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Old 13-03-2003, 07:44 PM
Bob Bauer
 
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Default How To Deal With Low Budget Bare Root Roses

On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 21:43:32 -0500 (EST), wrote:

Lowes has got them in this town,at 6.75.Lots of varieties



Well now that I know you are buying them from Lowes and not Sexton, I
will give my 2 cents worth on the quality.

Sexton is one of about 10 or so companies around Tyler, Texas that
grow roses for the low end resale trade. The biggest one is Certified
Roses. All of these companies tend to cut costs wherever they can.
And they are NOTORIOUS for selling roses that are infected with Rose
Mosaic Virus. They flaty don't care either.
your roses but will cause them in most cases to be less vigorous in
health and bloom production.

That said, the price is right. So why not give a few a chance. Just
watch out. I have many of these rescue cases growing in my garden
today. I also have many of these puppies infected with RMS, so one
CAN put up with it.

Be sure when you buy these bagged bare root roses, that you:
1) Get ones that have big healthy looking thick green (and not
wrinkled or brown) canes.
2) Make sure they are still dormant. That is don't buy any that
have leaves growing on them or buds that are over 1/2 inch long.
3) Immediately take them home remove them from the bag and discard
all of the sawdust that they are packed in, then soak them in a bucket
of water that covers all the roots for 1 day. Boy do they need it.
4) Plant them NOT in the ground, but in a 3 gallon nursery pots with
potting soil
5) Keep them in the sun outside and water them regularly till they
leaf out and bloom and only then plant them in the ground. Make sure
at this time that you don't disturb the root ball that has developed
in the pot (this is easy).

Using the above principles, you can enable these poorly treated, badly
packaged and barely surviving roses back into garden shape.

Many people refer to these roses as 'hack roots'. A term that really
fits what they are. They are called this because in order to fit
easily into the bags the roots have beed brutally hacked off to 1/2 to
1/4 or less of their original length.

The primary purpose of these roses in the market is turn them over as
quickly as possible and get them out the door. Any thought or
responsibility by the people who grow and sell these roses has
completely ended the second you have handed over your cash at the
store. Nothing after that point matters to these folks, so keep this
in mind: They couldn't care less if your rose lives or dies. Caveat
Emptor

These low budget growers truly are the bottom feeders of the rose
world.

Editorial opinions provided by:
Bob Bauer
Zone 6 in Salt Lake City
http://www.rose-roses.com/



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Old 13-03-2003, 08:08 PM
JimS.
 
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Default How To Deal With Low Budget Bare Root Roses

"Bob Bauer" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 21:43:32 -0500 (EST), wrote:

Be sure when you buy these bagged bare root roses, that you:
1) Get ones that have big healthy looking thick green (and not
wrinkled or brown) canes.
2) Make sure they are still dormant. That is don't buy any that
have leaves growing on them or buds that are over 1/2 inch long.


edit

Editorial opinions provided by:
Bob Bauer
Zone 6 in Salt Lake City
http://www.rose-roses.com/

Bob,
Thanks for all this detail. I am courious about one thing- #2 above. Why
do we avoid one that's broken dormancy? I've apparently guessed this all
wrong-- I 've been looking for ones with bud eyes all over them, thinking
they must be really strong specimins to be thriving in spite of how they've
been treated. So I have been looking for packs that are "rarin' to go".
What's wrong about that assumption?

thanks

JimS.
Seattle


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Old 13-03-2003, 11:33 PM
Bob Bauer
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Deal With Low Budget Bare Root Roses

Jim S.asked:

... Why
do we avoid one that's broken dormancy? I've apparently guessed this all
wrong-- I 've been looking for ones with bud eyes all over them, thinking
they must be really strong specimins to be thriving in spite of how they've
been treated. So I have been looking for packs that are "rarin' to go".
What's wrong about that assumption?


Fully dormant is a good thing when it comes to bare root rose plants.

Having lots of bulging bud eyes is also a good thing. But actual
leaf buds over 1/4 to 1/2 inch long indicate the presence of fine
white 'root hairs' forming from the old roots.

When you remove the bare root from its packing medium, (and make no
mistake about this, it is NOT soil that surrounds the bare roots), the
little roots break off and the plant is not able to support the
foliage that is developing. The rose buds will not get enough water
and they will dry up. The buds then fall off and the rose is set back
a bit before setting new buds. The more 'leafed out' the rose is
when it is in its bare root bag, the worse this problem is. A fully
leafed out bare root rose in a bag is a recipe for disaster. I'm not
saying it won't survive, but you had better really know what you are
doing to keep it alive.

Fully dormant roses (as long as the canes are smooth green and
healthy), will perform much better after they have been planted. They
are much more forgiving.

The rose bush only has a certain amount of stored sugars in its roots
and stems. Any depletion of this resource sets the rose's ability to
'leaf out' back to some degree.

Never plant the sawdust packing medium used for shipping bare roots
with the rose. This is uncomposted wood chips and sawdust, and will
only deplete nitrogen from the soil as it decomposes over the
years.... and I do mean years.

Bob Bauer
Zone 6 in Salt Lake City
http://www.rose-roses.com/




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Old 28-10-2009, 12:34 AM
Registered User
 
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What great info! I am a newbie, and my homeowner's association has a limited budget for landscaping. We are thinking of going this route, so thanks for the info. Good to know. http://tnnursery.net


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Bauer View Post
On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 21:43:32 -0500 (EST), wrote:

Lowes has got them in this town,at 6.75.Lots of varieties



Well now that I know you are buying them from Lowes and not Sexton, I
will give my 2 cents worth on the quality.

Sexton is one of about 10 or so companies around Tyler, Texas that
grow roses for the low end resale trade. The biggest one is Certified
Roses. All of these companies tend to cut costs wherever they can.
And they are NOTORIOUS for selling roses that are infected with Rose
Mosaic Virus. They flaty don't care either.
your roses but will cause them in most cases to be less vigorous in
health and bloom production.

That said, the price is right. So why not give a few a chance. Just
watch out. I have many of these rescue cases growing in my garden
today. I also have many of these puppies infected with RMS, so one
CAN put up with it.

Be sure when you buy these bagged bare root roses, that you:
1) Get ones that have big healthy looking thick green (and not
wrinkled or brown) canes.
2) Make sure they are still dormant. That is don't buy any that
have leaves growing on them or buds that are over 1/2 inch long.
3) Immediately take them home remove them from the bag and discard
all of the sawdust that they are packed in, then soak them in a bucket
of water that covers all the roots for 1 day. Boy do they need it.
4) Plant them NOT in the ground, but in a 3 gallon nursery pots with
potting soil
5) Keep them in the sun outside and water them regularly till they
leaf out and bloom and only then plant them in the ground. Make sure
at this time that you don't disturb the root ball that has developed
in the pot (this is easy).

Using the above principles, you can enable these poorly treated, badly
packaged and barely surviving roses back into garden shape.

Many people refer to these roses as 'hack roots'. A term that really
fits what they are. They are called this because in order to fit
easily into the bags the roots have beed brutally hacked off to 1/2 to
1/4 or less of their original length.

The primary purpose of these roses in the market is turn them over as
quickly as possible and get them out the door. Any thought or
responsibility by the people who grow and sell these roses has
completely ended the second you have handed over your cash at the
store. Nothing after that point matters to these folks, so keep this
in mind: They couldn't care less if your rose lives or dies. Caveat
Emptor

These low budget growers truly are the bottom feeders of the rose
world.

Editorial opinions provided by:
Bob Bauer
Zone 6 in Salt Lake City
http://www.rose-roses.com/


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