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Old 29-07-2005, 10:41 PM
john
 
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Default Large Tree - not so large pot?

I've been cutting back on anything that causes
repetitive work in the garden. One of the idea
- much that I dislike it - is to use gravel (ugh!)
Now I wish to place pots on two patches which were
flower beds.

My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)

What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden" not that my parch is small.

I live in Plymouth - God's own country - in the
South West of England. Balmy summers with sufficient
rain & mild winters, in fact all things which are conducive
to good plant growth.

I'd appreciate advice and guidance with the whole concept

Many thanks.

John.


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Old 29-07-2005, 11:46 PM
pammyT
 
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"john" wrote in message
...
I've been cutting back on anything that causes
repetitive work in the garden. One of the idea
- much that I dislike it - is to use gravel (ugh!)
Now I wish to place pots on two patches which were
flower beds.

My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)

What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden" not that my parch is small.

I live in Plymouth - God's own country - in the
South West of England. Balmy summers with sufficient
rain & mild winters, in fact all things which are conducive
to good plant growth.

I'd appreciate advice and guidance with the whole concept

Many thanks.

John.

But why put them in pots? They will need more attention than if they were
in the ground?
You can cut a slit in the membrane you will be putting down under the
gravel and plant the tree through the slit.


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Old 30-07-2005, 08:09 AM
john
 
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On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 22:46:14 +0100, "pammyT" fenlandfowl
@talktalk.net wrote:


"john" wrote in message
.. .
I've been cutting back on anything that causes
repetitive work in the garden. One of the idea
- much that I dislike it - is to use gravel (ugh!)
Now I wish to place pots on two patches which were
flower beds.

My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)

What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden" not that my parch is small.

I live in Plymouth - God's own country - in the
South West of England. Balmy summers with sufficient
rain & mild winters, in fact all things which are conducive
to good plant growth.

I'd appreciate advice and guidance with the whole concept

Many thanks.

John.

But why put them in pots? They will need more attention than if they were
in the ground?
You can cut a slit in the membrane you will be putting down under the
gravel and plant the tree through the slit.
===============================================

Thank you for your response.

In answer;
by keeping a tree in a pot I can have it
safely sited much closer to my bungalow. When I pop
my clogs, the next owner will not be bothered by
having to move a tree as a first duty to his or her
beautiful garden. ( Not being morbid, just practical :-)

Secondly, it's a project I've never got round to
carry out. Also it's a challenge.

Cheers.

John
===========================================


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Old 30-07-2005, 08:52 AM
Christopher Norton
 
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The message
from john contains these words:

I've been cutting back on anything that causes
repetitive work in the garden. One of the idea
- much that I dislike it - is to use gravel (ugh!)
Now I wish to place pots on two patches which were
flower beds.


My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)


What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden" not that my parch is small.


I live in Plymouth - God's own country - in the
South West of England. Balmy summers with sufficient
rain & mild winters, in fact all things which are conducive
to good plant growth.


I'd appreciate advice and guidance with the whole concept


Many thanks.


John.


Just consider them large Bonsai so most trees will do fine in a large pot.

The list is so extensive I could`nt even start. Whatever tree you like
you can grow in a pot.
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Old 30-07-2005, 08:59 AM
Christopher Norton
 
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Default

The message
from john contains these words:

---------snippped-----------------------

Thank you for your response.


In answer;
by keeping a tree in a pot I can have it
safely sited much closer to my bungalow. When I pop
my clogs, the next owner will not be bothered by
having to move a tree as a first duty to his or her
beautiful garden. ( Not being morbid, just practical :-)


Secondly, it's a project I've never got round to
carry out. Also it's a challenge.


Cheers.


John
===========================================


I know I said I was`nt going to do a list but heres what I have in 5
gallon pots at the moment.

Prunus Mume - Flowering Apricot (has never flowered yet)
Silver Birch - was given a harsh trunk chop last winter and has since
gone berserk!!!!!
Two purple leaved beech
two Hornbeams
one english oak
one Acer buergeranum - trident maple (do not confuse with the japanese
maples)
one Acer pseudoplantanus - aka an english Sycamore

put the last two in the list just to prove that all Acers should`nt be
tarred with the image of japanese ones.

One things for certain. You`ll have fun choosing your trees.


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Old 30-07-2005, 10:03 PM
Rupert
 
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Default


"john" wrote in message
...
I've been cutting back on anything that causes
repetitive work in the garden. One of the idea
- much that I dislike it - is to use gravel (ugh!)
Now I wish to place pots on two patches which were
flower beds.

My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)

What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden" not that my parch is small.

I live in Plymouth - God's own country - in the
South West of England. Balmy summers with sufficient
rain & mild winters, in fact all things which are conducive
to good plant growth.

I'd appreciate advice and guidance with the whole concept

Many thanks.

John.



Most trees (if not all ) will grow quite well in a pot.
Once the tree has filled the avaialble space it ceases to grow upwards and
will live quite happily with a bit of water and an occasional feed.

It's best to bury the pot or make it very secure if above ground because the
wind will topple even a small tree .






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Old 01-08-2005, 12:22 PM
Ornata
 
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Default

The message
from john contains these words:


My question is ... from your personal experience,
which trees will take kindly to being grown in
pots? (Not Acers please)
What size pot is best suited to make a home
for tree which is laughingly known as " suitable
for a small garden"


I planted up a bare-root young Sorbus aucuparia (there are other more
ornamental varieties but this was an experiment so I went for the
cheapest) in a large plastic container - not sure what size exactly,
but about 18 inches depth. I used a loam-based compost mixed with some
perlite to help with aeration. I also have a pot-grown Malus
'Gorgeous'. Both seem to be doing well. The Malus flowered well this
year and has set a lot of fruit. Despite it being such a terribly dry
year, they haven't needed watering every day. I'd go for small trees
that have more than one season of interest (e.g. spring flowers, autumn
fruit, autumn colour). Amalanchier would be good; it has bronze new
growth, starry white flowers in spring followed by black fruits, and
lovely orange/red autumn colour. Or try something like an Acer
pennsylvanicum 'Erythrocladum', which has bright red and white striped
bark (again, not a Japanese maple).

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Old 01-08-2005, 09:11 PM
john
 
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Default

On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 07:59:30 +0100, Christopher Norton
wrote:

The message
from john contains these words:

---------snippped-----------------------

Thank you for your response.


In answer;
by keeping a tree in a pot I can have it
safely sited much closer to my bungalow. When I pop
my clogs, the next owner will not be bothered by
having to move a tree as a first duty to his or her
beautiful garden. ( Not being morbid, just practical :-)


Secondly, it's a project I've never got round to
carry out. Also it's a challenge.


Cheers.


John
===========================================


I know I said I was`nt going to do a list but heres what I have in 5
gallon pots at the moment.

Prunus Mume - Flowering Apricot (has never flowered yet)
Silver Birch - was given a harsh trunk chop last winter and has since
gone berserk!!!!!
Two purple leaved beech
two Hornbeams
one english oak
one Acer buergeranum - trident maple (do not confuse with the japanese
maples)
one Acer pseudoplantanus - aka an english Sycamore

put the last two in the list just to prove that all Acers should`nt be
tarred with the image of japanese ones.

One things for certain. You`ll have fun choosing your trees.

=================================================
Many thanks Christopher.

I particularly like the Silver Birch - in my humble opinion
one of the most beautiful of trees when mature.

The English Oak is a must and perhaps one of the hornbeams.

As a matter of interest at what size did you pot up your
selection and did you purchase or pick a self-sown sapling?

Many moons ago I planted a self sown Sycamore in the
garden of a house in Hampshire where I lived at that time.
Visiting the area a couple of years ago it was still in
situ surrounded by a dry stone circular wall which I built
at the time of the planting. It was enormous and still
extremely healthy. Made me feel that I'd achieved
something really worthwhile.

Thanks again.

John.
======================================





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