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Old 18-07-2003, 10:07 PM
James Curts
 
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Default White powdery mildew

I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers. I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this rose?

Thank you

Jim



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Old 19-07-2003, 01:42 AM
elfa
 
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Default White powdery mildew

In article [email protected], "James says...

I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers. I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this rose?

Thank you

Jim


Below is what the Petaluma Rose Company says about it:

Powdery Mildew looks like a white dusting on rose leaves. It is controlled by
Orthenex. The organic method is 1T baking soda, 1T vinegar, 1 T vegetable oil to
a gallon of water. Other good sprays are neem oil, horticultural oils or ultra
fine oil (spray on cool days).

I've used the organic method, neem oil method and am now trying Orthenex (it was
a gift). All seemed to work for me. I'm in a climate that is hot and has NO
rain from May to October (zone 9) and it's currently 94 degrees as I write this.

elfa

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Old 19-07-2003, 04:22 AM
Cass
 
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Default White powdery mildew

In article [email protected], James Curts
wrote:

I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers. I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this rose?


An expensive but very effective maybe organic method is called Erase.
It is made from jojoba oil and will have a dramatic and immediate
effect of PM. Unfortunately, it doesn't last long. If you want to use
an organic approach, I recommend it highly. Sorry it's so expensive,
but a quart will last a long time.
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Old 19-07-2003, 02:52 PM
Tim Tompkins
 
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Default White powdery mildew

Powerdy Mildew is a fungal disease and with all of the fungal diseases
specific to roses, PREVENTION is the best method.

Once the leaves are affected you can 'kill' the spores, however it will not
go away from the affected leaves.
The strategy is to stop it and prevent further occurances by regular
preventative treatment.

For a single rose bush an aerosol spary is probably the most cost effective
solution, I believe that you can get Orthenex in an aerosol spray can from
most garden centers. The better fungicides are expensive and probably out
of the question for a single bush. Orthenex is a combination of insecticide
and fungicide in a single product.

A word of caution, Othenex contains triforine, this is a VERY HAZARDOUS
chemical, you MUST follow the directions on the label and wear protective
clothing:
long sleeves, long pants, gloves and at least a dust mask.

The 'organic' methods are a viable option, however if you live in an
alkaline area, DON'T use an alkali (baking soda) on the bush. It just
increases the pH problem you already have.

Tim

"James Curts" wrote in message
news[email protected]
I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers.

I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some

off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this

rose?

Thank you

Jim




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Old 19-07-2003, 06:42 PM
James Curts
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew

I appreciate the help folks and from your answers I am sure I can make my
rose more comfortable, productive and attractive.

Jim


"James Curts" wrote in message
newsQ[email protected]
I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers.

I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some

off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this

rose?

Thank you

Jim






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Old 20-07-2003, 12:02 AM
Anne Lurie
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew

Jim,

I just re-read your initial post, and I was just wondering what the "off the
shelf stuff which seemed to work" is? I would think this might have some
bearing on what to do next.

Anne Lurie
Raleigh, NC





"James Curts" wrote in message
news[email protected]
I have one rose. Not special rose, just a small thorny thing, but an old
buddy. Every Spring it suffers from white powdery mildew and I try various
things on it which may or may not works well. This Spring I was gone a lot
and it suffered to the point it did not provide the first set of flowers.

I
finally got time with it and trimmed back severely and treated with some

off
the shelf stuff which seemed to work.

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this

rose?

Thank you

Jim




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Old 20-07-2003, 02:22 AM
Scopata Fuori
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew


"James Curts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I appreciate the help folks and from your answers I am sure I can make my
rose more comfortable, productive and attractive.


You could get it some friends, to start with. A nice floribunda, to keep it
company, perhaps? A choice Austin, or perhaps a handful of minis at its
feet?

I admire your restraint.

One rose.

sigh


Scopata Fuori



"Bad Cat!"



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Old 20-07-2003, 04:42 AM
Charles Perry
 
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Default White powdery mildew



James Curts wrote:

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this rose?


I have some Nearly Wild bushes that had a persistant case of mildew two years
running. I sprayed with everthing I could find and kept the damage down to
curled and dusty looking leaves and the occaisional dried up bud, but nothing
cured the problem. Last Fall I sprayed with lime sulfer after the plants went
dormant. So far the plants are clean this year with just the normal 7 to ten
day Funginex program. Early on, in this case, meant the prior Fall,

Regards,

Charles

--
Charles Perry
Reply to:

** A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand **


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Old 20-07-2003, 01:12 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default White powdery mildew

In Tim Tompkins wrote:
A word of caution, Othenex contains triforine, this is a VERY
HAZARDOUS chemical, you MUST follow the directions on the label and
wear protective clothing: long sleeves, long pants, gloves and at
least a dust mask.


BS (and no, that's not short for black spot!). If Orthenex is harmful
then it's not because of the triforine component - probably more from
the insecticide in it.

Triforine has almost no safety warnings or concerns. You can buy it as
a concentrate or as a ready made trigger pack.

Having said that, I've found triforine only mildly beneficial on mildew.

The best preventative I know is foliar feeding, especially with seaweed
emulsion. The best remedy for me has turned out to be 4 weekly sprays
of one part whole milk to 5 parts water.

And DON'T trim the affected foliage. Cure it instead!
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Old 20-07-2003, 06:43 PM
James Curts
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew


"Scopata Fuori" wrote in message
...

"James Curts" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I appreciate the help folks and from your answers I am sure I can make

my
rose more comfortable, productive and attractive.


You could get it some friends, to start with. A nice floribunda, to keep

it
company, perhaps? A choice Austin, or perhaps a handful of minis at its
feet?

I admire your restraint.

One rose.


Just as I like it. Only got one woman too.

Jim




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Old 20-07-2003, 06:53 PM
James Curts
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew


"Anne Lurie" wrote in message
. com...
Jim,

I just re-read your initial post, and I was just wondering what the "off

the
shelf stuff which seemed to work" is? I would think this might have some
bearing on what to do next.

Anne Lurie
Raleigh, NC



Spectacide Immunox. Oh, ......... well, I never heard of it either. But
the girl in Lowe's swore on a pile of hat boxes it would do the job. I
trimmed the plant back to where the leaves were only slightly affected and
sprayed the dickens out of them one time and voila', I now have a great,
productive rose bush again.

Jim


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Old 20-07-2003, 06:53 PM
James Curts
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew


"Charles Perry" wrote in message
...


James Curts wrote:

What do I use early on before serious infestation occurs to help this

rose?

I have some Nearly Wild bushes that had a persistant case of mildew two

years
running. I sprayed with everthing I could find and kept the damage down

to
curled and dusty looking leaves and the occaisional dried up bud, but

nothing
cured the problem. Last Fall I sprayed with lime sulfer after the plants

went
dormant. So far the plants are clean this year with just the normal 7 to

ten
day Funginex program. Early on, in this case, meant the prior Fall,

Regards,

Charles


Again, Thanks for all the great ideas. I think I'll try just a little of
each one just to be sure.

Jim


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Old 20-07-2003, 07:22 PM
Tim Tompkins
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew

It IS the triforine, read the label!

"Triforine is a "restricted use" pesticide (RUP) with an EPA toxicity
classification of I (highly toxic). Check with specific state regulations
for local restrictions which may apply. Products containing triforine must
bear the Signal Word "Danger" on their label."

See:

http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles...orine-ext.html

"Daniel Hanna" wrote in message
home.com.au...
In Tim Tompkins wrote:
A word of caution, Othenex contains triforine, this is a VERY
HAZARDOUS chemical, you MUST follow the directions on the label and
wear protective clothing: long sleeves, long pants, gloves and at
least a dust mask.


BS (and no, that's not short for black spot!). If Orthenex is harmful
then it's not because of the triforine component - probably more from
the insecticide in it.

Triforine has almost no safety warnings or concerns. You can buy it as
a concentrate or as a ready made trigger pack.

Having said that, I've found triforine only mildly beneficial on mildew.

The best preventative I know is foliar feeding, especially with seaweed
emulsion. The best remedy for me has turned out to be 4 weekly sprays
of one part whole milk to 5 parts water.

And DON'T trim the affected foliage. Cure it instead!



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Old 20-07-2003, 10:59 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew

In Tim Tompkins wrote:
"Triforine is a "restricted use" pesticide (RUP) with an EPA toxicity
classification of I (highly toxic). Check with specific state
regulations for local restrictions which may apply. Products
containing triforine must bear the Signal Word "Danger" on their label.
"


So much for labels. Read the text, Tim! Has it killed anyone? Caused
cancer, perhaps? Maybe some birth defects or mutations? No? Perhaps
some soil persistence issues, then? Or maybe it accumulates in the
human body over time, then? No?

Triforine doesn't even kill aphids, Tim.

Now read http://www.roseshawaii.org/msds/orthenex.htm and see what it
says. Bingo, the dangerous part of this combination product is acephate.
It can poison a foetus and cause organ toxicity like other anti-
cholinesterase (organophosphate) chemicals. Even then it's pretty minor
league, compared to others in common garden use. Try looking up
dimethoate or diazinon for a real scare.
  #15   Report Post  
Old 21-07-2003, 06:52 PM
Cass
 
Posts: n/a
Default White powdery mildew

In article .com.au,
Daniel Hanna wrote:

In Tim Tompkins wrote:
"Triforine is a "restricted use" pesticide (RUP) with an EPA toxicity
classification of I (highly toxic). Check with specific state
regulations for local restrictions which may apply. Products
containing triforine must bear the Signal Word "Danger" on their label.
"


So much for labels. Read the text, Tim! Has it killed anyone? Caused
cancer, perhaps? Maybe some birth defects or mutations? No? Perhaps
some soil persistence issues, then? Or maybe it accumulates in the
human body over time, then? No?

Triforine doesn't even kill aphids, Tim.

Now read http://www.roseshawaii.org/msds/orthenex.htm and see what it
says. Bingo, the dangerous part of this combination product is acephate.
It can poison a foetus and cause organ toxicity like other anti-
cholinesterase (organophosphate) chemicals. Even then it's pretty minor
league, compared to others in common garden use. Try looking up
dimethoate or diazinon for a real scare.


You're putting too fine point on it, Daniel. MSDS in the US requires
labeling for " inert ingredients [that] may be hazardous chemicals,
as defined by the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR
1910.1200). " So even if you are right that Triforine itself is not
hazardous, the *formulation* has the DANGER label because it can cause
permanent damage to the eyes and blindness. We have no access to
triforine without the accompanying dangerous inert ingredient.

The label for Triforine EC states:

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
Acute Toxicity (Primary Routes of Exposure)
*****Eye: This substance is a severe eye irritant and could cause
permanent damage to your eyes and blindness. The degree of the injury
will depend on the amount of material that gets into the eye and the
speed and thoroughness of the first aid treatment. Signs and symptoms
may include pain, tears, swelling, redness, and blurred vision.*****

In the UK:
http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/pn33/pn33p3.htm

They don't know what has caused the *permanent corneal damage*, whether
any one of the components or the combination. The point is:

**Animal tests show severe eye and skin irritancy**
Toxicity data on the Roseclear concentrate was submitted to the
Pesticides Safety Directorate (PSD) of MAFF in April 1995 and included
studies on skin and eye irritancy. The studies, using the concentrated
product (the form in which it is sold), on eye irritancy caused most
concern. The corneas of test animals were severely damaged, resulting
in the permanent clouding of vision, indicating that Roseclear is an
extremely severe eye irritant, and should be classified as 'Risk of
Serious Damage to Eyes'. In the skin irritation study, the concentrated
product was applied directly to skin for four hours. The* severe
effects which followed indicate that the product is an extreme skin
irritant.

It more useful to know the followng from
http://www.rosemania.com/Chemical_Spray_Safety.htm:

"The most toxic pesticides carry the word DANGER on the label, are
listed as highly toxic and are classified by the Environmental
Protection Agency as Category I pesticides. Based on lethality
information, it would only take ingestion of a few drops of a liquid or
about 3.5 grams (remember that there are 454 grams per pound) of a
solid to kill a 150 lb man. Category I pesticides with this lethality
potential can only be applied by licensed applicators, and are not
available for general use by the home gardener. However, some
pesticides available to the home gardener are listed as Category I
pesticides based on their ability to produce severe skin and/or eye
damage. These pesticides include: *Orthenex,* Vendex, Isotox, Mavrik
2E, Captan dust or powder, *Triforine EC, * *Lime Sulfur and Copper
Sulfate (99%+)*. (emphasis added)"


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