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Old 09-10-2006, 08:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?

Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in the
old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a patio
cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid a lawn of
fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law and uses it for
that purpose now. :-)

--
Regards
Bob H
17mls W. of London.UK



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Old 09-10-2006, 08:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Bob Hobden wrote:
Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in the
old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a patio
cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid a lawn of
fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law and uses it for
that purpose now. :-)


A friend put down a plastic sheet all around the ring she had in her
lawn (her parents lawn actually - she would never get rid of hers),
forming a circle from the ring to about 1m wide outwards. The spores of
the fungi 'fly' outwards (hence the rings usually getting bigger year
after year) and were collected in the sheet. She did this over two
seasons and the fungis desappeared without using any chemicals. Sorry
Bob, but you know me .... )

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Old 09-10-2006, 08:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?

In article , Bob Hobden
writes
Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in
the old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a
patio cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid
a lawn of fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law
and uses it for that purpose now. :-)

If you look on www.armillatox.co.uk you will find that it can't be used
for this purpose in Europe but if you go to www.armillatox.com you will
see how the rest of the world are able to use it. This will probably
help your friend not to mis-use it effectively.

Regards, Colin
--
Colin Brook - Winchester (UK)

Tel:+44(0)1962-714030 Fax:+44(0)8701641293 Mobile:07976258703
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Old 09-10-2006, 10:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


"La Puce" wrote in message
oups.com...

Bob Hobden wrote:
Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in

the
old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a patio
cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid a lawn

of
fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law and uses it

for
that purpose now. :-)


A friend put down a plastic sheet all around the ring she had in her
lawn (her parents lawn actually - she would never get rid of hers),
forming a circle from the ring to about 1m wide outwards. The spores of
the fungi 'fly' outwards (hence the rings usually getting bigger year
after year) and were collected in the sheet.



The mushrooms in fairy rings are simply the visble evidence of fungal
strands
or mycelium which spread in the soil to a depth of 10 to 12 inches.
They don't propogate on the surface at all, so a plastic sheet could be
of no possible use.


michael adams



She did this over two
seasons and the fungis desappeared without using any chemicals. Sorry
Bob, but you know me .... )



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Old 09-10-2006, 10:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
K K is offline
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Default Armilotox, what strength?

michael adams writes

"La Puce" wrote in message
roups.com...


A friend put down a plastic sheet all around the ring she had in her
lawn (her parents lawn actually - she would never get rid of hers),
forming a circle from the ring to about 1m wide outwards. The spores of
the fungi 'fly' outwards (hence the rings usually getting bigger year
after year) and were collected in the sheet.



The mushrooms in fairy rings are simply the visble evidence of fungal
strands
or mycelium which spread in the soil to a depth of 10 to 12 inches.
They don't propogate on the surface at all, so a plastic sheet could be
of no possible use.

By coincidence, I was at a talk yesterday by one of the country's
leading mycologists. The fungus grows steadily outwards, fruiting around
the outside, hence the expanding ring. You can form an estimate of the
age of the fungus but the diameter of the ring of fruiting bodies.

Since the spores aren't propelled in any way by the fungus, they are
dependent on air currents for their dispersal. It's hard to envisage a
mechanism whereby they would be carried outwards only.

If putting a plastic sheet down killed the fungus, then it wasn't by the
mechanism described.

--
Kay


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Old 09-10-2006, 11:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


"Colin Brook" replied to Bob Hobden who wrote

Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in
the old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a
patio cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid a
lawn of fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law and
uses it for that purpose now. :-)


If you look on www.armillatox.co.uk you will find that it can't be used
for this purpose in Europe but if you go to www.armillatox.com you will
see how the rest of the world are able to use it. This will probably help
your friend not to mis-use it effectively.


Excellent, thank you Colin.

--
Regards
Bob H
17mls W. of London.UK


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Old 10-10-2006, 09:57 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


K wrote:
By coincidence, I was at a talk yesterday by one of the country's
leading mycologists. The fungus grows steadily outwards, fruiting around
the outside, hence the expanding ring. You can form an estimate of the
age of the fungus but the diameter of the ring of fruiting bodies.


Since the spores aren't propelled in any way by the fungus, they are
dependent on air currents for their dispersal. It's hard to envisage a
mechanism whereby they would be carried outwards only.
If putting a plastic sheet down killed the fungus, then it wasn't by the
mechanism described.


There's something to do with the nutrients that the mushrooms seek in
the soil hence them moving outwards and spores falling on depleted soil
wouldn't do well. I think that's the mechanism for the fungis to move
outwards. The spores collecting are an option, an organic one, which
works. Off course there's the wind, hence the 1m sheet outwards.

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Old 10-10-2006, 10:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


"La Puce" wrote in message
oups.com...

K wrote:
By coincidence, I was at a talk yesterday by one of the country's
leading mycologists. The fungus grows steadily outwards, fruiting around
the outside, hence the expanding ring. You can form an estimate of the
age of the fungus but the diameter of the ring of fruiting bodies.


Since the spores aren't propelled in any way by the fungus, they are
dependent on air currents for their dispersal. It's hard to envisage a
mechanism whereby they would be carried outwards only.
If putting a plastic sheet down killed the fungus, then it wasn't by the
mechanism described.


There's something to do with the nutrients that the mushrooms seek in
the soil hence them moving outwards and spores falling on depleted soil
wouldn't do well.


....

Fairy rings have nothing to do with spores

As was pointed our previously, the mushrooms are produced by the mycelium
which is between 12 and 15 inches underground. The mycelium is the main
fungal body. Its the mycelium which pushes outwards which produce
mushrooms, nit mushrooms which produce the mycelium. Spores merely enable
fungi to colonise new areas with no mycyleum alreadt present.

quote

Understanding fairy rings requires an understanding of how mushrooms
grow. Like apples on an apple tree, the "mushrooms" we see are only
the reproductive fruit bodies of the "true" organism, which is called
a mycelium. The mycelium grows underground; it is a mass of elongated,
hungry cells that feed on nutrients, pushing and growing through the
substrate as long as there is food available.

When the substrate is evenly composed--that is, when the food supply is
constant and uninterrupted--the mycelium grows ever-outward, leaving
behind the nutrient-poor substrate it has consumed and pushing into new
territory. If the mycelium decides to produce mushrooms, the result is
a fairy ring. Many species produce mushrooms more or less annually.

quote

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/fairy_rings.html


michael adams

....



I think that's the mechanism for the fungis to move
outwards. The spores collecting are an option, an organic one, which
works. Off course there's the wind, hence the 1m sheet outwards.



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Old 10-10-2006, 10:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


michael adams wrote:
As was pointed our previously, the mushrooms are produced by the mycelium
which is between 12 and 15 inches underground. The mycelium is the main
fungal body. Its the mycelium which pushes outwards which produce
mushrooms, nit mushrooms which produce the mycelium. Spores merely enable
fungi to colonise new areas with no mycyleum alreadt present.


But why, like fairy rings mushrooms, other field fungis do not grow in
rings?

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Default Armilotox, what strength?


"La Puce" wrote in message
ps.com...

michael adams wrote:
As was pointed our previously, the mushrooms are produced by the

mycelium
which is between 12 and 15 inches underground. The mycelium is the main
fungal body. Its the mycelium which pushes outwards which produce
mushrooms, nit mushrooms which produce the mycelium. Spores merely

enable
fungi to colonise new areas with no mycyleum alreadt present.


But why, like fairy rings mushrooms, other field fungis do not grow in
rings?



4 paragraphs on from the previous quote -

quote

Just about any terrestrial mushroom can pop up in fairy rings. What is
required is simply an evenly composed substrate. Since lawns are tended
environments created by people whose goal is an evenly composed substrate,
they are frequent fairy ring sites for grass-loving mushrooms like
Marasmius oreades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, and Agaricus campestris.

Woods are messier than lawns, and involve territory that is usually not
very consistent in its composition--but every so often one finds a ring
or partial ring created by a woodland species in a rare patch of stable
environment; I have seen species of Amanita and Russula, for example,
fruiting in large arcs in the woods.

/quote

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/fairy_rings.html


michael adams






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Old 10-10-2006, 11:12 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


"Bob Hobden" wrote in message
...
Friend wants to rid his lawn of a number of fairy rings, I suggested in
the old days he could have used Armilatox, what is now sold as just a
patio cleaner, but what strength did one use it at in those days to rid a
lawn of fungi? I'm not suggesting for one moment he breaks the law and
uses it for that purpose now. :-)



http://www.armillatox.com/fairy.htm

Armillatox - Fairy Rings

Dilution: 50:1
Coverage: as applicable

Fairy rings are portrayed by a deeper coloured ring in the lawn enriched by
decaying fungi.

The mycelium underground spreads outwards gradually widening like ripples on
a pond after a stone has been thrown into the water.

Many gardeners have used the following technique with great success:

Using a fork or auger, make a ring of holes in the unaffected turf 10 cms
from the Fairy Ring.

Thoroughly drench with the diluted solution pouring directly into each hole,
either with a watering can or a Compression Sprayer, fitted with an injector
lance.

If any of the solution overflows from the hole onto the surface grass,
lightly water the area with plain water, using a watering can.

The area within the ring may contain small toadstool-like fungi. Remove and
burn.

Back to Home Page



pk



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Default Armilotox, what strength?


michael adams wrote:
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/fairy_rings.html


Thank you - wonderful site. I was interested with the quote "What
triggers mushroom production is rather up for debate. Studies indicate
that many fungi--the morels, for example--produce fruit bodies when
they face nutrient deprivation, sort of as a survival strategy: "I'm
done for, so I'll make a mushroom that is covered with spores, lift it
up above the ground, and let the wind take my babies to a new home."
This explanation doesn't seem to fit the mushrooms that make fairy
rings, however, since they have not run out of food." Could it be that
in some very poor lawn (urban gardens), the survival instinct kicks in?

All this made me terribly hungry ....

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Old 14-10-2006, 07:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"La Puce" wrote in message
roups.com...



I think that's the mechanism for the fungis to move
outwards. The spores collecting are an option, an organic one, which
works. Off course there's the wind, hence the 1m sheet outwards.



Spores are light enough to be carried far more than 1m by the lightest
of breezes. Are you suggesting that if you can keep them from landing
within 1m of the ring, that is sufficient to prevent further growth?
--
Kay
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Old 14-10-2006, 10:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Armilotox, what strength?


K wrote:
Spores are light enough to be carried far more than 1m by the lightest
of breezes. Are you suggesting that if you can keep them from landing
within 1m of the ring, that is sufficient to prevent further growth?


The parents of my friend have a small urban garden. I suspect that's
why she used a small sheet. But I really don't know more. In such a
small garden and a minute lawn, I'd imagine she'd be more successful at
catching spores, which needs to land on the best location for them -
and since the space is small that was the best way to do it. I haven't
got hold of her yet. I know she's got a job with the Oldham and
Rochdale Groundwork now.

My neighbour has had a ring, or perhaps a crescent for about 3/4 years.
But she likes it very much. She also has lots of sculptures of fairies
dotted about in the garden. You won't find these in mine ;o)



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