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Old 22-03-2008, 09:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4" thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison





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Old 23-03-2008, 12:50 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 99
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the origin of
most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I know, a
non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to develop new
basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut back the old wood,
which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait until
after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming possible, then
remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I would cut back some,
but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare sticks! Put some Epson salt
(about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon would be good) to help promote new
basal breaks. Next year, do the same thing, cut back 50 % for the remaining
old wood, until, after several years, you've turned over tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison





----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
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Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---



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Old 23-03-2008, 01:07 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 4
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

Thanks Jeffrey,
Some did say that March was the best time since the bush is still "sleeping"
Any thoughts there?
By 1/3 I meant 1/3 of all canes--right to the ground
And yes---it is a non-repeater
Thanks again

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the origin
of most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I know, a
non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to develop new
basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut back the old
wood, which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait until
after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming possible, then
remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I would cut back
some, but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare sticks! Put some
Epson salt (about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon would be good) to help
promote new basal breaks. Next year, do the same thing, cut back 50 % for
the remaining old wood, until, after several years, you've turned over
tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison






----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
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---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
  #4   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2008, 01:53 AM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 99
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

Sorry for that poorly worded message, I hate it when I hit the send button
too soon.

When you prune it all depends on if you want any blooms this year. If you
really want to move the plant along, trim it now. But if you do, you'll
loose the blooms from the old wood you cut away. In general, you don't
prune non repeaters until after they bloom, as they bloom on old wood, so
cutting any way will reduce the cane available for blooming. Sometimes its
worth losing a year of blooms, and if that's the case, go for it now. It
the long run, it won't make a big difference. Just be sure to feed and
water it to promote cane development, and try the Epson salts.

Best Regards

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jeffrey,
Some did say that March was the best time since the bush is still
"sleeping"
Any thoughts there?
By 1/3 I meant 1/3 of all canes--right to the ground
And yes---it is a non-repeater
Thanks again

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the origin
of most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I know, a
non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to develop new
basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut back the old
wood, which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait until
after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming possible, then
remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I would cut back
some, but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare sticks! Put some
Epson salt (about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon would be good) to help
promote new basal breaks. Next year, do the same thing, cut back 50 %
for the remaining old wood, until, after several years, you've turned
over tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison






----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000
Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---



  #5   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2008, 01:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 4
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

Thanks again,
Maybe I'll do both...cut back some of the scragglier canes that don't do too
much anyway now and 40-50% after bloom. I assume the Epson salts are
applied in a solution. Is one application enough, or is there a schedule?
There also seems to be a pest invasion after bloom. Little green worms
about 1/4 inch long on leaf bottoms.
Any ideas for greenest yet effective control there?
--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Sorry for that poorly worded message, I hate it when I hit the send button
too soon.

When you prune it all depends on if you want any blooms this year. If you
really want to move the plant along, trim it now. But if you do, you'll
loose the blooms from the old wood you cut away. In general, you don't
prune non repeaters until after they bloom, as they bloom on old wood, so
cutting any way will reduce the cane available for blooming. Sometimes
its worth losing a year of blooms, and if that's the case, go for it now.
It the long run, it won't make a big difference. Just be sure to feed and
water it to promote cane development, and try the Epson salts.

Best Regards

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jeffrey,
Some did say that March was the best time since the bush is still
"sleeping"
Any thoughts there?
By 1/3 I meant 1/3 of all canes--right to the ground
And yes---it is a non-repeater
Thanks again

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the origin
of most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I know, a
non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to develop
new basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut back the
old wood, which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait
until after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming
possible, then remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I
would cut back some, but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare
sticks! Put some Epson salt (about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon would
be good) to help promote new basal breaks. Next year, do the same
thing, cut back 50 % for the remaining old wood, until, after several
years, you've turned over tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison






----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000
Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---








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---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---


  #6   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2008, 03:27 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 99
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

I just spread the Epson's salt on the ground and scratch it in, although I
see no reason why you couldn't put it in water. I do it just once a year on
roses I want to promote basal breaks. Some people apply it annually as a
matter of course.

The little green guys sound like sawflies' larvae to me. I've made nicotine
tea (a nod to Jerry Baker) to kill them, although I bet insecticidal soap or
neem oil would do the trick as well. All these methods require direct
contact and can be stressful to the plant if it is not well watered and/or
it is too warm out. I often apply the produce early in the morning, then
return in a few hours and wash it off. It takes a couple of applications to
clear them out. I never used BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) but I know people
who have and say it is very effective as well and does not require direct
contact with the little devils.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_thuringiensis

Good Luck

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5

(Hey Texas, we have 6 inches of snow and more coming!)

"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks again,
Maybe I'll do both...cut back some of the scragglier canes that don't do
too much anyway now and 40-50% after bloom. I assume the Epson salts are
applied in a solution. Is one application enough, or is there a schedule?
There also seems to be a pest invasion after bloom. Little green worms
about 1/4 inch long on leaf bottoms.
Any ideas for greenest yet effective control there?
--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Sorry for that poorly worded message, I hate it when I hit the send
button too soon.

When you prune it all depends on if you want any blooms this year. If
you really want to move the plant along, trim it now. But if you do,
you'll loose the blooms from the old wood you cut away. In general, you
don't prune non repeaters until after they bloom, as they bloom on old
wood, so cutting any way will reduce the cane available for blooming.
Sometimes its worth losing a year of blooms, and if that's the case, go
for it now. It the long run, it won't make a big difference. Just be
sure to feed and water it to promote cane development, and try the Epson
salts.

Best Regards

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jeffrey,
Some did say that March was the best time since the bush is still
"sleeping"
Any thoughts there?
By 1/3 I meant 1/3 of all canes--right to the ground
And yes---it is a non-repeater
Thanks again

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the
origin of most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I
know, a non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to
develop new basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut
back the old wood, which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait
until after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming
possible, then remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I
would cut back some, but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare
sticks! Put some Epson salt (about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon
would be good) to help promote new basal breaks. Next year, do the
same thing, cut back 50 % for the remaining old wood, until, after
several years, you've turned over tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the
rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison






----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000
Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---








----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
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Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---



  #7   Report Post  
Old 23-03-2008, 04:42 PM posted to rec.gardens.roses
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 4
Default Pruning Harison's Yellow

Thanks again!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison


"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
...
I just spread the Epson's salt on the ground and scratch it in, although I
see no reason why you couldn't put it in water. I do it just once a year
on roses I want to promote basal breaks. Some people apply it annually as
a matter of course.

The little green guys sound like sawflies' larvae to me. I've made
nicotine tea (a nod to Jerry Baker) to kill them, although I bet
insecticidal soap or neem oil would do the trick as well. All these
methods require direct contact and can be stressful to the plant if it is
not well watered and/or it is too warm out. I often apply the produce
early in the morning, then return in a few hours and wash it off. It
takes a couple of applications to clear them out. I never used BT
(Bacillus thuringiensis) but I know people who have and say it is very
effective as well and does not require direct contact with the little
devils. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_thuringiensis

Good Luck

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5

(Hey Texas, we have 6 inches of snow and more coming!)

"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks again,
Maybe I'll do both...cut back some of the scragglier canes that don't do
too much anyway now and 40-50% after bloom. I assume the Epson salts are
applied in a solution. Is one application enough, or is there a
schedule?
There also seems to be a pest invasion after bloom. Little green worms
about 1/4 inch long on leaf bottoms.
Any ideas for greenest yet effective control there?
--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Sorry for that poorly worded message, I hate it when I hit the send
button too soon.

When you prune it all depends on if you want any blooms this year. If
you really want to move the plant along, trim it now. But if you do,
you'll loose the blooms from the old wood you cut away. In general, you
don't prune non repeaters until after they bloom, as they bloom on old
wood, so cutting any way will reduce the cane available for blooming.
Sometimes its worth losing a year of blooms, and if that's the case, go
for it now. It the long run, it won't make a big difference. Just be
sure to feed and water it to promote cane development, and try the Epson
salts.

Best Regards

Jeff, Southeast Michigan, Zone 5


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jeffrey,
Some did say that March was the best time since the bush is still
"sleeping"
Any thoughts there?
By 1/3 I meant 1/3 of all canes--right to the ground
And yes---it is a non-repeater
Thanks again

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison

"Jeffrey L. Kline" wrote in message
et...
Harison's Yellow comes from the Rosa foetida class, which are the
origin of most modern yellow roses. Very cool. It is, as far as I
know, a non-repeater, which often blooms on old wood. If you want to
develop new basal breaks, (canes from the base) old will need to cut
back the old wood, which may limit the bloom for a year.

Unless you don't care if you get any blooms this year, I would wait
until after it blooms this year, so you can get all to blooming
possible, then remove 50% of the old wood, to the ground. The rest I
would cut back some, but keep foliage, so you don't end up with bare
sticks! Put some Epson salt (about 1/4 cup) around the base (soon
would be good) to help promote new basal breaks. Next year, do the
same thing, cut back 50 % for the remaining old wood, until, after
several years, you've turned over tall of the canes.

The cut 1/3 stuff is more for hybrid teas. I agree, new


"Richard Harison" wrote in message
...
I have a 17 year old Harison's Yellow which stands about 5' high.
Problem: all the growth is at the top 1' leaving 4' canes, some 3/4"
thick.
I would like to encourage new growth from new canes, so that the
plant
appears denser
Some say cut 1/3 or so back to the ground
Some say new canes will not bloom (at least in first year)
Some saw they do not respond well to pruning at all--leave it alone
Most who favor pruning say late winter is the time to do it
Can anyone shed some light on this? Thanks

P.S. You are not seeing things, a am a direct descendant of the
rose's
breeder
I know more of its history than cultivation!

--
All the Best,
Richard Harison






----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000
Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---







----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000
Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---








----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000 Newsgroups
---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---


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