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Old 05-04-2005, 02:19 PM
jw 111
 
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Default builders sand instead of horticultural sand

Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for pots?





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Old 05-04-2005, 06:38 PM
Katra
 
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In article ,
"jw 111" wrote:

Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for pots?





Depends on the type of "builders sand". I bought builders sand/sandy
loam as a base for my storage sheds.

Packed down like concrete after awhile just like I needed it to. :-)

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Old 05-04-2005, 08:45 PM
Tony
 
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You really cannot buy sand based on what it is called. I have to go look at
it and see it before I buy a few yards of it. The builders sand I bought
worked great in the garden, it was coarse. I have seen other "builder's
sand" that were nothing like it. It all depends on where it was aquired.
"jw 111" wrote in message
...
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather
than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for
pots?






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Old 06-04-2005, 12:19 AM
Don
 
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"jw 111" wrote in message
...
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather

than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for

pots?

I wonder if builders' sand sometimes might contain lime in it? It need not
have a neutral pH but might be quite alkaline.

regards
Don


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Old 06-04-2005, 09:07 AM
jw 111
 
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"Don" wrote in message
...
"jw 111" wrote in message
...
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather

than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for

pots?

I wonder if builders' sand sometimes might contain lime in it? It need not
have a neutral pH but might be quite alkaline.

regards
Don



Guess I could wash it in water small lots as needed for use, do you think?




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Old 06-04-2005, 09:49 AM
Katra
 
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In article ,
"jw 111" wrote:

"Don" wrote in message
...
"jw 111" wrote in message
...
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather

than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for

pots?

I wonder if builders' sand sometimes might contain lime in it? It need not
have a neutral pH but might be quite alkaline.

regards
Don



Guess I could wash it in water small lots as needed for use, do you think?



If it is limestone sand, I can't see that that would make much of a
difference? :-)

Have you asked the quarry what the source will be?
--
K.
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Old 06-04-2005, 01:10 PM
Gary Brady
 
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jw 111 wrote:
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for pots?


If you buy masonry sand at a supplier like MPI ($10 for 1/4 CY)you'll
get washed, graded sand. Should have no impurities and no lime. Other
types of "sand" could be a number of different things, such as sandy
loam, which has a much smaller actual sand content. I would think that
"horticultural" sand has been bagged and is conveniently available where
other sands are sold in bulk.



--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX

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Old 06-04-2005, 01:43 PM
Tex John
 
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If you buy masonry sand at a supplier like MPI ($10 for 1/4 CY)you'll
get washed, graded sand. Should have no impurities and no lime. Other
types of "sand" could be a number of different things,


Right.

What you don't want is PLAY sand in potting soil. That is river bottom sand
that has round edges. It doesn't have any points to it to create air pockets
in your pot.

Since you are near enough to the Gulf, make sure it doesn't smell salty.

I use builder's sand all the time. You just need to take an old window
screen and sift out the really fine particles so they don't clog up your air
pores.

John


"Gary Brady" wrote in message
nk.net...
jw 111 wrote:
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather

than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for

pots?

If you buy masonry sand at a supplier like MPI ($10 for 1/4 CY)you'll
get washed, graded sand. Should have no impurities and no lime. Other
types of "sand" could be a number of different things, such as sandy
loam, which has a much smaller actual sand content. I would think that
"horticultural" sand has been bagged and is conveniently available where
other sands are sold in bulk.



--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX



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Old 06-04-2005, 01:44 PM
Tex John
 
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England? See, I was wondering where "horticultural sand" came from...been
making my own soil for years and hadn't seen any.

John

"Gary Brady" wrote in message
nk.net...
jw 111 wrote:
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather

than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for

pots?

If you buy masonry sand at a supplier like MPI ($10 for 1/4 CY)you'll
get washed, graded sand. Should have no impurities and no lime. Other
types of "sand" could be a number of different things, such as sandy
loam, which has a much smaller actual sand content. I would think that
"horticultural" sand has been bagged and is conveniently available where
other sands are sold in bulk.



--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX



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Old 06-04-2005, 07:39 PM
Cindy
 
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"Tex John" wrote in message
...
If you buy masonry sand at a supplier like MPI ($10 for 1/4 CY)you'll
get washed, graded sand. Should have no impurities and no lime. Other
types of "sand" could be a number of different things,


Right.

What you don't want is PLAY sand in potting soil. That is river bottom
sand
that has round edges. It doesn't have any points to it to create air
pockets
in your pot.

Since you are near enough to the Gulf, make sure it doesn't smell salty.

I use builder's sand all the time. You just need to take an old window
screen and sift out the really fine particles so they don't clog up your
air
pores.

John


Play sand is also too fine.
I get sand at Home Depot. I like really coarse stuff, and lately I've been
finding it near the pool supplies. They sell it for sand filters. More
expensive, but I don't need THAT much.

Cindy




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Old 06-04-2005, 08:00 PM
Tex John
 
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"Cindy" wrote in message
m...
Play sand is also too fine.
I get sand at Home Depot. I like really coarse stuff, and lately I've

been
finding it near the pool supplies. They sell it for sand filters. More
expensive, but I don't need THAT much.


I usually get mine at Home Depot in bags by the mortar and cement. One year,
tho, just grabbed a bag from outside in front of the store without reading
the label. Was not washed, was salty, and killed a couple of plants :/

A few years ago a friend built a porch in his back yard and had a yard of
sand left over on his driveway. I wheel-barrowed it away (for free) and
sifted it at my house...free was good and was enough for a few year's worth
of bonsai re-pottings. Although for bonsai soil, I sift out the fines AND
the large pieces. Amazing how heavy a 'recycle bin' is when it is full of
pure sand fines!

John


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Old 14-04-2005, 10:57 PM
Keith
 
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There are two types of builders sand
soft for use in mortar no good for gardening the edges of the sand
particles are rounded off giving poor drainage.

Sharp sand for use in fine Concrete floor screeds etc.
This is ideal for potting composts and general gardening use it is
normally washed before delivery to removes salts etc. that could
comprimises its use in Concrete.

Sharp sand has sharp edges providing good drainage I have just dug five
tons into a bed I am preparing for some Lilies.

jw 111 wrote:
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for pots?




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Old 15-04-2005, 03:30 AM
Cindy
 
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Sharp sand has sharp edges providing good drainage I have just dug five
tons into a bed I am preparing for some Lilies.


FIVE TONS! Well if you didn't have a strong back before, it is now, huh?



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Old 15-04-2005, 09:55 PM
Keith
 
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Ah well it makes a change from typing all day, which is what my IT
management role has now become, email after email.........

Working from home has its benefits though as I can potter in the Garden
at lunch times.

5 tons is not that much and I do have a Camon C8 Rotavator to dig it in
with.

If only it would stop raining! long enough to allow the ground to dry
sufficiently to finish the job but then this would not be rural England
without a wee bit of rain

I bought 200 lilies in tens of named varieties from Tompson and Morgan
all are now potted and under glass for now but they will look good in
the long border that I am preparing or I will be a tad unhappy.

rgds
Keith

Cindy wrote:
Sharp sand has sharp edges providing good drainage I have just dug five
tons into a bed I am preparing for some Lilies.



FIVE TONS! Well if you didn't have a strong back before, it is now, huh?



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Old 24-08-2005, 10:32 AM
Geoff
 
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Default


"jw 111" wrote in message
...
Is there really any reason why builders sand should not be used rather
than
the more expensive horticultural sand, in making up a soil mixture for
pots?


Go to B & Q and buy some of their sharp sand. Do not used anything except
sharp sand and it might be a good idea to wash it with plenty of water
before use. If you're an amateur laying bricks it's best not to use sharp
sand - I tried it, but only once! You could also add a little builders grit
(likewise washed of course) to your mixture if there's a lack of small
stones in the other constituents.

Geoff





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