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Old 19-08-2004, 04:03 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default That odd straight across pruning method recently mentioned

I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.

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Old 19-08-2004, 05:16 PM
Martin
 
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You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
...
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.



  #3   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 01:17 AM
ben boorman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have seen this done for hedge roses, doesn't look that good for garden
roses. Besides, you aren't really growing roses unless you have scars
to prove it.

dave weil wrote:

I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.


  #4   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 01:17 AM
ben boorman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have seen this done for hedge roses, doesn't look that good for garden
roses. Besides, you aren't really growing roses unless you have scars
to prove it.

dave weil wrote:

I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.


  #5   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 02:34 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:16:03 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster


As much as I appreciate the help, I know all of that stuff. Anyone
who's listened to me pratter on on this newgroup for the past couple
of years can attest to that.

Besides, I've probably to about 5 books that say the exact same thing.

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
.. .
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.





  #6   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 02:34 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:16:03 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster


As much as I appreciate the help, I know all of that stuff. Anyone
who's listened to me pratter on on this newgroup for the past couple
of years can attest to that.

Besides, I've probably to about 5 books that say the exact same thing.

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
.. .
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.



  #7   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 02:38 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 00:17:44 GMT, ben boorman
wrote:

I have seen this done for hedge roses, doesn't look that good for garden
roses.


Well, that's not what was written here recently. They say it works
surprisingly well. Apparently some big garden in the UK does it this
way, to great effect. That's why I'm interested, but I don't think I
saved the post unfortunately. My more conventional pruning hasn't been
all that succesful with this bush, not that I claim to have done it
exactly right.

Besides, you aren't really growing roses unless you have scars
to prove it.


Well, your idea of rose growing and mine don't coincide, esecially
since I usually do my pruning shirtless, in shorts and barefooted.
I've got more holes in my foot than anyone can imagine. Yeah, I know -
it's my own fault, but I'm lazy g.

dave weil wrote:

I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.


  #8   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 02:38 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 00:17:44 GMT, ben boorman
wrote:

I have seen this done for hedge roses, doesn't look that good for garden
roses.


Well, that's not what was written here recently. They say it works
surprisingly well. Apparently some big garden in the UK does it this
way, to great effect. That's why I'm interested, but I don't think I
saved the post unfortunately. My more conventional pruning hasn't been
all that succesful with this bush, not that I claim to have done it
exactly right.

Besides, you aren't really growing roses unless you have scars
to prove it.


Well, your idea of rose growing and mine don't coincide, esecially
since I usually do my pruning shirtless, in shorts and barefooted.
I've got more holes in my foot than anyone can imagine. Yeah, I know -
it's my own fault, but I'm lazy g.

dave weil wrote:

I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.


  #9   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 09:40 AM
Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That must be good advice then if you have five books in agreement with our
own article on pruning! Perhaps that say's something in itself?

On the question of pruning straight across, I recall the Royal National Rose
Society (foolishly) advocate this method on one occasion, but they have
since rescinded that advice. The method did not choose any particular line
to cut to for individual stems, it was more a case of "hedge cutting with a
hedge trimmer or lawn shears". This method might appear to work to start
with on vigorous bushes but die back will be extensive which will eventually
weaken and/or make the rose look unsightly.

Our society has many rose exhibitors in its ranks, many of national level,
we can also boast at least four national champions. Articles about the
cultivation of the Rose on the Bexrose web site are probably more meaningful
than the lay-rose grower would appreciate at first sight.

So for the best of the best look again at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose and don't forget to read it all,
and between the lines!

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster
PS they say you can lead a horse to water but can't make him drink! - Have
you tried holding his head under?!

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:16:03 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster


As much as I appreciate the help, I know all of that stuff. Anyone
who's listened to me pratter on on this newgroup for the past couple
of years can attest to that.

Besides, I've probably to about 5 books that say the exact same thing.

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
.. .
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.





  #10   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 09:40 AM
Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That must be good advice then if you have five books in agreement with our
own article on pruning! Perhaps that say's something in itself?

On the question of pruning straight across, I recall the Royal National Rose
Society (foolishly) advocate this method on one occasion, but they have
since rescinded that advice. The method did not choose any particular line
to cut to for individual stems, it was more a case of "hedge cutting with a
hedge trimmer or lawn shears". This method might appear to work to start
with on vigorous bushes but die back will be extensive which will eventually
weaken and/or make the rose look unsightly.

Our society has many rose exhibitors in its ranks, many of national level,
we can also boast at least four national champions. Articles about the
cultivation of the Rose on the Bexrose web site are probably more meaningful
than the lay-rose grower would appreciate at first sight.

So for the best of the best look again at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose and don't forget to read it all,
and between the lines!

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster
PS they say you can lead a horse to water but can't make him drink! - Have
you tried holding his head under?!

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:16:03 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster


As much as I appreciate the help, I know all of that stuff. Anyone
who's listened to me pratter on on this newgroup for the past couple
of years can attest to that.

Besides, I've probably to about 5 books that say the exact same thing.

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
.. .
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.







  #11   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 09:46 AM
Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Are you that (sour) grape grower, again?!

Martin

"Zericall" wrote in message
news
Yawn!

On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 16:16:03 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

You will find an article on pruning on the Bexrose web site at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose


Regards

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"dave weil" wrote in message
.. .
I'm curious about the details of that pruning method that some Brits
use for bushes. You know, the one where you just make a straight cut
across the middle top of the bush. Does anyone have any details about
it? Where do you choose your line? Do you do any other "lateral"
pruning. Etc. Etc.

My big Aloha is getting rangy and "tall growing" instead of its normal
bush form. I'd like to get it back to normal if possible. It's now
about 10 feet tall in the middle but looks sparse on the side. It used
to be really round. If this odd pruning method can help, I'm game. My
previous pruning methods haven't really helped the shape of the bush.





  #12   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 12:50 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:40:44 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

That must be good advice then if you have five books in agreement with our
own article on pruning! Perhaps that say's something in itself?


Yes, it says that, while it's OK to offer that *widely* available
information on *your* web site (only one of dozens of websites that
give the same information I might add), next time, please read the
post before you promote your site instead of relying on a simple
keyword to trigger some sort of quasiautoresponsebot sort of response.

It will do your cause well, instead of causing people to ignore
possible HELPFUL posts from you, as well as possibly avoiding the very
website that you are trying to promote.

Don' worry though, once you've been in the newsgroups awhile, you're
likely to catch on.
  #13   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 12:50 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:40:44 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

That must be good advice then if you have five books in agreement with our
own article on pruning! Perhaps that say's something in itself?


Yes, it says that, while it's OK to offer that *widely* available
information on *your* web site (only one of dozens of websites that
give the same information I might add), next time, please read the
post before you promote your site instead of relying on a simple
keyword to trigger some sort of quasiautoresponsebot sort of response.

It will do your cause well, instead of causing people to ignore
possible HELPFUL posts from you, as well as possibly avoiding the very
website that you are trying to promote.

Don' worry though, once you've been in the newsgroups awhile, you're
likely to catch on.
  #14   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 01:13 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:40:44 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

So for the best of the best look again at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose and don't forget to read it all,
and between the lines!


It's not a bad site for a UK specific website. It's an immature site
that I'm sure will grow with time. But it's hardly "the best of the
best". It's barely adequate. It doesn't address very many rose issues
and is pretty much barebones.

For instance, *our* local website has FAR more valuable information
regarding roses.

http://www.nashvillerosesociety.com/

I don't care much for the look and feel of the NRS site, but it still
offers practical information about the challenges that our area offers
(issues that are FAR different than the issues that the UK growers
face).

So, drop the smugness and get on with building your site.

PS, we have quite a few National winning members as well, including a
well-known breeder or two *and* Ted Mills, who makes one of the most
famous rose formulations sold in the States. I haven't been a member
for a couple of years, but I still consult the website on occasion.

Your site frankly doesn't need your bluster.
  #15   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2004, 01:13 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:40:44 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

So for the best of the best look again at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose and don't forget to read it all,
and between the lines!


It's not a bad site for a UK specific website. It's an immature site
that I'm sure will grow with time. But it's hardly "the best of the
best". It's barely adequate. It doesn't address very many rose issues
and is pretty much barebones.

For instance, *our* local website has FAR more valuable information
regarding roses.

http://www.nashvillerosesociety.com/

I don't care much for the look and feel of the NRS site, but it still
offers practical information about the challenges that our area offers
(issues that are FAR different than the issues that the UK growers
face).

So, drop the smugness and get on with building your site.

PS, we have quite a few National winning members as well, including a
well-known breeder or two *and* Ted Mills, who makes one of the most
famous rose formulations sold in the States. I haven't been a member
for a couple of years, but I still consult the website on occasion.

Your site frankly doesn't need your bluster.


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