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Dave_s 02-11-2006 05:50 PM

Rose in trouble
 
A favorite rose of mine that I've had for many years, is in trouble.
The rose has stopped producing any new canes with blossoms.
Canes are dying and more may die soon. A lot of new canes are being
created but they are all at ground level, below the graft, I think.
I think this new growth are suckers, not new blossom bearing canes.

Where can I send jpg pictures so someone can advise me if any of this
new growth is not suckers? IF they are all suckers, how can I cause the
rose to produce canes above the graft? Should I remove all of the sucker
growth? I live near Los Angeles in Southern Calif in San Fernando Valley.

Thank you for any help.

Dave_s

Snooze[_1_] 02-11-2006 06:07 PM

Rose in trouble
 
"Dave_s" wrote in message
...
A favorite rose of mine that I've had for many years, is in trouble.
The rose has stopped producing any new canes with blossoms.
Canes are dying and more may die soon. A lot of new canes are being
created but they are all at ground level, below the graft, I think.
I think this new growth are suckers, not new blossom bearing canes.

Where can I send jpg pictures so someone can advise me if any of this new
growth is not suckers? IF they are all suckers, how can I cause the
rose to produce canes above the graft? Should I remove all of the sucker
growth? I live near Los Angeles in Southern Calif in San Fernando Valley.


If there are any existing canes from the desirable rose, use it to create an
own-root clone. Using this method:
http://www.rdrop.com/~paul/hulse.html

Otherwise if the graft has died, you'll have to dig it out and replace it
with a new similar rose. That's why grafted roses are considered to be
temporary roses, with an expected lifespan of about 10 years.

-S




jtill 02-11-2006 08:47 PM

Rose in trouble
 
Snooze, that is a great site you recommended. I often want to root a
rose and have had only small success, this should help.
Joe T


Snooze wrote:
"Dave_s" wrote in message
...
A favorite rose of mine that I've had for many years, is in trouble.
The rose has stopped producing any new canes with blossoms.
Canes are dying and more may die soon. A lot of new canes are being
created but they are all at ground level, below the graft, I think.
I think this new growth are suckers, not new blossom bearing canes.

Where can I send jpg pictures so someone can advise me if any of this new
growth is not suckers? IF they are all suckers, how can I cause the
rose to produce canes above the graft? Should I remove all of the sucker
growth? I live near Los Angeles in Southern Calif in San Fernando Valley.


If there are any existing canes from the desirable rose, use it to create an
own-root clone. Using this method:
http://www.rdrop.com/~paul/hulse.html

Otherwise if the graft has died, you'll have to dig it out and replace it
with a new similar rose. That's why grafted roses are considered to be
temporary roses, with an expected lifespan of about 10 years.

-S



Martin H. Eastburn 03-11-2006 01:39 AM

Rose in trouble
 
We had graft bud roses last 17 years in a wooden pot. It almost died when we
got a hard freeze - but it was dormant and we had a camping heater and small tent
over it and another plant. It was an odd year that one.

We lived in the coastal mountains of Ca - several miles 'uphill and East' of Santa Cruz.

I suspect the suckers from the root plant might be starving the grafted one.
If the rose is still living above the graft - sample the roses when cutting off the
root stock - it might be a good rose but not one that sales - perhaps an old one in
the family line.

We have had roses for many years, now trying to learn more about them ourselves.

Martin
Martin H. Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
NRA LOH & Endowment Member
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
http://lufkinced.com/


jtill wrote:
Snooze, that is a great site you recommended. I often want to root a
rose and have had only small success, this should help.
Joe T


Snooze wrote:

"Dave_s" wrote in message
...

A favorite rose of mine that I've had for many years, is in trouble.
The rose has stopped producing any new canes with blossoms.
Canes are dying and more may die soon. A lot of new canes are being
created but they are all at ground level, below the graft, I think.
I think this new growth are suckers, not new blossom bearing canes.

Where can I send jpg pictures so someone can advise me if any of this new
growth is not suckers? IF they are all suckers, how can I cause the
rose to produce canes above the graft? Should I remove all of the sucker
growth? I live near Los Angeles in Southern Calif in San Fernando Valley.


If there are any existing canes from the desirable rose, use it to create an
own-root clone. Using this method:
http://www.rdrop.com/~paul/hulse.html

Otherwise if the graft has died, you'll have to dig it out and replace it
with a new similar rose. That's why grafted roses are considered to be
temporary roses, with an expected lifespan of about 10 years.

-S




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Gail Futoran[_1_] 03-11-2006 03:28 PM

Rose in trouble
 
"Dave_s" wrote in message
...
A favorite rose of mine that I've had for many years, is in trouble.
The rose has stopped producing any new canes with blossoms.
Canes are dying and more may die soon. A lot of new canes are being
created but they are all at ground level, below the graft, I think.
I think this new growth are suckers, not new blossom bearing canes.

Where can I send jpg pictures so someone can advise me if any of this new
growth is not suckers? IF they are all suckers, how can I cause the
rose to produce canes above the graft? Should I remove all of the sucker
growth? I live near Los Angeles in Southern Calif in San Fernando Valley.

Thank you for any help.

Dave_s


(1) Anything growing from *below* the graft (bud union) is from the root
stock and should be removed all the way back to the source. Letting those
grow will kill off the top, desirable part (called the scion).

(2) An application of epsom salts in the soil around the rose is a common
remedy to encourage basel breaks (new cane growth). You might also rough up
the bud union a bit with a knife or steel brush. Don't overdo! The purpose
is to give openings to basel breaks in the otherwise tough bark covered bud
union.

(3) It might be too late to save the rose. If the top part (scion) has died
or is almost dead, it's probably a wasted effort. If you really like the
rose and know which variety it is, plan to buy a new one for the spring.

(4) Note that some roses, especially minis and old garden roses, are grown
on their own roots - i.e., NOT grafted - so ALL new growth is part of the
desirable rose. I'm guessing your rose is a modern, grafted rose, hence the
problem you've observed.

Gail
near San Antonio TX USA Zone 8




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