicts arise, just resolve them in favor
of the fish.
..

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Old 05-03-2010, 12:04 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Here in Milwaukee we get to hear all the time about fish/plant combos due
to Will
Allens thing he's got going.
http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/fo...-power-in-an-u
rban-food-desert
he got a MacArthur Foundation “genius” fellowship award. they sell t
he food locally
and to restaurants.

I have just tucked a couple tomatoes into my veggie filter and they grow
gangbusters
BUT.... they just dont get enough sun to get a good crop of ripe tomatoes
.. I guess I
should try lettuce or maybe even peas that can crawl up the screen.
http://weloveteaching.com/mypond/changes/changes2.htm

Ingrid
Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan
on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago

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Old 09-03-2010, 01:16 AM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 19:04:42 EST, wrote:

I have just tucked a couple tomatoes into my veggie filter and they grow
gangbusters
BUT.... they just dont get enough sun to get a good crop of ripe tomatoes


How are they pollinated, don't they need bees?
~ jan (bad master gardener with shoddy memory)
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds:
www.jjspond.us



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Old 12-03-2010, 11:17 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Never fear! In addition to my pond, I raise bees.


"~ jan" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 19:04:42 EST, wrote:

I have just tucked a couple tomatoes into my veggie filter and they grow
gangbusters
BUT.... they just dont get enough sun to get a good crop of ripe tomatoes


How are they pollinated, don't they need bees?
~ jan (bad master gardener with shoddy memory)
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds:
www.jjspond.us



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Old 13-03-2010, 12:18 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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JB wrote:

Never fear! In addition to my pond, I raise bees.


Do you raise them for fun or profit? I've been contemplating a top bar hive
for my yard. I live in the city, but the back of my property abuts a canyon
and I thought I could put one back there without annoying my neighbors too
much.


San Diego Joe
4,000 - 5,000 Gallons.
Koi, Goldfish, and RES named Colombo.

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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 18:17:04 EST, "JB" wrote:

Never fear! In addition to my pond, I raise bees.


Well there ya go. Happy Tomatoes! ~ jan
------------
Zone 7a, SE Washington State
Ponds: www.jjspond.us

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Old 13-03-2010, 03:19 PM posted to rec.ponds.moderated
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Joe,

I'm a hobbyist only. Two hives are the most I've ever had. There's a topbar
hive blogger on the Internet that takes you through the entire process
they've followed. I think he's still posting. Anyway, if you haven't found
him already, search for "topbarhive" and I think that should lead you to
him. I've been surprised that my bees don't seem to be very interested in
water lilies. They're fragrant and have lots of pollen but I guess their
preference is with other plants.

Good luck.

--
"Joe" wrote in message
...



JB wrote:

Never fear! In addition to my pond, I raise bees.


Do you raise them for fun or profit? I've been contemplating a top bar
hive
for my yard. I live in the city, but the back of my property abuts a
canyon
and I thought I could put one back there without annoying my neighbors too
much.


San Diego Joe
4,000 - 5,000 Gallons.
Koi, Goldfish, and RES named Colombo.





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