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Old 17-08-2003, 09:16 AM
Brian Sandle
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)

James Curts wrote:

The folks I, or those associated with our projects, deal with generally ask
for water, transportation and equipment and in about that order. This is
pertaining to food as we know that medical assistance is of high priority
also.


Seldom if ever do we get requests for seeds except to borrow or buy from a
nearby group of the same culture.


The increasing millions spent on experimenting is almost proportional to the
increasing hunger in the world.


This dilemma is not to be resolved by our huge corporations but by you and
I.


Linkname: GM Animal Feed
URL: http://www.btinternet.com/~clairejr/Animal/animal.html
size: 547 lines

[...]
Animals say no to GMO

There's a more serious problem with the idea of disposing of tonnes of
unsaleable GMOs into animal feed. Animals are refusing to eat it.

Recently, American journalist Steven Sprinkel recently spent four
months collecting reports from farmers growing GM crops. His article,
entitled "When The Corn Hits The Fan" details the following
observations:

* Cattle who were put out into GM corn stubble wouldn't touch it.
* Pigs wouldn't eat the ration when GM crops were included.
* A farmer said, "If you want your cattle to go off their feed, just
switch them out to a GM silage."
* A farmer said that his cattle broke through a fence and ate the
non-GM hybrids but wouldn't touch the GM Roundup Ready corn, even
though they had to walk through the GMs to get to the non-GMs on
the other side of the fence.
* A cattleman saw the weight-gain of his cattle fall off when he
switched to GM feed.
* An organic farmer with a terrible deer problem on his soybeans
found forty of them mowing down his tofu beans while across the
road there wasn't one eating the Roundup Ready GM soy.
* Raccoons romped by the dozen in a field of organic corn, while
down the road there wasn't one ear that had been touched in the Bt
fields.
* Even mice will move on down the line if given an alternative to GM
crops.

Sprinkel asks, "What is it that they know instinctively that most of
us ignore?" He predicts, "When the rotting corn hits the fan, it will
make a tremendous mess, with the debris lying equally on the tables of
the great leaders of the world as well as on the plates of consumers."

Bt crops: toxic harvest

There may be a particular problem with crops genetically engineered to
express the natural insecticide Bt. As long ago as March 1998, a
letter in Farmers Weekly reported that livestock on farms from
Nebraska to Iowa were not grazing normally in fields that contained GM
Bt corn.

Ohio farmer Leon Ridzon does not grow GMOs, but he deals with farmers
who do. He recounted local farmers' experience with Bt corn: "We first
had problems three years ago, when famers planted Bt corn and the cows
refused to eat it. The farmers had to camouflage it to get them to eat
it."

Maybe these cows are just finicky? Ridzon says not - other animals
won't eat Bt grain either: "The Bt corn was left on the cob and stored
in an open bin. The rabbits would not touch it, the squirrels would
not touch it. The rats and mice didn't go near it. It killed all the
spiders in the bins."

Ridzon has become increasingly suspicious about the possible toxicity
of Bt corn. His testimony is the more remarkable for the fact that the
norm for most Ohio farmers is intensively grown and chemically treated
corn - which the animals apparently prefer to GM Bt corn.

Ridzon confirms Sprinkel's account of reduced weight gain in Bt
corn-fed cattle. He says farmers report that cattle need nine pounds
of Bt corn to make a one pound weight gain as compared with only six
of normal corn.

Journalist Steven Sprinkel says that a major U.S. seed dealer told him
that there is evidence that earthworms are dying as a result of the
effects of Bt corn. Sprinkel comments, "This is not an activist
promoting the notion that GMO plants have unpredicated results. It's a
midwestern big seed dealer who would have more to gain by keeping
quiet, and much to lose if he got caught in a liability cross-fire. So
my assumption is that there is a big iceberg under these rumours and
chit-chat. Reasonable people are asking reasonable questions."

Waiting for science

These reports from farmers and seed dealers can easily be dismissed as
anecdotal evidence from which no conclusions can be drawn. But if we
wait for the scientists to catch up, it could be too late. Scientific
studies take years to do, and the majority are funded by industry or
governments greased with biotech dollars. Who is going to fund a study
which may find that a GM crop is toxic?
[...]

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Old 17-08-2003, 01:02 PM
Jim Webster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)


"Brian Sandle" wrote in message
...

* Cattle who were put out into GM corn stubble wouldn't touch it.
* Pigs wouldn't eat the ration when GM crops were included.
* A farmer said, "If you want your cattle to go off their feed, just
switch them out to a GM silage."
* A farmer said that his cattle broke through a fence and ate the
non-GM hybrids but wouldn't touch the GM Roundup Ready corn, even
though they had to walk through the GMs to get to the non-GMs on
the other side of the fence.
* A cattleman saw the weight-gain of his cattle fall off when he
switched to GM feed.
* An organic farmer with a terrible deer problem on his soybeans
found forty of them mowing down his tofu beans while across the
road there wasn't one eating the Roundup Ready GM soy.
* Raccoons romped by the dozen in a field of organic corn, while
down the road there wasn't one ear that had been touched in the Bt
fields.
* Even mice will move on down the line if given an alternative to GM
crops.


funny that
tonnes of GM maize have been imported into Europe and no one has noticed any
difference

perhaps these differences only occur when witnessed by people a long way
away?

Jim Webster


  #3   Report Post  
Old 17-08-2003, 11:33 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)


On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 10:52:12 +0100, "Jim Webster"
wrote:

tonnes of GM maize have been imported into Europe and no one has noticed any
difference


How many tonnes?

Why are US farmers complaining that they have lost $200-$300 million
per annum in corn exports to Europe because of GMOs?

regards
Marcus

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Old 18-08-2003, 07:14 AM
Jim Webster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)


wrote in message
...

On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 10:52:12 +0100, "Jim Webster"
wrote:

tonnes of GM maize have been imported into Europe and no one has noticed

any
difference


How many tonnes?


no one knows

Why are US farmers complaining that they have lost $200-$300 million
per annum in corn exports to Europe because of GMOs?


Unlikely, because last year maize exports fell to the UK because of a crop
shortage, the price for maize gluten went up from about 85 per tonne to
over
100 per tonne due to lack of availability.
There was a shortage of maize, which meant that for the first time in
history the UK managed to export feed wheat to the US.

In the long term, maize has been displaced by wheat in UK diets purely on
price, the last round of CAP reforms cut the market price of EU produced
feed wheat which made maize comparatively expensive for feed compounders
using 'least cost' formulations. When I was a kid cattle feed was basically
a mixture of maize and soya, which is something the UK industry hasn't been
able to afford for over thirty years. With the MTR it is probable that the
amount of grain grown in the EU will fall, and indeed there looks to be a 15
million tonne shortfall anyway due to drought. Mind you the MTR could
produce a collapse in beef production anyway, which could further reduce EU
imports of maize.
The importation of Maize gluten is dropping more due to the fact that it is
a dried 'wet milling product' and its use is becoming more popular in the US
as a wet product. It is more profitable to sell maize gluten wet within the
US than it is to dry it and ship it.

Jim Webster




  #6   Report Post  
Old 18-08-2003, 07:24 AM
Jim Webster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)


wrote in message
...

On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 10:52:12 +0100, "Jim Webster"
wrote:

tonnes of GM maize have been imported into Europe and no one has noticed

any
difference


How many tonnes?


no one knows

Why are US farmers complaining that they have lost $200-$300 million
per annum in corn exports to Europe because of GMOs?


Unlikely, because last year maize exports fell to the UK because of a crop
shortage, the price for maize gluten went up from about 85 per tonne to
over
100 per tonne due to lack of availability.
There was a shortage of maize, which meant that for the first time in
history the UK managed to export feed wheat to the US.

In the long term, maize has been displaced by wheat in UK diets purely on
price, the last round of CAP reforms cut the market price of EU produced
feed wheat which made maize comparatively expensive for feed compounders
using 'least cost' formulations. When I was a kid cattle feed was basically
a mixture of maize and soya, which is something the UK industry hasn't been
able to afford for over thirty years. With the MTR it is probable that the
amount of grain grown in the EU will fall, and indeed there looks to be a 15
million tonne shortfall anyway due to drought. Mind you the MTR could
produce a collapse in beef production anyway, which could further reduce EU
imports of maize.
The importation of Maize gluten is dropping more due to the fact that it is
a dried 'wet milling product' and its use is becoming more popular in the US
as a wet product. It is more profitable to sell maize gluten wet within the
US than it is to dry it and ship it.

Jim Webster


  #7   Report Post  
Old 18-08-2003, 07:26 AM
Jim Webster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)


wrote in message
...

On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 10:52:12 +0100, "Jim Webster"
wrote:

tonnes of GM maize have been imported into Europe and no one has noticed

any
difference


How many tonnes?


no one knows

Why are US farmers complaining that they have lost $200-$300 million
per annum in corn exports to Europe because of GMOs?


Unlikely, because last year maize exports fell to the UK because of a crop
shortage, the price for maize gluten went up from about 85 per tonne to
over
100 per tonne due to lack of availability.
There was a shortage of maize, which meant that for the first time in
history the UK managed to export feed wheat to the US.

In the long term, maize has been displaced by wheat in UK diets purely on
price, the last round of CAP reforms cut the market price of EU produced
feed wheat which made maize comparatively expensive for feed compounders
using 'least cost' formulations. When I was a kid cattle feed was basically
a mixture of maize and soya, which is something the UK industry hasn't been
able to afford for over thirty years. With the MTR it is probable that the
amount of grain grown in the EU will fall, and indeed there looks to be a 15
million tonne shortfall anyway due to drought. Mind you the MTR could
produce a collapse in beef production anyway, which could further reduce EU
imports of maize.
The importation of Maize gluten is dropping more due to the fact that it is
a dried 'wet milling product' and its use is becoming more popular in the US
as a wet product. It is more profitable to sell maize gluten wet within the
US than it is to dry it and ship it.

Jim Webster


  #8   Report Post  
Old 20-08-2003, 04:02 AM
Mooshie peas
 
Posts: n/a
Default Animals avoid GM food (Was: biotech & famine)

On 17 Aug 2003 07:36:08 GMT, Brian Sandle
posted:

James Curts wrote:

The folks I, or those associated with our projects, deal with generally ask
for water, transportation and equipment and in about that order. This is
pertaining to food as we know that medical assistance is of high priority
also.


Seldom if ever do we get requests for seeds except to borrow or buy from a
nearby group of the same culture.


The increasing millions spent on experimenting is almost proportional to the
increasing hunger in the world.


This dilemma is not to be resolved by our huge corporations but by you and
I.


Linkname: GM Animal Feed
URL: http://www.btinternet.com/~clairejr/Animal/animal.html
size: 547 lines

[...]
Animals say no to GMO

There's a more serious problem with the idea of disposing of tonnes of
unsaleable GMOs into animal feed. Animals are refusing to eat it.

Recently, American journalist Steven Sprinkel recently spent four
months collecting reports from farmers growing GM crops. His article,
entitled "When The Corn Hits The Fan" details the following
observations:

* Cattle who were put out into GM corn stubble wouldn't touch it.
* Pigs wouldn't eat the ration when GM crops were included.
* A farmer said, "If you want your cattle to go off their feed, just
switch them out to a GM silage."
* A farmer said that his cattle broke through a fence and ate the
non-GM hybrids but wouldn't touch the GM Roundup Ready corn, even
though they had to walk through the GMs to get to the non-GMs on
the other side of the fence.
* A cattleman saw the weight-gain of his cattle fall off when he
switched to GM feed.
* An organic farmer with a terrible deer problem on his soybeans
found forty of them mowing down his tofu beans while across the
road there wasn't one eating the Roundup Ready GM soy.
* Raccoons romped by the dozen in a field of organic corn, while
down the road there wasn't one ear that had been touched in the Bt
fields.
* Even mice will move on down the line if given an alternative to GM
crops.

Sprinkel asks, "What is it that they know instinctively that most of
us ignore?" He predicts, "When the rotting corn hits the fan, it will
make a tremendous mess, with the debris lying equally on the tables of
the great leaders of the world as well as on the plates of consumers."

Bt crops: toxic harvest

There may be a particular problem with crops genetically engineered to
express the natural insecticide Bt. As long ago as March 1998, a
letter in Farmers Weekly reported that livestock on farms from
Nebraska to Iowa were not grazing normally in fields that contained GM
Bt corn.

Ohio farmer Leon Ridzon does not grow GMOs, but he deals with farmers
who do. He recounted local farmers' experience with Bt corn: "We first
had problems three years ago, when famers planted Bt corn and the cows
refused to eat it. The farmers had to camouflage it to get them to eat
it."

Maybe these cows are just finicky? Ridzon says not - other animals
won't eat Bt grain either: "The Bt corn was left on the cob and stored
in an open bin. The rabbits would not touch it, the squirrels would
not touch it. The rats and mice didn't go near it. It killed all the
spiders in the bins."

Ridzon has become increasingly suspicious about the possible toxicity
of Bt corn. His testimony is the more remarkable for the fact that the
norm for most Ohio farmers is intensively grown and chemically treated
corn - which the animals apparently prefer to GM Bt corn.

Ridzon confirms Sprinkel's account of reduced weight gain in Bt
corn-fed cattle. He says farmers report that cattle need nine pounds
of Bt corn to make a one pound weight gain as compared with only six
of normal corn.

Journalist Steven Sprinkel says that a major U.S. seed dealer told him
that there is evidence that earthworms are dying as a result of the
effects of Bt corn. Sprinkel comments, "This is not an activist
promoting the notion that GMO plants have unpredicated results. It's a
midwestern big seed dealer who would have more to gain by keeping
quiet, and much to lose if he got caught in a liability cross-fire. So
my assumption is that there is a big iceberg under these rumours and
chit-chat. Reasonable people are asking reasonable questions."

Waiting for science

These reports from farmers and seed dealers can easily be dismissed as
anecdotal evidence from which no conclusions can be drawn. But if we
wait for the scientists to catch up, it could be too late. Scientific
studies take years to do, and the majority are funded by industry or
governments greased with biotech dollars. Who is going to fund a study
which may find that a GM crop is toxic?
[...]



Greenie propaganda, and not even up to their usual poor standards.


 
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