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Old 24-02-2004, 04:47 AM
JimS.
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.

JimS.
Seattle



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Old 25-02-2004, 08:03 PM
Unique Too
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

JIm,
Although it wasn't for raised beds we put in a wall of sorts on sloping
ground. The first one we started at the lowest point and worked our way up.
And you're right, each piece of lumber had to be cut a different length and the
cut end dug into the ground a few inches.
The second wall we started at the finished height and worked our way down from
there. It seemed we had less digging to do and it was easier to keep it level.
We attached the free end of the wood to a post to keep it level from the top.
I'm not sure how that would work with 6 X 6 lumber. Oh another thing, we used
the soil we dug out to fill little gaps in the wall in a couple of locations
where we didn't get it dug in far enough. It held up fine and was much easier
than pulling it out and digging away more soil.

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.



  #3   Report Post  
Old 25-02-2004, 08:18 PM
Unique Too
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

JIm,
Although it wasn't for raised beds we put in a wall of sorts on sloping
ground. The first one we started at the lowest point and worked our way up.
And you're right, each piece of lumber had to be cut a different length and the
cut end dug into the ground a few inches.
The second wall we started at the finished height and worked our way down from
there. It seemed we had less digging to do and it was easier to keep it level.
We attached the free end of the wood to a post to keep it level from the top.
I'm not sure how that would work with 6 X 6 lumber. Oh another thing, we used
the soil we dug out to fill little gaps in the wall in a couple of locations
where we didn't get it dug in far enough. It held up fine and was much easier
than pulling it out and digging away more soil.

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.



  #4   Report Post  
Old 25-02-2004, 08:35 PM
Unique Too
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

JIm,
Although it wasn't for raised beds we put in a wall of sorts on sloping
ground. The first one we started at the lowest point and worked our way up.
And you're right, each piece of lumber had to be cut a different length and the
cut end dug into the ground a few inches.
The second wall we started at the finished height and worked our way down from
there. It seemed we had less digging to do and it was easier to keep it level.
We attached the free end of the wood to a post to keep it level from the top.
I'm not sure how that would work with 6 X 6 lumber. Oh another thing, we used
the soil we dug out to fill little gaps in the wall in a couple of locations
where we didn't get it dug in far enough. It held up fine and was much easier
than pulling it out and digging away more soil.

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.



  #5   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2004, 04:00 AM
JimS.
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

Thanks, that is helpful. I've been having a little trouble visualizing what
I need to do, though intuitively I'm guessing it's pretty simple when I
finally get down to it. This will help. All I know is, I gotta get going
soon, it's going to be planting season before I know it. My already-planted
roses broke dormancy weeks ago. Yes, we have a sort of faux-winter here in
Seattle. Thirsty roses love it, apparantly.

JimS.
Seattle


"Unique Too" wrote in message
...
JIm,
Although it wasn't for raised beds we put in a wall of sorts on sloping
ground. The first one we started at the lowest point and worked our way

up.
And you're right, each piece of lumber had to be cut a different length

and the
cut end dug into the ground a few inches.
The second wall we started at the finished height and worked our way down

from
there. It seemed we had less digging to do and it was easier to keep it

level.
We attached the free end of the wood to a post to keep it level from the

top.
I'm not sure how that would work with 6 X 6 lumber. Oh another thing, we

used
the soil we dug out to fill little gaps in the wall in a couple of

locations
where we didn't get it dug in far enough. It held up fine and was much

easier
than pulling it out and digging away more soil.

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along

the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.







  #6   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2004, 04:02 AM
JimS.
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

Thanks, that is helpful. I've been having a little trouble visualizing what
I need to do, though intuitively I'm guessing it's pretty simple when I
finally get down to it. This will help. All I know is, I gotta get going
soon, it's going to be planting season before I know it. My already-planted
roses broke dormancy weeks ago. Yes, we have a sort of faux-winter here in
Seattle. Thirsty roses love it, apparantly.

JimS.
Seattle


"Unique Too" wrote in message
...
JIm,
Although it wasn't for raised beds we put in a wall of sorts on sloping
ground. The first one we started at the lowest point and worked our way

up.
And you're right, each piece of lumber had to be cut a different length

and the
cut end dug into the ground a few inches.
The second wall we started at the finished height and worked our way down

from
there. It seemed we had less digging to do and it was easier to keep it

level.
We attached the free end of the wood to a post to keep it level from the

top.
I'm not sure how that would work with 6 X 6 lumber. Oh another thing, we

used
the soil we dug out to fill little gaps in the wall in a couple of

locations
where we didn't get it dug in far enough. It held up fine and was much

easier
than pulling it out and digging away more soil.

Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along

the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?

Any help appreciated.





  #7   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2004, 08:35 AM
tmtresh
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds.



Be extra careful when using pressure treated wood. Myself, I wouldn't touch
it with a ten-foot pole. Google for "pressure treated wood" and you'll see
what I mean. Besides leaching harmful chemicals such as arsenic in the soil,
there's tons of other problems it causes. Touching it can give you rashes,
it can cause arsenic poisoning in children (people used to build play
equipment with it) and adults just from handling it. It's at it's worst when
it's cut or burned, when the sawdust or smoke is breathed in. It causes a
range of problems from cancer to asthma. It is also banned in several
countries.

I'd hate for you to regret your decision later, after you've put it in. If
you still decide to use it, be very careful.


  #8   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2004, 05:32 PM
Snooze
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

"JimS." wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?


Pressure treated wood is generally a bad idea, the chemicals they force into
the wood to prevent rotting are bad for the environment and bad for plants
(especially if you grow veggies near them).

You don't say how steep the grade is, but here are some options.
1: Dig a U shaped trench into the grade, and lay wood beams in.
2: Terrace the wood beams as the grade dictates, so the trenching is
minimal.
3: use landscape blocks to build terraced retaining walls.

Sameer


  #9   Report Post  
Old 26-02-2004, 05:59 PM
Snooze
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

"JimS." wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?


Pressure treated wood is generally a bad idea, the chemicals they force into
the wood to prevent rotting are bad for the environment and bad for plants
(especially if you grow veggies near them).

You don't say how steep the grade is, but here are some options.
1: Dig a U shaped trench into the grade, and lay wood beams in.
2: Terrace the wood beams as the grade dictates, so the trenching is
minimal.
3: use landscape blocks to build terraced retaining walls.

Sameer


  #10   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2004, 04:07 AM
Sue Solomon
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

Hi Jim
I 'm putting in a plug for using stacking concrete landscape blocks for your
raised lawn beds. You can get them in small (about 8") size or large (about
12"+), in 2 or 3 different colors (fawn, gray, or "redwood"), they stack up
to 3' tall without problems, you can make circles and swoopy forms... and if
you don't do it right the first time, they're easy to take apart and
restack. I love them. We've put in over 90 linear ft. of 3' concrete block
pavers around my hilltop home, and we made a lovely raised bed for my 30
roses. The neighbors all like it, and several have decided to invest in
them. I got mine from Home Depot - (along with some cheap roses!) Big
"Legacy" blocks are $2.98 apiece here in SOCAL. The only downside; the big
ones weigh 60 lb. apiece, and you need to dig and level a foundation trench
for them and fill it with packed sand. Get some help if you do it.

But the results are very professional looking, and won't rot out in 10 yrs.
:-)

Just my thought!
Sue Solomon



"Snooze" wrote in message
. com...
"JimS." wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along

the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make

the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going

to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?


Pressure treated wood is generally a bad idea, the chemicals they force

into
the wood to prevent rotting are bad for the environment and bad for plants
(especially if you grow veggies near them).

You don't say how steep the grade is, but here are some options.
1: Dig a U shaped trench into the grade, and lay wood beams in.
2: Terrace the wood beams as the grade dictates, so the trenching is
minimal.
3: use landscape blocks to build terraced retaining walls.

Sameer






  #11   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2004, 04:12 AM
Sue Solomon
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

Hi Jim
I 'm putting in a plug for using stacking concrete landscape blocks for your
raised lawn beds. You can get them in small (about 8") size or large (about
12"+), in 2 or 3 different colors (fawn, gray, or "redwood"), they stack up
to 3' tall without problems, you can make circles and swoopy forms... and if
you don't do it right the first time, they're easy to take apart and
restack. I love them. We've put in over 90 linear ft. of 3' concrete block
pavers around my hilltop home, and we made a lovely raised bed for my 30
roses. The neighbors all like it, and several have decided to invest in
them. I got mine from Home Depot - (along with some cheap roses!) Big
"Legacy" blocks are $2.98 apiece here in SOCAL. The only downside; the big
ones weigh 60 lb. apiece, and you need to dig and level a foundation trench
for them and fill it with packed sand. Get some help if you do it.

But the results are very professional looking, and won't rot out in 10 yrs.
:-)

Just my thought!
Sue Solomon



"Snooze" wrote in message
. com...
"JimS." wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along

the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make

the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going

to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?


Pressure treated wood is generally a bad idea, the chemicals they force

into
the wood to prevent rotting are bad for the environment and bad for plants
(especially if you grow veggies near them).

You don't say how steep the grade is, but here are some options.
1: Dig a U shaped trench into the grade, and lay wood beams in.
2: Terrace the wood beams as the grade dictates, so the trenching is
minimal.
3: use landscape blocks to build terraced retaining walls.

Sameer




  #12   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2004, 08:02 PM
Theo
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?

I love 'em too. Except for the weight.
They can can only do gentle curves.
You can't use them to wrap around a tree
without fairly substantial gaps for instance.

If you stack them a bit high try to use
landscape fabric. The weeds and grasses
get lodged in the crevices and because
you can't get the roots its a constant
battle with weed control.

Also ants seem to love the little cavities.
I have 6 colonies in a 10' stretch. They litter
a bit but I don't mind them. As a plus no slugs.

--
Theo

in KC Z5

"Sue Solomon" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi Jim
I 'm putting in a plug for using stacking concrete landscape blocks for

your
raised lawn beds. You can get them in small (about 8") size or large

(about
12"+), in 2 or 3 different colors (fawn, gray, or "redwood"), they stack

up
to 3' tall without problems, you can make circles and swoopy forms... and

if
you don't do it right the first time, they're easy to take apart and
restack. I love them. We've put in over 90 linear ft. of 3' concrete block
pavers around my hilltop home, and we made a lovely raised bed for my 30
roses. The neighbors all like it, and several have decided to invest in
them. I got mine from Home Depot - (along with some cheap roses!) Big
"Legacy" blocks are $2.98 apiece here in SOCAL. The only downside; the big
ones weigh 60 lb. apiece, and you need to dig and level a foundation

trench
for them and fill it with packed sand. Get some help if you do it.

But the results are very professional looking, and won't rot out in 10

yrs.
:-)

Just my thought!
Sue Solomon



"Snooze" wrote in message
. com...
"JimS." wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to

build
a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along

the
length of the house.

I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make

the
beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other

end.

Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going

to
involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?


Pressure treated wood is generally a bad idea, the chemicals they force

into
the wood to prevent rotting are bad for the environment and bad for

plants
(especially if you grow veggies near them).

You don't say how steep the grade is, but here are some options.
1: Dig a U shaped trench into the grade, and lay wood beams in.
2: Terrace the wood beams as the grade dictates, so the trenching is
minimal.
3: use landscape blocks to build terraced retaining walls.

Sameer






  #13   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2004, 12:29 AM
Tom Line
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?


Would it be less work to adjust the house? What about having the beds at
decreasing heights?

--------
--------
----------
-----------------------------


JimS. wrote:
: Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
: a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
: length of the house.
:
: I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
: beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.
:
: Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
: involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?
:
: Any help appreciated.
:
: JimS.
: Seattle
:
:

--



Tom Line



  #14   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2004, 12:29 AM
Tom Line
 
Posts: n/a
Default building raised beds on sloping lawn?


Would it be less work to adjust the house? What about having the beds at
decreasing heights?

--------
--------
----------
-----------------------------


JimS. wrote:
: Has anyone built raised planters on lawn that is not level? I want to build
: a raised bed on the side of my house, but the ground slopes down along the
: length of the house.
:
: I am pretty sure I want to use some 6x6 pressure treated wood to make the
: beds. But one end needs to be built up to be level with the other end.
:
: Has anyone done this, and got suggestions? I'm thinking this is going to
: involve some digging to partially bury the front timbers?
:
: Any help appreciated.
:
: JimS.
: Seattle
:
:

--



Tom Line



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Old 03-02-2011, 05:38 PM
Registered User
 
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Posts: 6
Default

I have had a visualization of what the trouble I need to do, but the intuition is quite simple I guess, when I finally arrived. This will help. I know, I gotta go Soon, it will be before the planting season, I know it. I have planted, Rose breaking dormancy weeks ago.
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