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Old 30-03-2003, 10:56 AM
AWM
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase -- what
are the pit falls ?



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Old 30-03-2003, 07:32 PM
Alan Gould
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

In article , AWM
eeserve.co.uk writes
I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase -- what
are the pit falls ?

Fruiting cherries are varieties of Prunus and they will do well in most
areas of UK given a little attention occasionally. Once they are
properly established, i.e. after 2 or 3 years, they will give good crops
of fruit annually unless they are caught out by a late frost. They
become vigorous in growth and need to be pruned for size regularly.

The pit falls are protecting the ripening cherries from birds just prior
to picking. They can be picked under-ripe for finishing indoors, but a
lot of flavour and texture is lost by doing that. We put two or three CD
bird scarers among the branches to good effect at the earlier stage of
fruit ripening, then some horticultural fleece over the cherries as they
begin to change colour. That way we succeed in catching most of the
crop. We eat a lot, freeze a lot and give a lot away, it's great fun!
--
Alan & Joan Gould - North Lincs.
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Old 30-03-2003, 08:32 PM
Rod
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries


"AWM" wrote in message ...
I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase -- what
are the pit falls ?

None - you get to eat them or the local birds do, a win win situation.
Ask for trees on dwarfing or semi dwarfing rootstocks, they will stay small enough to make cageing or netting a
practical proposition. Just check you're not in a frost pocket or if you are see if you can make a route for cold air
to drain away. The trees are tough as old boots but spring frost or late snow can catch the blossom.

Rod


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Old 30-03-2003, 09:20 PM
subbykins{Chrd}
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 19:30:29 +0100, "Rod"
wrote:

None - you get to eat them or the local birds do, a win win situation.
Ask for trees on dwarfing or semi dwarfing rootstocks, they will stay small enough to make cageing or netting a
practical proposition. Just check you're not in a frost pocket or if you are see if you can make a route for cold air
to drain away. The trees are tough as old boots but spring frost or late snow can catch the blossom.

Rod


Really dim question here, but we've got what looks like a very young
cherry tree (only a few branches) that's budding leaves right now.
There's been no sign of blossom, is it possible it's still to come?
Last year it produced the grand total of one cherry.

"The only time you don't fail is the last time you try anything -- and it
works."

- William Strong

subbykins{Chrd}


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Old 30-03-2003, 10:08 PM
Rod
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries


"subbykins{Chrd}" wrote in message
Really dim question here, but we've got what looks like a very young
cherry tree (only a few branches) that's budding leaves right now.
There's been no sign of blossom, is it possible it's still to come?
Last year it produced the grand total of one cherry.


Looks like you won't get your cherry this year;~(((

That's not uncommon in young trees. It will take a few years to reach its full potential. Time depends to some extent on
rootstock as well as other factors - trees on dwarfing stocks tend to come into production sooner.

Rod




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Old 30-03-2003, 11:32 PM
Tumbleweed
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries


"AWM" wrote in message
...
I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase -- what
are the pit falls ?

One word. Birds. I have had one cherry off our cherry tree in the 9 years I
have lived in my house. I'd advise something else if the idea is to eat them
(the cherries, not the birds. If you want to eat birds, then cherries will
do well for attracting them)

--
Tumbleweed

Remove my socks before replying (but no email reply necessary to newsgroups)



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Old 31-03-2003, 09:56 AM
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries


"Tumbleweed" wrote in message
...

"AWM" wrote in message
...
I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase --

what
are the pit falls ?

One word. Birds. I have had one cherry off our cherry tree in the 9 years

I
have lived in my house. I'd advise something else if the idea is to eat

them
(the cherries, not the birds. If you want to eat birds, then cherries will
do well for attracting them)


Exactly. We had a large (15ft spread) Morello cherry tree at a previous
house. One day you would go out and see cherries starting to ripen. Next day
you would go out and find stalks.

Colin Bignell


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Old 31-03-2003, 03:20 PM
Dwayne
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

Buy a yellow fruited cherry. Fools the birds every time.
Don't know if you have them there, but we have Peach tree borers here. They
will kill peach trees and sweet cherry trees. They haven't seemed to bother
tart cherry trees, or at least not as quickley.

Good luck. Dwayne


"AWM" wrote in message
...
I live close to the clyde valley soft growing area and spring flowering
cherry trees do exceptionally well in my local area , but I have seen
various cherry varieties intended for fruit in my local Homebase -- what
are the pit falls ?




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Old 01-04-2003, 02:56 PM
Victoria Clare
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

"Dwayne" wrote in
:

Buy a yellow fruited cherry. Fools the birds every time.
Don't know if you have them there, but we have Peach tree borers here.
They will kill peach trees and sweet cherry trees. They haven't
seemed to bother tart cherry trees, or at least not as quickley.


What a good idea! I am thinking of buying some cherries next year - any
yellow-fruited varieties you'd recommend?

Victoria
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Old 05-04-2003, 06:08 AM
Dwayne
 
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Default Growing fruit Cherries

No. I have never raised them, just read about them. Get a catalog and see
what they have that will work in your area and try one or two. Dwayne


"Victoria Clare" wrote in message
.217...
"Dwayne" wrote in
:

Buy a yellow fruited cherry. Fools the birds every time.
Don't know if you have them there, but we have Peach tree borers here.
They will kill peach trees and sweet cherry trees. They haven't
seemed to bother tart cherry trees, or at least not as quickley.


What a good idea! I am thinking of buying some cherries next year - any
yellow-fruited varieties you'd recommend?

Victoria





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