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Old 25-03-2005, 03:45 PM
Elliot Richmond
 
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Default Mockingbird nest

There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor

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Old 25-03-2005, 06:20 PM
Katra
 
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In article ,
Elliot Richmond wrote:

There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor


You can place a sheet of 18" aluminum roof flashing about 3 ft. up the
base of the tree all the way around it as a "sleeve". This prevents
anything climbing the tree. It can be removed when they are done
nesting. :-)

Hope this helps?

Kat

--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

,,Cat's Haven Hobby Farm,,Katraatcenturyteldotnet,,


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra
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Old 25-03-2005, 06:28 PM
Elliot Richmond
 
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Default

On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:20:05 -0600, Katra
wrote:


You can place a sheet of 18" aluminum roof flashing about 3 ft. up the
base of the tree all the way around it as a "sleeve". This prevents
anything climbing the tree. It can be removed when they are done
nesting. :-)


Thanks. I had something like that in mind, but I seem to recall that
there was something that could be smeared on the trunk. Like grease,
only more benign.

Elliot

Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor
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Old 25-03-2005, 07:17 PM
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Elliot Richmond wrote:

On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:20:05 -0600, Katra
wrote:


You can place a sheet of 18" aluminum roof flashing about 3 ft. up the
base of the tree all the way around it as a "sleeve". This prevents
anything climbing the tree. It can be removed when they are done
nesting. :-)


Thanks. I had something like that in mind, but I seem to recall that
there was something that could be smeared on the trunk. Like grease,
only more benign.

Elliot

Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor


Ugh, but that's harder to remove!

The thing about the metal flashing is to not place it at the base of the
tree where it can be leapt above. By placing it a few feet up the tree,
the animal begins to climb then gets stuck.

I learned that trick for keeping climbing predators off of my pigeon
coop from a wildlife rescue group!

The flashing also comes in a brown color, or you can spray paint it if
you are concerned about how it looks.
--
K.
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Old 27-03-2005, 07:09 AM
steph
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Elliot Richmond" wrote in message
...
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor


Try something lemon-scented, or if you prefer and its not an expensive
option,try lemon juice. Cats hate citric smells and when I put my rubbish
bag out , I spray it with lemon-scented fly-spray. Spraying it around the
top keeps cats away, and spraying a lemon-scented flyspray around the body
of it detracts the birds. I don't know why it works, it just does. I don't
recommend this for a tree.For a tree, the lemon juice might be a better
option.
By the way, I don't think that I have ever seen a mockingbird. But when I
was - a lot -younger, I used to hear (Doris Day?) over the radio singing
something about "Tra-la-la, tweedley dee-dee,
there's peace and goodwill, you're welcome as the flowers on Mockingbird
Hill"

steph









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Old 30-03-2005, 02:47 AM
Robbin
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"steph" wrote in message
...
By the way, I don't think that I have ever seen a mockingbird.
steph


If you have never seen a mockingbird, then you must not live in Texas!





  #7   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 04:11 AM
cat daddy
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Robbin" wrote in message
...

"steph" wrote in message
...
By the way, I don't think that I have ever seen a mockingbird.
steph


If you have never seen a mockingbird, then you must not live in Texas!


I think the .nz for New Zealand might offer a clue....... }:-)


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Old 30-03-2005, 10:39 PM
Chris
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Just as an aside... Mockingbirds get very defensive of their nesting area,
and will attack you if you get within 25 or so feet. So, you might want to
think twice about them being there... I speak from a couple of experiences.
(I've developed a "dislike" towards them.)

"Elliot Richmond" wrote in message
...
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor



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Old 04-04-2005, 06:00 PM
The Holdermans
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Elliot Richmond wrote:
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor

WRAP CHICKEN WIRE AROUND THE BASE OF TREE.
  #10   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2005, 01:09 AM
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
The Holdermans wrote:

Elliot Richmond wrote:
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor

WRAP CHICKEN WIRE AROUND THE BASE OF TREE.


Chicken wire will NOT stop a cat.......
--
K.


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Old 05-04-2005, 04:46 AM
Elliot Richmond
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 19:09:44 -0500, Katra
wrote:

In article ,
The Holdermans wrote:
WRAP CHICKEN WIRE AROUND THE BASE OF TREE.


Chicken wire will NOT stop a cat.......


Thanks everyone. Problem solved. The mockingbirds abandoned the
project and moved on to a more secure location.



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor
  #12   Report Post  
Old 11-04-2005, 08:38 PM
g
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Katra,

Sometimes I wish so many cherished experiences in life had
not come my way, because I live in dread that somebody is
not going to believe me, after they've heard several.

In my neighborhood, we have the best neighbors in the world.
(Prior to moving here over thirty-five years ago, we had some
of the worst.) But I know them all. And NONE of them feeds
squirrels by hand. To feed them by hand is to invite them to
eat through the fascia boards of your house and take up residence
in your attic, and the damage they do there is DISASTROUS !

My backyard getaway (computerized private music studio for
composing, arranging, recording, enjoying email, etc.) is also
a hideaway among green, growing things.

One day, then the coffee mug bottomed out, I opened the door
to go up to the house for a refill and spotted a young squirrel
on a pine tree across the yard. We made eye contact. Seriously,
eye contact. I froze, just to enjoy the moment, hoping he/she
would go to the birdbath nearby, but he (let that gender suffice)
just kept looking me right in the eyes, as he came down the pine
and hopped toward me. (Most take off like a scalded dog.) He
came right up to me -- much to my astonishment -- and I knelt
down. He was within two feet and just stood there with his
head cocked to one side, as if to say, "What's your name?"

I held my right hand out, palm-up, closed all but the index finger
and reached forward. He put out his left front foot and put his
paw on top of the end of my finger. It felt cool.

I have seen squirrels beg for food, and have fed them, in parks
and such, where they have been fed enough to do that and NEVER
have I had one extend only one foot... and only then just to take
a nut, or whatever between both paws.

My impulse was to pet the squirrel -- even to pick it up as one
would a puppy or a kitten -- but I didn't want to frighten him.
After maybe half a minute, face-to-face, I decided to go on to
the house. As I stood and walked away, that little guy just stood
there as if to say, "Are you just going to leave me here?"

There is nothing bizarre about this story other than the fact it
was just so unlike a squirrel to behave this way.

Being unable to discern one squirrel from another, I don't know
if I've seen this particular one again, or not. But no further
incident of this kind has occurred. Normally when I go into
the yard, any squirrels there will scamper up a tree, or even run
from tree to tree, to put distance between us.

That one time -- whatever brought it about, or whatever it meant
to the squirrel -- is one of the cherished little moments of my life.
You and your mocking bird seem to have a more long-term
relationship. Good for you...

g


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Old 11-04-2005, 09:28 PM
g
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Elliott Richmond,

I've never written anything for publication. I merely write for the
share enjoyment of reliving some of experiences worth reliving
and sharing.

If I had to make a choice between writing for publication and
writing for the fun of it, I would choose the latter every time.

However, it would be fun to discuss some really exotic ideas about
science with someone who writes professionally.

One of my favorite pastimes (along with backpacking, boating,
camping...) is reading about some scientific subjects -- particularly
physics, astronomy. biology, chemistry, philosophy, psychology...
(just a list off the top of the head).

Please be assured I have no drum to beat, no agenda, very few
entrenched ideas... but enjoy learning new terms and concepts, and
fantasizing over "what if" scenarios with respect to alternate concepts
relating to space, time, light, and juxtapositions of idea with idea as,
for example, "What role do the human defense mechanisms influence
science beliefs at the popular level, at the political (financing) level,
and among scientists, themselves?"

It is hard to find people who share so many cross-discipline interests
and have had the motivation to delve into them. You seem to be a
person who would share these interests.

Research (of published documents) is something I do for a hobby;
and that might help you, while being just fun for me.

If interested in further discussion of this, let me know.

Gil
space and time and light.





"Chris" wrote in message
news
Just as an aside... Mockingbirds get very defensive of their nesting
area, and will attack you if you get within 25 or so feet. So, you might
want to think twice about them being there... I speak from a couple of
experiences. (I've developed a "dislike" towards them.)

"Elliot Richmond" wrote in message
...
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor





  #14   Report Post  
Old 12-04-2005, 12:22 AM
g
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Steph,

Who needed mocking birds, when they had Olivia Newton-John?

g
"steph" wrote in message
...

"Elliot Richmond" wrote in message
...
There is a mockingbird building a nest in one of the mountain laurels
in our front yard. There are also lots of loose cats in the
neighborhood. I know we have discussed cat deterrents here in the
past, but I can't find any of that information. Does anyone know of a
reliable, humane way to keep the cats out of that tree?

Of course, the mocking birds will do a good job during the day, but
most domestic house cats hunt at night.

Thanks



Elliot Richmond
Freelance Science Writer and Editor


Try something lemon-scented, or if you prefer and its not an expensive
option,try lemon juice. Cats hate citric smells and when I put my rubbish
bag out , I spray it with lemon-scented fly-spray. Spraying it around the
top keeps cats away, and spraying a lemon-scented flyspray around the
body
of it detracts the birds. I don't know why it works, it just does. I don't
recommend this for a tree.For a tree, the lemon juice might be a better
option.
By the way, I don't think that I have ever seen a mockingbird. But when I
was - a lot -younger, I used to hear (Doris Day?) over the radio singing
something about "Tra-la-la, tweedley dee-dee,
there's peace and goodwill, you're welcome as the flowers on Mockingbird
Hill"

steph









  #15   Report Post  
Old 12-04-2005, 09:10 AM
Katra
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net,
"g" wrote:

Katra,

Sometimes I wish so many cherished experiences in life had
not come my way, because I live in dread that somebody is
not going to believe me, after they've heard several.


I know the feeling. :-)


In my neighborhood, we have the best neighbors in the world.
(Prior to moving here over thirty-five years ago, we had some
of the worst.) But I know them all. And NONE of them feeds
squirrels by hand. To feed them by hand is to invite them to
eat through the fascia boards of your house and take up residence
in your attic, and the damage they do there is DISASTROUS !


I don't do that in my yard, and the dogs are good about keeping them
away from the house. But, some public parks have tame squirrels and it's
pretty neat. I just wish the little beasts were not so destructive! They
have damaged my greenhouse screen doors. :-P


My backyard getaway (computerized private music studio for
composing, arranging, recording, enjoying email, etc.) is also
a hideaway among green, growing things.

One day, then the coffee mug bottomed out, I opened the door
to go up to the house for a refill and spotted a young squirrel
on a pine tree across the yard. We made eye contact. Seriously,
eye contact. I froze, just to enjoy the moment, hoping he/she
would go to the birdbath nearby, but he (let that gender suffice)
just kept looking me right in the eyes, as he came down the pine
and hopped toward me. (Most take off like a scalded dog.) He
came right up to me -- much to my astonishment -- and I knelt
down. He was within two feet and just stood there with his
head cocked to one side, as if to say, "What's your name?"

I held my right hand out, palm-up, closed all but the index finger
and reached forward. He put out his left front foot and put his
paw on top of the end of my finger. It felt cool.


I wonder if it was a local rehab? That happens! One of my close friends
in Austin one day was at one of the parks there, and a baby racoon came
running out of nowhere, sat on her shoe and wrapped it's paws around her
ankle and started crying......

She brought it to us and we took it to WRI in Boerne. They have since
relocated to Kendalia. Great wildlife rescue group!


I have seen squirrels beg for food, and have fed them, in parks
and such, where they have been fed enough to do that and NEVER
have I had one extend only one foot... and only then just to take
a nut, or whatever between both paws.

My impulse was to pet the squirrel -- even to pick it up as one
would a puppy or a kitten -- but I didn't want to frighten him.
After maybe half a minute, face-to-face, I decided to go on to
the house. As I stood and walked away, that little guy just stood
there as if to say, "Are you just going to leave me here?"

There is nothing bizarre about this story other than the fact it
was just so unlike a squirrel to behave this way.

Being unable to discern one squirrel from another, I don't know
if I've seen this particular one again, or not. But no further
incident of this kind has occurred. Normally when I go into
the yard, any squirrels there will scamper up a tree, or even run
from tree to tree, to put distance between us.


Ditto here.


That one time -- whatever brought it about, or whatever it meant
to the squirrel -- is one of the cherished little moments of my life.
You and your mocking bird seem to have a more long-term
relationship. Good for you...

g


:-)
I adore my mockers! There is one pair that comes back here every year
and harrasses my dogs, and nests in the hackberry in the driveway.

When the babies are ready to leave the nest, we lock up the dogs to
protect them until they learn to fly. If I mess with them, the parent
birds fly at me and whap me in the back of the head! It's liked getting
bapped with a feather duster. No harm done, it's just disconcerting!





--
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

,,Cat's Haven Hobby Farm,,Katraatcenturyteldotnet,,


http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...user id=katra


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