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Old 13-11-2003, 10:02 PM
dave weil
 
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Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.

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Old 14-11-2003, 03:02 AM
Shiva
 
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Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

dave weil wrote:

Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.



Dave, this is just sickening. That is unmistakably
Rose Rosette Disease or "Witch's Broom" as you
mentioned. There is a great deal of information
on this at Gardenweb, you can do a search. I think you
have to get it out of there and burn it, and I am
pretty sure your other roses may be in danger.

Do you have any multiflora around? Do you know what
it looks like? I have mistaken it for blackberry--which
is in the same family. It makes masses of sweet-smelling,
tiny white blooms. It is the rose that carries this
mite-born disease. I'm so sorry you have this in
your nice garden, Dave.

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Old 14-11-2003, 04:02 AM
dave weil
 
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Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 18:25:10 -0500 (EST), "Shiva"
wrote:

dave weil wrote:

Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.



Dave, this is just sickening. That is unmistakably
Rose Rosette Disease or "Witch's Broom" as you
mentioned. There is a great deal of information
on this at Gardenweb, you can do a search. I think you
have to get it out of there and burn it, and I am
pretty sure your other roses may be in danger.

Do you have any multiflora around? Do you know what
it looks like? I have mistaken it for blackberry--which
is in the same family. It makes masses of sweet-smelling,
tiny white blooms. It is the rose that carries this
mite-born disease. I'm so sorry you have this in
your nice garden, Dave.


You know, I did a little research and I might just have an out
(maybe).

Apparently, a similar type of growth can be seen resulting from
herbicide damage, specifically Roundup for one. While I haven't used
any Roundup in the area that I can remember, this is the plant that
had some damage from the NEEM oil that I sprayed on it in the early
summer. Some of you who have been around a while remember when I
reported that. The plant got purple bruising at the time. I wonder if
this could be the cause? Anyone know how to distinguish rosette from
herbicide damage growth? I saw some messages where they talked about
it, but I wasn't able to figure out what to look for.

I'd appreciate any guidance...
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Old 14-11-2003, 04:32 AM
Cass
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

In article , dave weil
wrote:

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 18:25:10 -0500 (EST), "Shiva"
wrote:

dave weil wrote:

Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.


I'd appreciate any guidance...


I'm not sure what you have, Dave. Contact Ann Peck by email. She has
been fighting rosette for a while now. She can tell you here approach,
including spraying for the mite with Cygon, I believe, cutting out the
blight, and what to watch for.

http://web.ntown.net/~apeck/index.htm

Ann posts at Gardenweb.
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Old 14-11-2003, 05:42 AM
Mike
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003, dave weil wrote:
Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.


Hi Dave,

You may not have to remove the entire bush. Have the symptoms just recently
appeared and have you just noticed the disease on this one cane? You may be
able to save your rose by removing entirely the one infected cane - burn it
or wrap it tightly in plastic before throwing it out. If it is too late to
save the rest of the plant, you will know soon enough as this disease
spreads rapidly. If you notice any more symptoms after removing the one
infected cane, you will have to remove the entire plant, disposing of it as
described above, or your other roses will be at serious risk.

The problem after that remains concern over the mite (Phyllocoptes
fructiphilus) that transfers rose rosette. It is not affected by
traditional miticides. You must use a systemic insecticide/miticide
containing dimethoate, not an attractive option if you are an avowed "no
spray" person.

You have my deepest sympathies as this is definitely a dagger in the heart
of anyone who grows roses. I'm going to hope you caught it in time to save
your valuable mature climber.

Mike




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Old 14-11-2003, 04:12 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 04:39:00 GMT, Mike wrote:

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003, dave weil wrote:
Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.


Hi Dave,

You may not have to remove the entire bush. Have the symptoms just recently
appeared and have you just noticed the disease on this one cane? You may be
able to save your rose by removing entirely the one infected cane - burn it
or wrap it tightly in plastic before throwing it out. If it is too late to
save the rest of the plant, you will know soon enough as this disease
spreads rapidly. If you notice any more symptoms after removing the one
infected cane, you will have to remove the entire plant, disposing of it as
described above, or your other roses will be at serious risk.

The problem after that remains concern over the mite (Phyllocoptes
fructiphilus) that transfers rose rosette. It is not affected by
traditional miticides. You must use a systemic insecticide/miticide
containing dimethoate, not an attractive option if you are an avowed "no
spray" person.

You have my deepest sympathies as this is definitely a dagger in the heart
of anyone who grows roses. I'm going to hope you caught it in time to save
your valuable mature climber.

Mike


Mike - thanks for the advice. Same goes to Cass. I've contacted Ann
Peck and am hoping for an answer soon.

I'm really hoping for the NEEM oil abuse scenario. I'd really hate to
lose this plant, not only because it will leave my fence bare, but it
will be a real mess to remove. Plus, I'm quite fond of it as it was my
first rose planting.

Here's a question about the mites (if it turns out that this is indeed
Rosettes). Should the first frost have taken care of them (last night
we got our first deep frost)? If so, can I assume that my upcoming
dormant spray application would also take care of them until spring?

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Old 14-11-2003, 05:32 PM
Theo
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

Dave if it is RRD my commiserations.

Around here it is a rural disease and
will absolutely decimate entire stands
of roses.

Though it seems really surprising that you have it.
RRD mites spread by wind so there has to be
continous trail of roses within a few hundred yards
all the way from your garden to the rural infection.

In KC the surrounding prairie is absolutely swarmings
w/ infected Multiflora but disease inside the city is
almost unknown.

The other thing that surprised be is the 'witches broom'
had buds and blooms on them. Never thought that was possible.

The real bummer if it is RRD is that you not only must find
the plants in you garden that are infected but also the ones
in the neighbhorhood that brought the disease to you. Those need to be
exterminated as well.

Heres to hoping its NOT RRD.

--
Theo

in KC Z5

"dave weil" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 04:39:00 GMT, Mike wrote:

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003, dave weil wrote:
Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.


Hi Dave,

You may not have to remove the entire bush. Have the symptoms just

recently
appeared and have you just noticed the disease on this one cane? You may

be
able to save your rose by removing entirely the one infected cane - burn

it
or wrap it tightly in plastic before throwing it out. If it is too late

to
save the rest of the plant, you will know soon enough as this disease
spreads rapidly. If you notice any more symptoms after removing the one
infected cane, you will have to remove the entire plant, disposing of it

as
described above, or your other roses will be at serious risk.

The problem after that remains concern over the mite (Phyllocoptes
fructiphilus) that transfers rose rosette. It is not affected by
traditional miticides. You must use a systemic insecticide/miticide
containing dimethoate, not an attractive option if you are an avowed "no
spray" person.

You have my deepest sympathies as this is definitely a dagger in the

heart
of anyone who grows roses. I'm going to hope you caught it in time to

save
your valuable mature climber.

Mike


Mike - thanks for the advice. Same goes to Cass. I've contacted Ann
Peck and am hoping for an answer soon.

I'm really hoping for the NEEM oil abuse scenario. I'd really hate to
lose this plant, not only because it will leave my fence bare, but it
will be a real mess to remove. Plus, I'm quite fond of it as it was my
first rose planting.

Here's a question about the mites (if it turns out that this is indeed
Rosettes). Should the first frost have taken care of them (last night
we got our first deep frost)? If so, can I assume that my upcoming
dormant spray application would also take care of them until spring?



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Old 15-11-2003, 03:02 AM
Tim Tompkins
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

In my humble opinion, based upon the photo links in the original message,
this is NOT Witches Broom.

It appears to be something that has desicated a limited area of the plant
and the photos don't show the characteristic deformities of Witches Broom.

I hope that what you are experiencing is a result of the neem application
you referenced. I would NOT worry any further about mites this season and
wait until next spring to apply miticide again.

Simply my $0.02 worth, good luck!

Tim


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Old 15-11-2003, 03:22 AM
Mike
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oh dear - witches broom on my Old Blush climber

On Fri, 14 Nov 2003, dave weil wrote:
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 04:39:00 GMT, Mike wrote:

On Thu, 13 Nov 2003, dave weil wrote:
Yes, dear friends, I have witches broom on my rather extensive and
sprawling Old Blush climber. Here's the evidence.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23272504
http://www.pbase.com/image/23272556

I'm rather down about it at the moment. I'm assuming that this 20 foot
rose bush has to go, right?

Please, somebody tell me I'm wrong.

Please.


Hi Dave,

You may not have to remove the entire bush. Have the symptoms just recently
appeared and have you just noticed the disease on this one cane? You may be
able to save your rose by removing entirely the one infected cane - burn it
or wrap it tightly in plastic before throwing it out. If it is too late to
save the rest of the plant, you will know soon enough as this disease
spreads rapidly. If you notice any more symptoms after removing the one
infected cane, you will have to remove the entire plant, disposing of it as
described above, or your other roses will be at serious risk.

The problem after that remains concern over the mite (Phyllocoptes
fructiphilus) that transfers rose rosette. It is not affected by
traditional miticides. You must use a systemic insecticide/miticide
containing dimethoate, not an attractive option if you are an avowed "no
spray" person.

You have my deepest sympathies as this is definitely a dagger in the heart
of anyone who grows roses. I'm going to hope you caught it in time to save
your valuable mature climber.

Mike


Mike - thanks for the advice. Same goes to Cass. I've contacted Ann
Peck and am hoping for an answer soon.

I'm really hoping for the NEEM oil abuse scenario. I'd really hate to
lose this plant, not only because it will leave my fence bare, but it
will be a real mess to remove. Plus, I'm quite fond of it as it was my
first rose planting.

Here's a question about the mites (if it turns out that this is indeed
Rosettes). Should the first frost have taken care of them (last night
we got our first deep frost)? If so, can I assume that my upcoming
dormant spray application would also take care of them until spring?


Dimethoate is the only proven treatment for a rose that already harbors
this particular mite. A clue that this is rose rosette (as opposed to a
reaction to spraying) is if the stems are covered in long soft rubbery
prickles.

Mike




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