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Old 08-03-2006, 11:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Colin Spooner
 
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Default Mercury lamps in greenhouse?

I have 2 mercury lamps from when I used to keeptropical marine fish in an
aquarium.
As these lamps are supposed to replicate sunlight,I was wondering if they
could be used to germinate seeds in the greenhouse when the natural light
levels are still low?
I hear cannabis plants are grown in secrecy using this method indoors --
for obvious reasons!!
just a thought



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Old 08-03-2006, 11:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
michael adams
 
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Default Mercury lamps in greenhouse?


"Colin Spooner" wrote in message
...

I have 2 mercury lamps from when I used to keeptropical marine fish in an
aquarium.
As these lamps are supposed to replicate sunlight,I was wondering if they
could be used to germinate seeds in the greenhouse when the natural light
levels are still low?



If seeds needed light to germinate, which most don't, it would be
easier to simply sow them on the surface of the compost. Rather
than bury them one seed deep, which is the normal recommendation
for most species.

If you're going to use artificial light to bring on plants earlier,
it would probably be cheaper to do it indoors where there will
presumably already be sufficient heat.


michael adams

....








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Old 09-03-2006, 11:37 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
John McMillan
 
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Default Mercury lamps in greenhouse?

In article , "michael adams"
wrote:

"Colin Spooner" wrote in message
...

I have 2 mercury lamps from when I used to keeptropical marine fish in an
aquarium.
As these lamps are supposed to replicate sunlight,I was wondering if they
could be used to germinate seeds in the greenhouse when the natural light
levels are still low?



If seeds needed light to germinate, which most don't, it would be
easier to simply sow them on the surface of the compost. Rather
than bury them one seed deep, which is the normal recommendation
for most species.

If you're going to use artificial light to bring on plants earlier,
it would probably be cheaper to do it indoors where there will
presumably already be sufficient heat.



You'll find temperature much more important for most species
than light levels. Norman Deno's books "Theory and Practice
of Seed Germination" are probably the best single source of information
on germination needs of different species.
Having said that, if you actually do need light for germination or you're
trying to grow Welwitschias or something that needs a lot of
light then your surplus mercury lights will do fine.
As will most other lights including cheapo fluorescent strips from B&Q.
There is a good deal of manure spread on the subject of grow-lights and their
spectral emission. Most plants don't care much and I think the
whole market is driven by cannabis cultivators and more particularly
those entrepreneurs who supply them.
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Old 12-03-2006, 10:21 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Rod Craddock
 
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Default Mercury lamps in greenhouse?

"Colin Spooner" wrote in message
...
I have 2 mercury lamps from when I used to keeptropical marine fish
in an aquarium.
As these lamps are supposed to replicate sunlight,I was wondering if
they could be used to germinate seeds in the greenhouse when the
natural light levels are still low?
I hear cannabis plants are grown in secrecy using this method
indoors -- for obvious reasons!!
just a thought

No reason why not, though it's not usually cost effective unless
you're specialising in a high value crop whose light requirements you
understand very well. If you are sowing seeds that are going to
germinate before light levels are sufficient for good growth, chances
are your plants are going to be ready to go outside or will be needing
more space than you can give them inside while it's still too cold to
put them out. I've found that for my purposes at any rate, earlyish
veg production and the usual spring bedding suspects artificial light
isn't worth the bother.
--
Rod

My real address is rodtheweedygardeneratmyweedyisp
Just remove the weedy bits
and transplant the appropriate symbol at.




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