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Old 22-03-2003, 06:08 PM
Cass
 
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Default Fish Emulsion.

Huskies4all wrote:

In article [email protected], says...
Mill's Magic and with my Alaskan Fish Emulsion and the Alfalfa
mixed with the iron chelate and so forth I am sure they will look
like roses on steroids


Hello, I was wondering if Fish Emulsion was made from the actual fish
themselves or from their manure. My family owns a trout/sturgeon
hatchery, and I have an unlimited supply of either.


Fish emulsion is made from fish themselves, with some processing.
Somewhere on a State of Alaska website is directions for homemade fish
emulsion involving soaking fish collars in a 50 gallon barrel for 10 -
14 days. Of course, considering how that smells, you might have to stay
in a motel for the last 7.

Here are involved instructions from GardenWeb:
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/o...041031662.html

What makes it good for roses?


That is an interesting question. Animal byproducts can be used to
produce nitrogen fertilizers: blood meal is the key example. I think
the allure of fish emulsion is that it is organnic and there might just
be a smig of fish oil in there that, if you dump it over the top of the
rose, acts like horticultural oil.

The advertising for one fish emulsion outfit states: "Neptune's Harvest
is an organic fertilizer made from fresh North Atlantic fish.* It is
made by a unique cold process that protects the vitamins, amino
acids, enzymes and growth hormones.**It also contains all the micro and
macro nutrients naturally found in fish.* The nitrogen and other
nutrients are chelated, so they are readily available for plants
consumption. Unlike fish emulsions, Neptune's Harvest retains the fish
proteins and oils and has no unpleasant odor.*" Another description
is: "It is produced using a cold process, employing enzymes (natural
biological catalysts) which break down fish, or fish frames (the part
left over after the fillet is removed) to simpler protein complexes.
This process is called hydrolysis. No synthetic materials are mixed
into the fish hydrolysate, and the only manipulation the product
undergoes is grinding. This process yeilds a stable, nonoderous, liquid
fertilizer that is an easy to use, safe product. No inorganic nitrogen
is added to the product at all. "
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Old 23-03-2003, 02:56 AM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default Fish Emulsion.

In Huskies4all wrote:
Hello, I was wondering if Fish Emulsion was made from the actual fish
themselves or from their manure.


Fish themselves, or waste parts of fish. It varies. One product I've
seen (Charlie Carp) uses whole fish that are harvested as a pest an then
turned to good use.


What makes it good for roses?


The fish food chain works down to seaweed and other plant matter.
Seaweed in turn contains minute amounts of nearly every element in the
periodic table - gold included.

It might be a 'hit and miss' kind of analysis, but there's something in
seaweed and fish emulsion that roses like. If it's enzyme/hormone based,
great. If it's a certain effect from a trace element, that great too.
Someone will cut their PhD on the issue one day, no doubt :-)
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Old 24-03-2003, 04:56 AM
JimS.
 
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Default Fish Emulsion.

"Huskies4all" wrote in message
. ..
In article ,
says...
Fish emulsion is made from fish themselves, with some processing.
Somewhere on a State of Alaska website is directions for homemade fish
emulsion involving soaking fish collars in a 50 gallon barrel for 10 -
14 days. Of course, considering how that smells, you might have to stay
in a motel for the last 7.


LOL! I'm used to it, to some point. I haven't lived on the hatchery for
about 8 years now, so it's a bit of a shock to the nose at first when I
do visit, but trust me, I have firsthand knowledge of how dead fish
smell. P.U. I may have to raid the "mort" pits.

I wonder how the manure would do. I might have to try and add some to
compost, or some such thing. I know that some farmers around here (fish
capital of the US) do use the liquid fish manure on fields, though most
use dairy manure. It's usually applied in the fall and left to sit all
winter.

Thanks for the links...will check it out.
CJ


One advantage of the ready-made fish emulsion, it hardly smells. I don't
know how they do it, but it doesn't have an overwhelming odor. Once you've
diluted it and watered your roses with it, you can't smell it at all. Plus,
it's really cheap. It's less than $10 a gallon around here, and that will
last you a LONG time-- hardly worth all the mess if do-it-yourself. But
one other "fringe benefit"...if you have pets, keep the container out of
their reach. I doubt it's dangerous, but my cat does seem to think the
stuff is his very own version of Hershey's syrup. bleh

JimS.
Seattle




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