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Old 08-01-2007, 12:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

Sacha wrote:
: On 8/1/07 02:21, in article
: owner of the manure heap. I think the horse's alimentary canal does
: a good job of preparing the manure for use by the gardener.

So is that alimentary my dear Sacha!?



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Old 08-01-2007, 01:19 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure


It's more important to rot down cow and chicken manure, AIUI but I think the
point of leaving horse manure in a heap is to allow weed seeds to be washed
out by the rain or to be taken out by the proud owner of the manure heap. I
think the horse's alimentary canal does a good job of preparing the manure
for use by the gardener.


I am not proud of my muck heap I wish some one would take it away. In
the old days we were allowed to burn them but not any more, pity that,
it smells rather nice :-)

kate
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Old 08-01-2007, 07:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

Farm1 writes

The only warning about horse manure is that there is some suggestiont
hat the vermicides that are givent o cope tih worms int he horses gut
could kill garden worms.


The worms in a horse's gut are not related to earthworms, though I
suppose a broad-spectrum vermicide could affect a wide range of
creatures.

--
Kay
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Old 08-01-2007, 10:19 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

"Kate Morgan" wrote in message

I get an attack of the irritations every time I see advice about

the
'need' to rot horse manure..I always wonder about whether the

person
giving the advice has ever experiemented or is just parroting book
learning.

It doesn't need rotting at all, ever. It may need some judicious
thought about placement but it can go on some spot or other in the
garden straight from the end of the horse's alimentary canal. I

know
because I've used it that fresh and never found any detrimental
effect. It may not look pretty and the well rotted stuff does

look
prettier but with mulch on top, who cares or will even notice?


I have a small muck heap near the stables and a big one in the

corner of
the paddock but at this time of year when the ground is wet I have
chucked it straight onto the garden or any available bit of ground,

it
has never caused any problems I just dont usually admit to doing it

:-)

Atta girl! Now stop that coyness and start singing the praises of
pure horse poop loud and long. For too long pure horse poop has had a
bad reputation and you and I both know that such a reputation is
totally undeserved, it's time we true believers educated the benighted
:-))))




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Old 08-01-2007, 10:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

"Sacha" wrote in message
"Farm1" [email protected] wrote:
"Sacha" wrote in message

I used to have a book called The Untidy Gardener and the author

describes
asking someone to clean out the stables, saying she would be able

to
use the
manure on her flower beds. Next thing she knew, he'd chucked it

straight
onto the beds from the stables and she was convinced all her

plants
would be
damaged. She describes seeing them 'waving helplessly' from

above
great
mounds of steaming manure. However, they survived, the winter

and
the worms
did their work and all was well, though it's not a recommended

practice,
admittedly. And NB, these were flower beds, not veg beds.


I hope that the point of the story was that the author had learned

how
to be a good gardener from that experience and that this lesson

was
why she turned into an untidy gardener.


I think she was an untidy gardener to start with!


A woman afte my own heart. Bless her.

And IIRC, her name is
Elizabeth Craigie but I'm stretching my memory back a long way.


Is ti worth trying to track down do you reall?

I get an attack of the irritations every time I see advice about

the
'need' to rot horse manure..I always wonder about whether the

person
giving the advice has ever experiemented or is just parroting book
learning.

It doesn't need rotting at all, ever. It may need some judicious
thought about placement but it can go on some spot or other in the
garden straight from the end of the horse's alimentary canal. I

know
because I've used it that fresh and never found any detrimental
effect. It may not look pretty and the well rotted stuff does

look
prettier but with mulch on top, who cares or will even notice?

It's more important to rot down cow and chicken manure, AIUI but I

think the
point of leaving horse manure in a heap is to allow weed seeds to be

washed
out by the rain or to be taken out by the proud owner of the manure

heap. I
think the horse's alimentary canal does a good job of preparing the

manure
for use by the gardener.


I think that heaping it is a total waste of time - too much risk of
losing nutrients. As a bulk user of horse poop, I find that I get
more weeds that are windblown than I do from the poop. And the thing
about horse poop is that it is such a good soil amendment material,
that any weeds that do manage to get through are so easily puilled out
that they aren't even a minor problem.


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Old 08-01-2007, 10:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

"Kate Morgan" wrote in message
It's more important to rot down cow and chicken manure, AIUI but I

think the
point of leaving horse manure in a heap is to allow weed seeds to

be washed
out by the rain or to be taken out by the proud owner of the

manure heap. I
think the horse's alimentary canal does a good job of preparing

the manure
for use by the gardener.


I am not proud of my muck heap I wish some one would take it away.

In
the old days we were allowed to burn them but not any more, pity

that,
it smells rather nice :-)


Can you put a notice up anywhere so that you can get a keen gardener/s
to take it? I do a swap with aneighbour, I keep her in eggs and she
keeps me in horse poo and we both think we are getting the best part
of the bargain.


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Old 08-01-2007, 10:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

"K" wrote in message
Farm1 writes

The only warning about horse manure is that there is some

suggestiont
hat the vermicides that are givent o cope tih worms int he horses

gut
could kill garden worms.


The worms in a horse's gut are not related to earthworms, though I
suppose a broad-spectrum vermicide could affect a wide range of
creatures.


When we still had horses, the vermicide we gave them was a broad
spectrum one. I dont' know if it would kill soil worms or not and
have only noticed that I get more worms after using the manure.
However, I have consistently read this as being a warning about using
fresh horse manure (especially sourced from racing stables) but I have
certainly wondered if it's just an old gardener's tale.

I have so often read of the 'need' to pile horse manure but I know
from experience that such isn't the case. I do lots of other thing in
my garden too that would be frowned on by garden purists but they work
so I often wonder about how we end up doing the things that we do.
For example, I've often planted into weed piles and that grows a crop
and I now plant all potatoes in a hay bed and that works too.


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Old 09-01-2007, 08:29 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 02:44:30 +0000, Jack wrote
(in article ):

A silly question from a person born and raised in a city and only ever
having veggies from a supermarket, nicely washed and packaged !

Adding horse manure to soil for growing veggies - could you get the
screaming abdabs from the manure, some deadly disease or nasties of some
kind? I see some fellow allotment holders adding fairly fresh manure to
their soil, and I wonder how healthy it is to eat veggies grown in it?

Thanks.




When I was a small lad, and evacuated to Cardiff during the war, I lived with
my grand-mother. In those days there were many, many horses on the roads,
pulling tradesman's carts mainly. Every time a cart went past, grannie
would shoot out onto the street with a bucket and spade kept for that purpose
and collect the horse manure deposited on the road by the passing horse. The
manure then went straight onto her rhubarb and vegetables. And by god, I
remember her rhubarb tart to this day. It didn't do me any harm, and it was
normal practice in the street where she lived. In fact it used to be quite a
competition to see who could get out there first. Happy days.

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Old 09-01-2007, 09:15 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

"Peter James" wrote in message
s.com...
On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 02:44:30 +0000, Jack wrote


When I was a small lad, and evacuated to Cardiff during the war, I lived
with
my grand-mother. In those days there were many, many horses on the roads,
pulling tradesman's carts mainly. Every time a cart went past, grannie
would shoot out onto the street with a bucket and spade kept for that
purpose
and collect the horse manure deposited on the road by the passing horse.
The
manure then went straight onto her rhubarb and vegetables. And by god, I
remember her rhubarb tart to this day. It didn't do me any harm, and it
was
normal practice in the street where she lived. In fact it used to be
quite a
competition to see who could get out there first. Happy days.


:-))

Ah happy Days!!

I was in Kingston on Thames and then in Beer in South Devon. Happened in
both those places as well :-))

Country wide practice I would think.

Mike


--
.................................................. .........
Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association
www.rnshipmates.co.uk
www.nsrafa.com




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Old 09-01-2007, 12:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

On 9/1/07 08:29, in article
, "Peter James"
wrote:

On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 02:44:30 +0000, Jack wrote
(in article ):

A silly question from a person born and raised in a city and only ever
having veggies from a supermarket, nicely washed and packaged !

Adding horse manure to soil for growing veggies - could you get the
screaming abdabs from the manure, some deadly disease or nasties of some
kind? I see some fellow allotment holders adding fairly fresh manure to
their soil, and I wonder how healthy it is to eat veggies grown in it?

Thanks.




When I was a small lad, and evacuated to Cardiff during the war, I lived with
my grand-mother. In those days there were many, many horses on the roads,
pulling tradesman's carts mainly. Every time a cart went past, grannie
would shoot out onto the street with a bucket and spade kept for that purpose
and collect the horse manure deposited on the road by the passing horse. The
manure then went straight onto her rhubarb and vegetables. And by god, I
remember her rhubarb tart to this day. It didn't do me any harm, and it was
normal practice in the street where she lived. In fact it used to be quite a
competition to see who could get out there first. Happy days.

That definitely used to happen then but equally, I doubt horses were given
whatever medical treatments they get nowadays, which means the concerns of
the OP are still relevant. My grandfather had wonderful roses!

--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
http://www.discoverdartmoor.co.uk/

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Old 09-01-2007, 04:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure


"Kate Morgan" wrote in message
...
and if you are organic make
sure that the horse owners are not giving the horses medication, I
think
that we have discussed this topic before and I am still not sure
how
long it takes the drugs to become safe.

I'd be more concerned but not very much concerned about possible
hormone weedkillers on the straw. Without doing any research I would
guess that the horses wouldn't be excreting any significant amounts of
medicines. If most of the medcine wasn't metabolised that would be a
wasted vet's bill wouldn't it?


yes you are probably right, my little mare is on hormone drugs but she
is quite small.I do however still warn anyone who wants the manure and
it is up to them. Not many people do want it tho, they are happy if I
bag it up and deliver but I am tired of that game and don't do it any
more. It just rots down in the corner of the field, one day I might
plant that corner up and it should be amazing :-)


I'm quite happy to collect it from our local stables, well, about 4 miles
away.

It comes free and is a godsend.

Alan


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Old 09-01-2007, 04:40 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure


Can you put a notice up anywhere so that you can get a keen gardener/s
to take it? I do a swap with aneighbour, I keep her in eggs and she
keeps me in horse poo and we both think we are getting the best part
of the bargain.


No, there are lots of neddies around here and most of us have heaps in
the corner of fields, the gardeners dont seem to want it so I will
continue to chuck it on the garden, if it ever stops raining that is :-)

kate
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Old 10-01-2007, 04:46 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure


"'Mike'" wrote in message
...
"Peter James" wrote in message
s.com...
On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 02:44:30 +0000, Jack wrote


When I was a small lad, and evacuated to Cardiff during the war, I lived
with
my grand-mother. In those days there were many, many horses on the

roads,
pulling tradesman's carts mainly. Every time a cart went past, grannie
would shoot out onto the street with a bucket and spade kept for that
purpose
and collect the horse manure deposited on the road by the passing horse.
The
manure then went straight onto her rhubarb and vegetables. And by god,

I
remember her rhubarb tart to this day. It didn't do me any harm, and

it
was
normal practice in the street where she lived. In fact it used to be
quite a
competition to see who could get out there first. Happy days.


:-))

Ah happy Days!!

I was in Kingston on Thames and then in Beer in South Devon.


sounds like a good place to be, in beer.

rob


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Old 10-01-2007, 11:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Horse Manure

We have a riding school up the road and they take troops of visitors out on
horses along the coast all the time.

I always go out and shovel it up for my compost ... and get quite annoyed
when it's in the road and someone drives over it first!

Keith


"Sacha" wrote in message
...
On 9/1/07 08:29, in article
, "Peter James"
wrote:

On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 02:44:30 +0000, Jack wrote
(in article ):

A silly question from a person born and raised in a city and only ever
having veggies from a supermarket, nicely washed and packaged !

Adding horse manure to soil for growing veggies - could you get the
screaming abdabs from the manure, some deadly disease or nasties of some
kind? I see some fellow allotment holders adding fairly fresh manure to
their soil, and I wonder how healthy it is to eat veggies grown in it?

Thanks.




When I was a small lad, and evacuated to Cardiff during the war, I lived
with
my grand-mother. In those days there were many, many horses on the
roads,
pulling tradesman's carts mainly. Every time a cart went past, grannie
would shoot out onto the street with a bucket and spade kept for that
purpose
and collect the horse manure deposited on the road by the passing horse.
The
manure then went straight onto her rhubarb and vegetables. And by god, I
remember her rhubarb tart to this day. It didn't do me any harm, and it
was
normal practice in the street where she lived. In fact it used to be
quite a
competition to see who could get out there first. Happy days.

That definitely used to happen then but equally, I doubt horses were given
whatever medical treatments they get nowadays, which means the concerns of
the OP are still relevant. My grandfather had wonderful roses!

--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
http://www.discoverdartmoor.co.uk/





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