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Old 11-06-2003, 03:08 PM
Fred
 
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Default Yet another algae question...

I continually read the algae threads and recently got confused.

I'm not worried about the pea soup stuff - it comes and then goes. I've
learned to be patient.

However, my floater roots and to some extent my anacharis get covered with
"stuff", including string algae, that causes them to float to the surface.
That is, the roots of the hyacinth are often splayed out and floating on the
surface rather than dangling down in the water. Is this normal? Is it a
bad sign?

TIA,

Fred


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Old 11-06-2003, 03:32 PM
Sam Hopkins
 
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Default Yet another algae question...

Fred,

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing. People in
this group consider all algae bad all the time but that's because it
interfers with all of us viewing our fishes. If algae was transparent I'd
doubt there'd ever be much discussion about algae.

Sam

"Fred" wrote in message
...
I continually read the algae threads and recently got confused.

I'm not worried about the pea soup stuff - it comes and then goes. I've
learned to be patient.

However, my floater roots and to some extent my anacharis get covered with
"stuff", including string algae, that causes them to float to the surface.
That is, the roots of the hyacinth are often splayed out and floating on

the
surface rather than dangling down in the water. Is this normal? Is it a
bad sign?

TIA,

Fred



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Old 11-06-2003, 03:56 PM
BenignVanilla
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

"Sam Hopkins" wrote in message
.. .
Fred,

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that

it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing. People

in
this group consider all algae bad all the time but that's because it
interfers with all of us viewing our fishes. If algae was transparent I'd
doubt there'd ever be much discussion about algae.


Here, here...I have a feeder tank in my home office. It has been green solid
for months...the fish seem to love it. I tossed a pl*co in there and he will
soon be walking around the room he is getting so big. Algea are our friends.

BV.


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Old 11-06-2003, 04:32 PM
Sam Hopkins
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

Oh I highly agree with you about the benefits on a food level. I promote
algae in my big pond (6 acres) so that the chain of life continues and my
fish get fed. But in an aquarium or small pond where the point is to see the
fish algae makes us hate it.

"BenignVanilla" m wrote in
message ...
"Sam Hopkins" wrote in message
.. .
Fred,

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that

it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing

plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing. People

in
this group consider all algae bad all the time but that's because it
interfers with all of us viewing our fishes. If algae was transparent

I'd
doubt there'd ever be much discussion about algae.


Here, here...I have a feeder tank in my home office. It has been green

solid
for months...the fish seem to love it. I tossed a pl*co in there and he

will
soon be walking around the room he is getting so big. Algea are our

friends.

BV.




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Old 11-06-2003, 09:08 PM
Moontanman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

I agree that most algae is good for a pond or an aquarium but the string algae
i have been trying to fight is just ruining my pond.It forms hugs mats under
water engulfing other plants and even entangling fish. what can it do?

Moon
remove nospam from e-mail to send to me, I grow trees in aquariums like bonsai.
I breed dwarf crayfish, great for planted community tanks. If you can get me a
shovelnose sturgeon fingerling (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) no wild caught
please, contact me


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Old 12-06-2003, 02:20 AM
Fred
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

This is all fine, and I agree in principle. My question, though, involves
the floating roots. Is this typical behavior with algae and floaters, or is
it a sign that the pond may be choking?

F

On 6/11/03 7:29 AM, in article ,
"Sam Hopkins" wrote:

Fred,

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing. People in
this group consider all algae bad all the time but that's because it
interfers with all of us viewing our fishes. If algae was transparent I'd
doubt there'd ever be much discussion about algae.

Sam

"Fred" wrote in message
...
I continually read the algae threads and recently got confused.

I'm not worried about the pea soup stuff - it comes and then goes. I've
learned to be patient.

However, my floater roots and to some extent my anacharis get covered with
"stuff", including string algae, that causes them to float to the surface.
That is, the roots of the hyacinth are often splayed out and floating on

the
surface rather than dangling down in the water. Is this normal? Is it a
bad sign?

TIA,

Fred




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Old 12-06-2003, 06:44 AM
zookeeper
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

Fred, it may mean that you have a nutrient level that is too high,
causing the algae to grow faster than the plants. You can add more
plants or change out some water, decrease or stop feeding, remove some
fish (if you have too high a load), decrease sunlight, etc. You can use
many of the same types for reducing pea soup algae as for string algae.

With string algae, you can also twirl in around a stick and remove
"globs" of it that way. You can probably pull it off the hyacinth roots
as well so it doesn't cause the roots to float to the surface. As long
as the leaves get sunshine, the plants will be fine.

If I were you, I would stop feeding the fish for now. All goldfish and
koi (carp) can survive for months without supplemental food. They are
constantly eating algae, bugs, larvae and some plants. They will do just
fine without extras until you can get the algae down a bit.

Do you have any underwater plants (anacharis, hornwort, etc.)? They will
"soak" up a lot of nutrients from the water, or add several bunches of
watercress (from produce section at grocery store). Don't plant the
anacharis or watercress, just float in the pond or place in shallow pots
with gravel to anchor it in place. Watercress would be a "marginal"
plant, but the anacharis / hornwort is submerged. HTH
--
Kathy B, zookeeper
3500gal pond, 13 pond pigs
Oregon

Fred wrote:
... My question, though, involves
the floating roots. Is this typical behavior with algae and floaters, or is
it a sign that the pond may be choking?


On 6/11/03 7:29 AM, in article ,
"Sam Hopkins" wrote:

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing ...

"Fred" wrote in message


However, my floater roots and to some extent my anacharis get covered with
"stuff", including string algae, that causes them to float to the surface.
That is, the roots of the hyacinth are often splayed out and floating ...


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Old 12-06-2003, 02:44 PM
Chester Deja
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

I have a new large 35' x 55' pond and I started having major string
algae early this year after the winter thaw. I added barley straw to
the pond and within 3 weeks all the string algae was gone and the
water cleared up. The water was crystal clear down to about 3.5 feet
of the 5 foot depth until I had the bright idea to take the barley
straw halfway out for a long weekend when I was gone because my huge
pond looked too clean. When I got back my pond was pea soup and to
this day it still has not gotten as clear as it was. Ug!

I got my bale at wholesale prices at:

http://www.naturalsolutionsetc.com/

because it came complete with bags and leader string and was cheap
compared to elsewhere I looked. The bale they sent me will last my
pond 2 or 3 years - stored in the dry basement.

The stuff works and it is natural. It works by the decay of the
barley straw slow time releases Hydrogen Perodixe into the water
killing the alge. Barley straw works the best for the least amount of
straw.

Rick

ospam (Moontanman) wrote in message ...
I agree that most algae is good for a pond or an aquarium but the string algae
i have been trying to fight is just ruining my pond.It forms hugs mats under
water engulfing other plants and even entangling fish. what can it do?

Moon
remove nospam from e-mail to send to me, I grow trees in aquariums like bonsai.
I breed dwarf crayfish, great for planted community tanks. If you can get me a
shovelnose sturgeon fingerling (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) no wild caught
please, contact me

  #9   Report Post  
Old 12-06-2003, 02:56 PM
Sam Hopkins
 
Posts: n/a
Default Yet another algae question...

If your plants arent dying you're fine.

"Fred" wrote in message
...
This is all fine, and I agree in principle. My question, though, involves
the floating roots. Is this typical behavior with algae and floaters, or

is
it a sign that the pond may be choking?

F

On 6/11/03 7:29 AM, in article

,
"Sam Hopkins" wrote:

Fred,

Algae is only bad if it's in such a large concentration that

it
risks starving your fish of oxygen at night or if it risks killing

plants
because it engulfs them and prevents them from photosynthesizing. People

in
this group consider all algae bad all the time but that's because it
interfers with all of us viewing our fishes. If algae was transparent

I'd
doubt there'd ever be much discussion about algae.

Sam

"Fred" wrote in message
...
I continually read the algae threads and recently got confused.

I'm not worried about the pea soup stuff - it comes and then goes. I've
learned to be patient.

However, my floater roots and to some extent my anacharis get covered

with
"stuff", including string algae, that causes them to float to the

surface.
That is, the roots of the hyacinth are often splayed out and floating

on
the
surface rather than dangling down in the water. Is this normal? Is it

a
bad sign?

TIA,

Fred








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