Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 18-08-2003, 01:42 PM
ScoobyRCP
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose

I have a spot in my front garden where I have a couple 4ft plantsthat are too
close together. I would like to move them another foot apart but obviously do
not want to do so until safe. My thinking is that both are to close and that
is what makes both bushes susceptible to fungal diseases.
So, when to move them? Late fall or early spring. The latter is a much wetter
time for me (Louisville) so I think I would have a limited window to play with,
and would likely have to move and mulch over the canes in order to be safe
with late frosts.

Any ideas for me?

This mail is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and
grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way are to
be considered flaws or defects.




  #2   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 06:42 PM
Zack Lau
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose


"ScoobyRCP" wrote in message
...

So, when to move them? Late fall or early spring. The latter is a much

wetter
time for me (Louisville) so I think I would have a limited window to play

with,
and would likely have to move and mulch over the canes in order to be

safe
with late frosts.


Wouldn't it be easiest to move them in the early spring, after the canes
have been cut back?

Has anyone tried winter mulching with styrofoam peanuts used in packing?
Not only is styrofoam an excellent insulator, but shouldn't compost the
plants
if it gets too warm.

Zachary Lau W1VT


  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 10:12 PM
Anne Lurie
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose

Zack, how do you plan to make the styrofoam peanuts stay put??? Even the
slightest breeze would have them all over the neighborhood, I'd think.

Sorry, I didn't understand the part about "composting the plants" unless you
meant that the plants could die if the weather got too hot.

Anne Lurie
Raleigh, NC



"Zack Lau" wrote in message
...
Has anyone tried winter mulching with styrofoam peanuts used in packing?
Not only is styrofoam an excellent insulator, but shouldn't compost the
plants
if it gets too warm.

Zachary Lau W1VT




  #4   Report Post  
Old 21-08-2003, 01:32 PM
Zack Lau
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose


"Anne Lurie" wrote in message
m...
Zack, how do you plan to make the styrofoam peanuts stay put??? Even the
slightest breeze would have them all over the neighborhood, I'd think.


I was thinking wrapping the roses with gunnysack and filling in the air
space with
peanuts for more insulation.

Sorry, I didn't understand the part about "composting the plants" unless

you
meant that the plants could die if the weather got too hot.


I've heard that mulching the plants with leaves can be a bad idea when
the weather gets unseasonably warm during the winter--"composting the
plants."

I think roses get adapted to winter--we only lost one rose that had survived
a
previous winter. The newly planted roses will get more protection this year

Zack Lau W1VT



  #5   Report Post  
Old 21-08-2003, 06:02 PM
Cass
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose

In article , Zack Lau
wrote:

"ScoobyRCP" wrote in message
...

So, when to move them? Late fall or early spring. The latter is a
much wetter time for me (Louisville) so I think I would have a
limited window to play with, and would likely have to move and
mulch over the canes in order to be safe with late frosts.


Wouldn't it be easiest to move them in the early spring, after the canes
have been cut back?


Sorry, I'm not paying attention. Which zone are we talking about?

If it isn't colder than say zone 6 or 7, you can move them (a) in early
October, after cool weather makes them go dormant. You will essentially
be engaging in fall bareroot planting. This is not something I do here
in Zone 9, as I don't like bareroot roses, but it works especially well
where the winter gets cold and stays cold, like in Canada; or, more
commonly, (b) whenever spring pruning season is in your zone, which is
the same time you will be preparing for spring bareroot planting.

In both case, you need to have the holes already amended and prepared.
You will also need to cut the rose back to about 15 inches and remove
all the really old canes. You are essentially creating a bareroot rose
in your own garden. You must balance the top of the plant with the
reduced size of the root mass you are able to manage to move.

Many people worry about fall "pruning" inducing new growth, but this is
a much more drastic kind of action than topping, and the roses should
remain dormant, assuming you don't have a steady run of 75 degree
weather after you do it. If that is a possible weather pattern because
you live in a mild weather zone, make the move in the middle of winter.

Last winter I moved 7 roses this way. The harder I cut back the canes,
even of the climbers, the better they look this year. In fact, both of
my Westerlands, which happily produces 8 foot canes, are 5 feet tall
and 8 feet wide. Eden aka Pierre de Ronsard, has produced an 8 foot
climbing cane and a lot of growth to 4 feet. I didn't cut it back hard
but should have (it was an experiment). Sunsprite, a smaller plant,
floribunda, revelled in the hard pruning is looks better than it ever
looked in its life. Joseph's Coat is still in a 10 gallon pot doing
fine, plenty of 5 foot canes, which is about what I can expect in a
pot.


  #6   Report Post  
Old 22-08-2003, 09:02 PM
Unique Too
 
Posts: n/a
Default transplanting or moving established rose

"Zack Lau" writes:

I was thinking wrapping the roses with gunnysack and filling in the air
space with
peanuts for more insulation.


Zack,

Try wetting some of the peanuts before you fill your bags. In order to be more
envionmentaly friendly many of them are not plastic any longer. Now they are
made of a starch that disappears when wet.

Julie


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Moving house and transplanting Pear tree update 3 as requested NikV United Kingdom 5 31-05-2006 11:42 AM
Moving house - transplanting pear tree NikV United Kingdom 12 11-05-2006 09:05 PM
Moving large, established shrubs Austin Longhorn Texas 6 21-08-2005 08:20 PM
transplanting established bush effi Lawns 5 03-08-2004 04:24 PM
moving established plant mike vandyke Roses 2 01-06-2004 05:05 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:15 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017