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Old 09-09-2003, 04:53 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine. They look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed this on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it? Joann




  #2   Report Post  
Old 09-09-2003, 05:08 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine. They

look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed this

on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann





  #3   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2003, 02:16 AM
RichToyBox
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke. There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots

and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins

and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case

in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine. They

look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann







  #4   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2003, 02:18 AM
RichToyBox
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke. There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots

and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins

and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case

in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine. They

look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann







  #5   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2003, 04:32 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Yes Rich, but the second paragraph states-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So maybe they are healing from something.

Joann

"RichToyBox" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed

to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke. There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots

and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins

and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine.

They
look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the

black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of

the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann











  #6   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2003, 04:33 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Yes Rich, but the second paragraph states-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So maybe they are healing from something.

Joann

"RichToyBox" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed

to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke. There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots

and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins

and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine.

They
look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the

black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of

the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann









  #7   Report Post  
Old 10-09-2003, 04:45 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

Yes Rich, but the second paragraph states-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So maybe they are healing from something.

Joann

"RichToyBox" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed

to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke. There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black dots

and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins

and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it

something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine.

They
look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF

that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the

black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of

the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it?

Joann









  #8   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2003, 12:21 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

no idea. call Jo Ann. 1-251-649-4790

"FBCS" wrote:

Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine. They look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed this on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black GF that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this it? Joann





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List
http://puregold.aquaria.net/
www.drsolo.com
Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other
compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the
endorsements or recommendations I make.
  #9   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2003, 03:19 AM
Tom La Bron
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

So Jo Ann,

Test for ammonia and/or nitrites. Rule that out. If they readings are up
you may have your cause. If you are worried about Parasitism's do a gill
scrape and look under a microscope for bad bugs. If the area is healing it
will blacken, but you need to figure out what caused it.

Tom L.L.
===========================
"FBCS" wrote in message
news
Yes Rich, but the second paragraph states-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma. Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So maybe they are healing from something.

Joann

"RichToyBox" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not supposed

to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke.

There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black

dots
and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of

evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high turnover

or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is

rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded manipulated

reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the

fins
and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the

fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening

is
not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it
something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine.

They
look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never noticed

this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly black

GF
that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the

black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some of

the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this

it?
Joann











  #10   Report Post  
Old 11-09-2003, 07:09 AM
FBCS
 
Posts: n/a
Default Calling dr solo, Calling dr solo

I have watched, readings seem normal my PH runs high all the time. I do
water changes weekly.
The black color is disappearing. Your right I have concidered parasites but
I don't know if I have it in me to do (scraping) that. I had changed
bio-filters mid summer and had to wait for it to process. Water was looking
like the Potomac River (muddy). It is clearing now, not he best but things
are finally processing properly. I had taken off the UV to get the bio
filter going, I am going to turn it back on now. I will keep an eye on them.
If it is parasites do I treat the whole pond? Thanks Joann
"Tom La Bron" wrote in message
...
So Jo Ann,

Test for ammonia and/or nitrites. Rule that out. If they readings are up
you may have your cause. If you are worried about Parasitism's do a gill
scrape and look under a microscope for bad bugs. If the area is healing

it
will blacken, but you need to figure out what caused it.

Tom L.L.
===========================
"FBCS" wrote in message
news
Yes Rich, but the second paragraph states-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the fins and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe

parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The blackening is

not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So maybe they are healing from something.

Joann

"RichToyBox" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Joann,

Shimi's are black markings on kohaku koi, usually, that are not

supposed
to
be there. It is apparently caused, per some, by the sanke coming out

in
them. Makes for a good kohaku into a very poor excuse for a sanke.

There
are methods of surgically removing shimi's.
--
RichToyBox
http://www.geocities.com/richtoybox/pondintro.html


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
I just came across this at Koivet, is it a possibility?
Second paragraph - they have not seemed to be sick. Joann
snip
Black Spots Appearing
Some little black spots are called Shimi. This is an

unfortunate
genetic defect in some fish wherein a Kohaku gets some little black

dots
and
they're suddenly a worthless Sanke. There is also a growing body of
evidence
that suggests the condition may be common in water with high

turnover
or
exposure to caustic irritants like Chlorine. Case in point: Shimi is
rarely
noted in natural greenwater ponds but is common in crowded

manipulated
reuse
systems.
Another type of blackening is a generalized type wherein the

fins
and
body may develop a blackening change from chronic or caustic trauma.

Case
in
Point: Fish are badly ammonia burned by a filtration failure or
inadequacy --- A week later, after water quality is restored, the

fish
develop blackened areas, called a Melanophore Migration. Severe
parasitisms
can later cause blackening as the skin starts to heal. The

blackening
is
not
permanent, but may remain for two to four weeks before subsiding.


"FBCS" wrote in message
...
Ingrid help, anybody else can jump right on in with suggestions.

I noticed some of my GF have black in their gills (inside). Is it
something
to be concerned about. I have tested the water and all seems fine.

They
look
fine none are wacking out. None of my Koi have this. I never

noticed
this
on
them before last week. What made me notice was one of my ugly

black
GF
that
I thought was gone showed up a pretty red gold then I noticed the

black
inside the gills thought it was his coloring then I noticed some

of
the
others had the same thing. I have read about gill damage, is this

it?
Joann















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