#1   Report Post  
Old 14-02-2003, 10:39 PM
K30a
 
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Default rust algea


This looks like a promising web page to
check out
http://www.state.me.us/dep/rwm/whats...onbacteria.htm

good luck!
k30a

  #2   Report Post  
Old 15-02-2003, 08:39 AM
Sue Walsh
 
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Default rust algea

ESPMER (K30a) wrote in message ...
This looks like a promising web page to
check out
http://www.state.me.us/dep/rwm/whats...onbacteria.htm

good luck!
k30a


Checked out the site, but I don't think this is my problem as what
they are talking about is an orange slimmy substance on the water.
This is not on the water surface but rather like an algea growth on
the liner it's self. Also they talk about it leaching up from the
soil under streams, can't happen with the liner in. It does not
appear to be slimmy. It really looks like the short aglea that grows
on most liners but it's rusty brown not green. If I can get a sample
of it, is there any place to get it tested to see what it is exactly?
Would the county extension office test it? I looked at the FAQ's and
didn't see too much except for fish tanks with some reference to rust
colored algea on glass tanks, and they just cleaned it off(but it
always came back), I can't exactly do that too easily. Any one else
here ever have this problem in their pond? How did I get so lucky?
Any other ideas?

Sue
  #3   Report Post  
Old 15-02-2003, 03:03 PM
Peggy
 
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Default rust algea

Hi Sue - I'm not a regular follower or poster much anymore (not much spare
time) but I had the same problem last year. My pond was 2 years old when
this happened. Plants, fish were in place they even had babies last year
for the 1st time. Water quality was not an issue. But the only way I got
it up was with a shop vac with the small brushless tool used to clean floors
almost resembling an ice scraper. I even tried a rubber kitchen spatula and
it does come off in sheets if you do it gently but it was too time consuming
so resorted to the vac. As far as your river rock goes, it's scrubbing time
if it is that bad on the eyes. I know it's a type of algae or bacteria as
it gives off bubbles just like algae. It bothered me more than anything and
was the devil to take care of. I never got it all out but then from
overfeeding the fish fry developed a sweater type algae that soon covered
everything and that was more of an eyesore than the rust colored "slime"
covering on the rubber liner. It kept growing in length until I'm thinking
this is string algae. Good luck with your problem.

Peggy

"Sue Walsh" wrote in message
m...
ESPMER (K30a) wrote in message

...
This looks like a promising web page to
check out
http://www.state.me.us/dep/rwm/whats...onbacteria.htm

good luck!
k30a


Checked out the site, but I don't think this is my problem as what
they are talking about is an orange slimmy substance on the water.
This is not on the water surface but rather like an algea growth on
the liner it's self. Also they talk about it leaching up from the
soil under streams, can't happen with the liner in. It does not
appear to be slimmy. It really looks like the short aglea that grows
on most liners but it's rusty brown not green. If I can get a sample
of it, is there any place to get it tested to see what it is exactly?
Would the county extension office test it? I looked at the FAQ's and
didn't see too much except for fish tanks with some reference to rust
colored algea on glass tanks, and they just cleaned it off(but it
always came back), I can't exactly do that too easily. Any one else
here ever have this problem in their pond? How did I get so lucky?
Any other ideas?

Sue



  #5   Report Post  
Old 16-02-2003, 03:03 AM
~ jan
 
Posts: n/a
Default rust algea

This looks like a promising web page to
check out
http://www.state.me.us/dep/rwm/whats...onbacteria.htm
k30a


Interesting website K30! )

Sue Walsh replied:
Checked out the site, but I don't think this is my problem as what
they are talking about is an orange slimmy substance on the water.


Further down they talk about it settled on the bottom (Orange to red
coating on bed) but if you don't have iron in your water, I'd assume you
don't have it.

What I do think is possibly going on is green algae is growing using up the
nutrients and then dies, releases the nutrients and the process starts a
new. I had it the first year or 2 myself, a bottom drain and larger fish
that swish the stuff towards the bottom drain takes care of it now.

I think you're going to be very disappointed with ponding if you don't have
patience to "Let It Be". ;o) The only quick fix is a bottom drain/skimmer.
Chemicals are a waste of money as they'll only be a temporary fix at best.

As far as the water fall, rotate the stones, of course most of the coating
will come off and accumulate in the pond. ~ jan


See my ponds and filter design:
http://users.owt.com/jjspond/

~Keep 'em Wet!~
Tri-Cities WA Zone 7a
To e-mail see website


  #6   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2003, 01:27 AM
Sue Walsh
 
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Default rust algea

Lee,
Thanks for the local reply, I am beginning to agree with this theory,
you are the second person to say the same thing. If it is "dead"
algae and since I don't have any plants in yet (just a few bunches of
anacharis) do you think I should try brushing it off and vacuuming it
out. Can I do this without draining it, I hope? If you think that is
possible I'd give it a shot. Then I am going to plant the pond and
try to wait it out. I have gotten my hands on a few plants and about
20 bunches of anacharis, also a friend is going to give me some of her
plants. So It's a start. Have an order in to Aqua Mart which will
ship mid march and maybe more local stuff will be around before then
also. My stream seems to be growing some green string algae also,so
hopefully this will help. That's another reason why I hesitate to try
to kill the rust stuff, if it is not dead already. Water temps have
varied from 45 to 55 and I had seen green algae growing before this
rust stuff, so maybe it is "dead" algae. Again, Thanks for your
input, it's nice to get info from a simular weather area. E-mail me
if you can get a chance to take a ride and come see the project. The
Kids did a great job. I'd love to get to see yours too.

Sue W

"Lee Brouillet" wrote in message ...
Sue, you're farther north than I am, and I my algae turned colors, too: from
the cold. The water dropped to 48 degrees or so, and the algae turned from
green to a rather ugly brown (your rust color, or something else???). It's
flaking off now, being replaced by the green stuff again. I have to clean my
pre-filter every other day because of it. Are you *sure* it's "something"
and not a response to the cold?

  #7   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2003, 03:51 AM
Laura Linz
 
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Default rust algea


Kids did a great job.


Aw shucks!

"Lee Brouillet" wrote in message ...
Sue, you're farther north than I am, and I my algae turned colors, too: from
the cold. The water dropped to 48 degrees or so, and the algae turned from
green to a rather ugly brown (your rust color, or something else???). It's
flaking off now, being replaced by the green stuff again. I have to clean my
pre-filter every other day because of it. Are you *sure* it's "something"
and not a response to the cold?



Mom,
Can you send me a picture? I'd like to see if it's the same stuff that
was in my barrel garden last year. If it's indeed dying green algae,
then I definitely agree with Lee and Jan when they say leave it alone.
If it's the stuff I had though, then I'd probably try to kill it.
Cheers
Laura
  #8   Report Post  
Old 18-02-2003, 06:15 PM
Lee Brouillet
 
Posts: n/a
Default rust algea

Being as you don't have any fish or plants in there yet, I *guess* you could
get a soft push broom (a NEW one, no soaps!) and gently "sweep" the sides
(you don't want to remove the algae, only the "burnt" parts). Be prepared
for the gunk, and make sure you keep your prefilters clean. I'm just letting
mine slough off naturally as it's replaced with the new growth. My water
temp is back to the high 60's, so I'm a bit ahead of you. I, too, have a
bunch of string algae in the waterfall area. The general consensus is to
leave it there for filtering properties until my biobugs get over their
shock, but I can't WAIT to get rid of it. It's thick enough to muffle the
sounds of the waterfall, but when I remove some of the worse areas, it does
release a bunch of gunk.

Under no circumstances drain your pond: if you do, you'll be right back to
Day One. Something that drastic should be saved for something, errr,
*drastic*! The absolute most you should drain down your pond, even for heavy
cleaning, is half way. So, bottom line: if you like crawling around in
frigid water, go ahead and try brushing it off. If you'd prefer sitting on
the bank and soaking in the sun, I think it will go away by itself G (If
it doesn't show an improvement over the next 2 weeks or so, [provided no
more frosts!] then maybe it IS something else, but I think I'd wait to see.)

Thanks for the invite: if I ever venture that far "north", I'll let you
know. Are you going to AFKAPS in Orlando, end of March?

Lee


"Sue Walsh" wrote in message
om...
Lee,
Thanks for the local reply, I am beginning to agree with this theory,
you are the second person to say the same thing. If it is "dead"
algae and since I don't have any plants in yet (just a few bunches of
anacharis) do you think I should try brushing it off and vacuuming it
out. Can I do this without draining it, I hope? If you think that is
possible I'd give it a shot. Then I am going to plant the pond and
try to wait it out. I have gotten my hands on a few plants and about
20 bunches of anacharis, also a friend is going to give me some of her
plants. So It's a start. Have an order in to Aqua Mart which will
ship mid march and maybe more local stuff will be around before then
also. My stream seems to be growing some green string algae also,so
hopefully this will help. That's another reason why I hesitate to try
to kill the rust stuff, if it is not dead already. Water temps have
varied from 45 to 55 and I had seen green algae growing before this
rust stuff, so maybe it is "dead" algae. Again, Thanks for your
input, it's nice to get info from a simular weather area. E-mail me
if you can get a chance to take a ride and come see the project. The
Kids did a great job. I'd love to get to see yours too.

Sue W

"Lee Brouillet" wrote in message

...
Sue, you're farther north than I am, and I my algae turned colors, too:

from
the cold. The water dropped to 48 degrees or so, and the algae turned

from
green to a rather ugly brown (your rust color, or something else???).

It's
flaking off now, being replaced by the green stuff again. I have to

clean my
pre-filter every other day because of it. Are you *sure* it's

"something"
and not a response to the cold?





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