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Old 14-07-2005, 09:15 AM
Blah
 
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Default Hybrid Tea Indoors?

Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


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Old 14-07-2005, 12:10 PM
Henry
 
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Blah wrote:
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Unless you have a greenhouse where a plant can receive enough sun, it is
unlikely an rose will do well indoors. They simply need more light than
you can give them. They may live a little while but they will not
thrive not bloom well. There are lots of plants that do well indoors.
Roses don't happen to be among them.

--
Henry
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Old 14-07-2005, 12:11 PM
Henry
 
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Blah wrote:
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Unless you have a greenhouse where a plant can receive enough sun, it is
unlikely an rose will do well indoors. They simply need more light than
you can give them. They may live a little while but they will not
thrive not bloom well. There are lots of plants that do well indoors.
Roses don't happen to be among them.

--
Henry
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Old 14-07-2005, 04:16 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 07:11:24 -0400, Henry
wrote:

Blah wrote:
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Unless you have a greenhouse where a plant can receive enough sun, it is
unlikely an rose will do well indoors. They simply need more light than
you can give them. They may live a little while but they will not
thrive not bloom well. There are lots of plants that do well indoors.
Roses don't happen to be among them.


They are also susceptable to the things like afflict other
houseplants, such as spider mites. Generally, air circulation isn't
good enough for roses. If you can master container gardening, you
MIGHT be able to move a potted rose indoors for short periods of time,
but keep in mind that you are exposing your other indoor plants to
possible outdoor pests, and/or exposing your rose to indoor-prone
pests like spider mites. To bring them indoors though means lots of
artificial light (or direct sunlight through a picture window), plus
the fact that roses thrive at much higher "growing season" temps than
the usual low 70s (and low humidity) of the indoors. If you have a
sunroom, you might be able to pull this off, but you might find it
uncomfortable to lounge around in there at temperatures that roses
enjoy. Remember too, that most roses need at least 4-6 hours of direct
sunlight. They also need LOTS of air circulation.

Roses are really outdoor plants, but some have been somewhat
successful at bringing them indoors. It takes a lot of work and a
little bit of luck as well.
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Old 15-07-2005, 09:43 AM
Martin
 
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Yes HT's can be grown indoors, and can bloom more continuously than outdoor
roses. But you will have your work cut out. You will need space, light and
air in large quantities in addition to the general requirements for good
growing.
To make life easier I would recommend growing miniature indoors and for a
good book on the subject see 'The Complete Book of Miniature Roses' by
Charles Marden Fitch, published by Hawthorn Books Inc, New York and Prentice
Hall, Ontario.

We will cover the subject on our web site eventually but in the meantime see
our web site for general cultural requirements for rose growing at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"Blah" wrote in message
ups.com...
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.





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Old 15-07-2005, 07:31 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 08:43:59 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

Yes HT's can be grown indoors, and can bloom more continuously than outdoor
roses. But you will have your work cut out. You will need space, light and
air in large quantities in addition to the general requirements for good
growing.
To make life easier I would recommend growing miniature indoors and for a
good book on the subject see 'The Complete Book of Miniature Roses' by
Charles Marden Fitch, published by Hawthorn Books Inc, New York and Prentice
Hall, Ontario.

We will cover the subject on our web site eventually but in the meantime see
our web site for general cultural requirements for rose growing at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"Blah" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Just curious. Does anyone find a post like this useful?
  #7   Report Post  
Old 15-07-2005, 08:01 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 13:31:11 -0500, dave weil
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 08:43:59 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

Yes HT's can be grown indoors, and can bloom more continuously than outdoor
roses. But you will have your work cut out. You will need space, light and
air in large quantities in addition to the general requirements for good
growing.
To make life easier I would recommend growing miniature indoors and for a
good book on the subject see 'The Complete Book of Miniature Roses' by
Charles Marden Fitch, published by Hawthorn Books Inc, New York and Prentice
Hall, Ontario.

We will cover the subject on our web site eventually but in the meantime see
our web site for general cultural requirements for rose growing at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"Blah" wrote in message
roups.com...
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Just curious. Does anyone find a post like this useful?



I certainly do.

I keep citrus trees indoors in the winter & would love to overwinter a
rose or two. I generally grow roses in tubs on my deck & in the fall
plant them in the rose garden. They do not last the winter unless in
the ground around here. I keep miniatures going all winter indoors. No
problem with them at all.

This year I will have an olive tree indoors, too. Indoor gardening of
large plants can be difficult, as the plants are not in contact with
natural pest predators. They need to be watched carefully or
infestations can destroy them.

Boron
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Old 15-07-2005, 08:15 PM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 15:01:45 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 13:31:11 -0500, dave weil
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 08:43:59 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"
wrote:

Yes HT's can be grown indoors, and can bloom more continuously than outdoor
roses. But you will have your work cut out. You will need space, light and
air in large quantities in addition to the general requirements for good
growing.
To make life easier I would recommend growing miniature indoors and for a
good book on the subject see 'The Complete Book of Miniature Roses' by
Charles Marden Fitch, published by Hawthorn Books Inc, New York and Prentice
Hall, Ontario.

We will cover the subject on our web site eventually but in the meantime see
our web site for general cultural requirements for rose growing at:-
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

Enjoy

Martin Double
Bexrose - Webmaster

Email:
Web Site:
http://home.btconnect.com/cadoss/bexrose

"Blah" wrote in message
groups.com...
Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.


Just curious. Does anyone find a post like this useful?



I certainly do.

I keep citrus trees indoors in the winter & would love to overwinter a
rose or two. I generally grow roses in tubs on my deck & in the fall
plant them in the rose garden. They do not last the winter unless in
the ground around here. I keep miniatures going all winter indoors. No
problem with them at all.


So, tell me, what information about roses was imparted in this post?
Did you really need the book recommendation that badly?

This year I will have an olive tree indoors, too. Indoor gardening of
large plants can be difficult, as the plants are not in contact with
natural pest predators. They need to be watched carefully or
infestations can destroy them.


Well yes. That's why specific information is helpful, information like
I passed along before this post, this post that had NOTHING specific
about growing roses indoors except that you need "space, light and air
in large quantities". Well, if you needed to know that, then I'd
suggest that you REALLY have your "work cut out for you".

However, I'd maintain that YOUR OWN POST contained more specifics than
the original post.

But I'm glad that you found that post informative "boron".
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Old 15-07-2005, 09:26 PM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 14:15:03 -0500, dave weil
wrote:


But I'm glad that you found that post informative "boron".


You have either been on Usenet too long or not long enough if the two
initial posts caused you such displeasure.

My interest is in finding out that someone else would even attempt the
roses indoors. If that engenders a discussion of any sort whatsoever,
even to the point where my own post has contributed something, however
meager, than it may interest someone else to join into the thread,
too. Other wise the initial post might go unanswered altogether.

This group is not so heavily laden with posts that this thread and its
replies should be taken to task. There is no need to discourage posts
that might stir a good conversation. Some threads need more nurturing
than others to blossom nicely...they are similar to roses in that
respect.

Boron
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Old 15-07-2005, 10:02 PM
Tom Line
 
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Try those places that sell products used to grow marijuana indoors. I wonder if high tech
hydroponics could produce super roses? They basically use street lights, high pressure sodium
and metal halides. These require external ballasts and produce heat requiring ventilation and
safety precautions.

Blah wrote:
: Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
: than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
: difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
: way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
: up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.
:

--




Tom Line

For Fun And Safety In Firearms Sports visit...
--
http://www.bobtuley.com --



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Old 16-07-2005, 02:05 AM
dave weil
 
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Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 16:26:13 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 14:15:03 -0500, dave weil
wrote:


But I'm glad that you found that post informative "boron".


You have either been on Usenet too long or not long enough if the two
initial posts caused you such displeasure.


Annoyance might be a better word. And it wasn't the INITIAL post that
was the annoyance. If you thought that, then you're mistaken. You
might find MY response to the post as evidence. I found the initial
post as something that deserved a careful reply.

My interest is in finding out that someone else would even attempt the
roses indoors. If that engenders a discussion of any sort whatsoever,
even to the point where my own post has contributed something, however
meager, than it may interest someone else to join into the thread,
too. Other wise the initial post might go unanswered altogether.


Well, it already hadn't. But, as I said, YOUR own post had more
relevant content than the rather flip and promotional post from Mr.
Double.

This group is not so heavily laden with posts that this thread and its
replies should be taken to task. There is no need to discourage posts
that might stir a good conversation.


Well, that's sort of my point. If a post has something to offer,
that's fine. One might argue that a book recommendation was an
offering. However, the OP wanted info on hybrid teas, so the
helpfulness is questionable.

Some threads need more nurturing
than others to blossom nicely...they are similar to roses in that
respect.


Well yes - they don't need to be buried behind billboards. Or craven
posts either.

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Old 16-07-2005, 02:08 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 15 Jul 2005 17:02:13 -0400, Tom Line wrote:


Try those places that sell products used to grow marijuana indoors. I wonder if high tech
hydroponics could produce super roses? They basically use street lights, high pressure sodium
and metal halides. These require external ballasts and produce heat requiring ventilation and
safety precautions.

Blah wrote:
: Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
: than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
: difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
: way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
: up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.
:


Just be ready for some scrutiny from the authorities, who look for
such purchases, although in quantities necessary to grow a couple of
roses, it might not make a difference.

I suspect that roses wouldn't do very well hydroponically. It has all
of those really fine feeder roots that woudn't probably do well in
water, although it's just an uneducated guess.
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Old 16-07-2005, 03:04 AM
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 20:08:04 -0500, dave weil
wrote:

On 15 Jul 2005 17:02:13 -0400, Tom Line wrote:


Try those places that sell products used to grow marijuana indoors. I wonder if high tech
hydroponics could produce super roses? They basically use street lights, high pressure sodium
and metal halides. These require external ballasts and produce heat requiring ventilation and
safety precautions.

Blah wrote:
: Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
: than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
: difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
: way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
: up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.
:


Just be ready for some scrutiny from the authorities, who look for
such purchases, although in quantities necessary to grow a couple of
roses, it might not make a difference.

I suspect that roses wouldn't do very well hydroponically. It has all
of those really fine feeder roots that woudn't probably do well in
water, although it's just an uneducated guess.



They do quite well and are often grown commercially this way.

http://www.hydroponics.com.au/back_issues/issue65.html
http://www.kelleywholesale.com/redgal.html

You can easily google for dozens more sites of hydroponic rose
growers.

boron
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Old 16-07-2005, 03:47 AM
dave weil
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 22:04:03 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 20:08:04 -0500, dave weil
wrote:

On 15 Jul 2005 17:02:13 -0400, Tom Line wrote:


Try those places that sell products used to grow marijuana indoors. I wonder if high tech
hydroponics could produce super roses? They basically use street lights, high pressure sodium
and metal halides. These require external ballasts and produce heat requiring ventilation and
safety precautions.

Blah wrote:
: Hi, I was wondering whether hybrid teas can be grown and blooms more
: than once annually indoors and how difficult it would be. If its too
: difficult is there a similar rose that can be successfully grown this
: way? I like the miniature roses since the plants themselves won't take
: up much space but I'd prefer a plant that grows large flowers.
:


Just be ready for some scrutiny from the authorities, who look for
such purchases, although in quantities necessary to grow a couple of
roses, it might not make a difference.

I suspect that roses wouldn't do very well hydroponically. It has all
of those really fine feeder roots that woudn't probably do well in
water, although it's just an uneducated guess.



They do quite well and are often grown commercially this way.

http://www.hydroponics.com.au/back_issues/issue65.html
http://www.kelleywholesale.com/redgal.html

You can easily google for dozens more sites of hydroponic rose
growers.

boron


Well, you learn something new every day. Sounds like an operation
that's more suitable for commercial growing though.

So much for uneducated guesses though. They usually don't pan out, as
I have emphatically proven g.
  #15   Report Post  
Old 16-07-2005, 01:50 PM
Henry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

dave weil wrote:
On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 16:26:13 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

Some threads need more nurturing
than others to blossom nicely...they are similar to roses in that
respect.



Well yes - they don't need to be buried behind billboards. Or craven
posts either.


I have to agree with Dave on this one. Posts by Martin are all very
similar - a paragraph generally on-topic but very short of specifics and
then a link to his web site. Now, I should say that I don't mind an
occasional link to web sites, even people's own site - I've done it
myself when I had a good picture to share. But linking to his site
seems to be all Mr. Double is here for.

Also, if his site had a lot of really good information or well written
articles by rose experts, then I'd mind less. I've looked over the
bexrose site and it isn't exactly encyclopedic. So, a link once in a
while to such a site would be (way) more than enough. Or a link to a
particular article related to a question. For instance, if Paul Barden
posted a link to his site, referencing a relevant article by himself or
one of his contributors, I'd have no problem with that. But Martin
Double is no Paul Barden. Note: I have no connection with Paul other
than to have learned from many of his fine articles (and once by direct
email).

--
Henry


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