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Old 31-10-2006, 12:28 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?
Any tips, or hints to make it easier?
Woman's Hour said the hips are better after a frost, but I went ahead
anyway.
Apparently in Scandinavia "they" swear by it for their joints.
The price of the magic substance, litozin, makes the work worth while!

Pam in Bristol

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Old 31-10-2006, 05:44 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?
Any tips, or hints to make it easier?
Woman's Hour said the hips are better after a frost, but I went ahead
anyway.
Apparently in Scandinavia "they" swear by it for their joints.
The price of the magic substance, litozin, makes the work worth while!

Pam in Bristol


I'd imagine that the frost helps to soften the hips - maybe the structure
breaks down with freezing?
Perhaps they need that - like sprouts ?

Jenny


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Old 31-10-2006, 07:52 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of

jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?


I've made a lot of rose hip jely over the years. I just boil up the
hips, drain overnight through a jelly bag (made from on old pillow
slip and using an upside down stool where the jelly bag hangs from the
legs and drips into a bowl). I then add the sugar to the liquid next
day and boil till it jels. Not difficult with a jelly bag but I would
imagine it's hell on wheels without one.


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Old 31-10-2006, 09:33 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


"Farm1" [email protected] wrote in message
...
"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of

jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?


I've made a lot of rose hip jely over the years. I just boil up the
hips, drain overnight through a jelly bag (made from on old pillow
slip and using an upside down stool where the jelly bag hangs from the
legs and drips into a bowl). I then add the sugar to the liquid next
day and boil till it jels. Not difficult with a jelly bag but I would
imagine it's hell on wheels without one.


Very similar to making crab apple jelly - I use a pair of tights as a jelly
bag

Jeanne


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Old 31-10-2006, 12:21 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?


I've done it for years, there IS a lot of preparation and washing up
involved but nothing worth doing is easy :-)

Any tips, or hints to make it easier?


I don't 'go collecting' hips, we have a wild rose in the garden and I use
its fruit. I'm torn between seeing the jewelled, arching branches through
the winter and possibly depriving birds (although there are a lot of other
berries around) and being self indulgent. This year I'll have the visual
delight because I have enough syrup and jelly left from last year and had
toe surgery last week which means I can't stand for long.

I use a huge pan and don't cut the fruit before it goes in. When it's soft I
put it in the blender then strain it roughly in a sieve and afterwards in a
very fine nylon (honey straining!) bag - overnight.

Woman's Hour said the hips are better after a frost, but I went ahead
anyway.


They're not as pretty after a frost and it's easy to think they've been
spoilt and discard them.

Apparently in Scandinavia "they" swear by it for their joints.


They lie! My joints aren't helped :-(

The price of the magic substance, litozin, makes the work worth while!


I use them because I can't bear waste and because I love the product. Jelly
is best but I often bottle some as syrup to use (diluted with cold water and
ice) as a summer drink. It's also good diluted with hot water for a warm
winter drink.

Mary

Pam in Bristol





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Old 31-10-2006, 12:25 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

Mary Fisher wrote:
"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?


I've done it for years, there IS a lot of preparation and washing up
involved but nothing worth doing is easy :-)

Any tips, or hints to make it easier?


I don't 'go collecting' hips, we have a wild rose in the garden and I use
its fruit. I'm torn between seeing the jewelled, arching branches through
the winter and possibly depriving birds (although there are a lot of other
berries around) and being self indulgent. This year I'll have the visual
delight because I have enough syrup and jelly left from last year and had
toe surgery last week which means I can't stand for long.

I use a huge pan and don't cut the fruit before it goes in. When it's soft I
put it in the blender then strain it roughly in a sieve and afterwards in a
very fine nylon (honey straining!) bag - overnight.

Woman's Hour said the hips are better after a frost, but I went ahead
anyway.


They're not as pretty after a frost and it's easy to think they've been
spoilt and discard them.

Apparently in Scandinavia "they" swear by it for their joints.


They lie! My joints aren't helped :-(

The price of the magic substance, litozin, makes the work worth while!


I use them because I can't bear waste and because I love the product. Jelly
is best but I often bottle some as syrup to use (diluted with cold water and
ice) as a summer drink. It's also good diluted with hot water for a warm
winter drink.

Mary
Pam in Bristol



Ah, all this reminds me as a child during the war we all went out
collecting rose hips for the war effort to be turned in rose hip by a
government body.
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Old 31-10-2006, 01:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Broadback" wrote in message
...



Ah, all this reminds me as a child during the war we all went out
collecting rose hips for the war effort to be turned in rose hip by a
government body.


Yes, so that children could be given sufficient vitamin C without importing
oranges. It was an excellent scheme.

Mary


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Old 31-10-2006, 02:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


"Jennifer Sparkes" wrote in a message:

When we used to make Rosehip Wine - many years ago - before
boiling them up we put them in the freezer. IIRC it did help.

---
I too have made quite a few gallons of rose hip wine using fresh and dried
hips. When making wine with fresh hips, I always used Rohament 'P', an
enzyme that breaks down the cellular structure in fruit, as does placing the
hips in a freezer for a few days. Rohament 'P', readily available from most
good home wine shops, also helps to retain the colour of the hips and
ensures excellent flavour and juice extraction.

MikeCT





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Old 31-10-2006, 08:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 17:27:00 +0100, Martin wrote:

Ah, all this reminds me as a child during the war we all went out
collecting rose hips for the war effort to be turned in rose hip by a
government body.


Yes, so that children could be given sufficient vitamin C without importing
oranges. It was an excellent scheme.


Boiling fruit destroys vitamin C.


Yes, I remember going out picking rosehips to take to school for the
government scheme. Were we paid anything? Can't remember.

As for boiling destroying the vitamin C, I did wonder about that, as I
had to boil for so long to get them soft, yet what other way is ther
of oproducing syrup?

Does the use of the Rohament 'P' help to preserve the Vitamin C?

Some very interesting and useful responses to my query; thanks.

Pam in Bristol
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Old 31-10-2006, 09:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 17:27:00 +0100, Martin wrote:

Ah, all this reminds me as a child during the war we all went out
collecting rose hips for the war effort to be turned in rose hip by a
government body.

Yes, so that children could be given sufficient vitamin C without
importing
oranges. It was an excellent scheme.


Boiling fruit destroys vitamin C.


No, keeping warm for a long time does. If boiling destroyed it anyone who
doesn't eat raw fruit and veg would be deprived!


Mary




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Old 02-11-2006, 01:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 13:52:24 GMT, "MikeCT" wrote:

I too have made quite a few gallons of rose hip wine using fresh and dried
hips. When making wine with fresh hips, I always used Rohament 'P', an
enzyme that breaks down the cellular structure in fruit, as does placing the
hips in a freezer for a few days. Rohament 'P', readily available from most
good home wine shops, also helps to retain the colour of the hips and
ensures excellent flavour and juice extraction.


I asked in my local wine shop and the nearest they had to the above
product was named something like ROHA-PECT something. It said it is
an enzyme. Is that the same sort of thing?

Pam in Bristol
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Old 03-11-2006, 08:34 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam

Pam Moore wrote:
Following an article in Saga magazine and an item on Woman's Hour, I
went collecting rose hips.
What a business. I had to cook them for ages to get them soft and
kept addiing more water. Then straining off all the pips and hairs
was a real pain. A lot of washing up later I have 3 jars of jam/jelly,
and as much again of the puree to freeze to cook another day.
Has anyone else tried it?
Any tips, or hints to make it easier?
Woman's Hour said the hips are better after a frost, but I went ahead
anyway.
Apparently in Scandinavia "they" swear by it for their joints.


Wouldn't it make them soggy and difficult to light? ;-)
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Old 04-11-2006, 08:58 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rose hip jam


Pam Moore wrote:
On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 13:52:24 GMT, "MikeCT" wrote:

I too have made quite a few gallons of rose hip wine using fresh and dried
hips. When making wine with fresh hips, I always used Rohament 'P', an
enzyme that breaks down the cellular structure in fruit, as does placing the
hips in a freezer for a few days. Rohament 'P', readily available from most
good home wine shops, also helps to retain the colour of the hips and
ensures excellent flavour and juice extraction.


I asked in my local wine shop and the nearest they had to the above
product was named something like ROHA-PECT something. It said it is
an enzyme. Is that the same sort of thing?


Yes, same-same. There are various trade-names for pectolytic enzymes.
Just follow the instructions, but paying particular attention to
temperature -- enzymes are of course stopped by high temps. The effect
is different from simply freezing.

A few of us had a discussion here a few months ago: some of us (e.g.
me) swear by pectolytics, while others don't bother, and get good
results. These enzymes are naturally present in greater or lesser
quantities in fruit, but I don't know how much in which fruit.

--
Mike.



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