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Old 30-03-2007, 03:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?

Thanks.




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Old 30-03-2007, 03:58 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

On 30 Mar, 15:24, "Melanie" wrote:
This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?


)) Yeah. Or your neighbours or friends. Even in town you can find
twigs - what about your local park, on the side of the streets/roads?
I use the twigs to deter birds and cats but the support is from a net,
or wigwam (or I let them climb on other bushes like a musk mallow and
on the other side on an overgrown hebe). Are these sweet peas of peas?

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Old 30-03-2007, 04:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

"La Puce" wrote
"Melanie" wrote:
The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". ?


Are these sweet peas of peas?

Hi, peas for eating - Kelvedon Wonder and Early Onward. Lots of trees
around my area, but none of them mine.



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Old 30-03-2007, 04:20 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

On 30 Mar, 16:06, "Melanie" wrote:
Hi, peas for eating - Kelvedon Wonder and Early Onward. Lots of trees
around my area, but none of them mine.


Ask to look under the trees - knock on doors!!! Send leaflets
around ... ))

But seriously, are you going to straight sow? Or start in pots? Or
they are already sowed? Are you going to use a net or poles? You know
I don't always use twigs, only if I grow at home (cats are a problem).
I have a scarecrow at the lotty, and I use paper bags on sticks to
scare the birds, and the net is sufficient for the tendrils to hook
onto it. It's were I put little twigs if I find they hang the wrong
way etc.

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Old 30-03-2007, 05:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

La Puce wrote:
On 30 Mar, 16:06, "Melanie" wrote:
Hi, peas for eating - Kelvedon Wonder and Early Onward. Lots of trees
around my area, but none of them mine.


Ask to look under the trees - knock on doors!!! Send leaflets
around ... ))

But seriously, are you going to straight sow? Or start in pots? Or
they are already sowed? Are you going to use a net or poles? You know
I don't always use twigs, only if I grow at home (cats are a problem).
I have a scarecrow at the lotty, and I use paper bags on sticks to
scare the birds, and the net is sufficient for the tendrils to hook
onto it. It's were I put little twigs if I find they hang the wrong
way etc.

I have always used and preferred pea sticks. However I can no longer
source them. Last year I used pea netting, (available garden centres,
DIY sheds and Wilkinsons) but I found it necessary to support the
netting well by a stout pole at either end then wire or cord between
them. I found that very satisfactory, I planted the row 3 peas "wide" I
used the net over the peas whilst they germinated to keep the birds off,
then erected the netting down the centre of the row.


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Old 30-03-2007, 08:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

Melanie writes
This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?

Use straight sticks and string.
--
Kay
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Old 30-03-2007, 11:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks


"Melanie" wrote
This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?

Our old allotment was surrounded with a hedge that we cut pea stick from but
the new one hasn't. So we now use wire netting and make a fence with stakes
holding the netting up. Works very well and is reusable year after year. You
may be lucky and find someone getting rid of some wire netting, it's how we
gained some lovely 4ft wide plastic coated stuff, enough for two rows.
That said, rabbit fencing would work OK and that's not expensive.
We no longer bother with the tall growing peas after a number of years of
failure with them.

--
Regards
Bob H
17mls W. of London.UK


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Old 03-04-2007, 01:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks


"Melanie" wrote in a message:
This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?

---
Hi Melanie,
There are still a few discarded small, 'real' Christmas trees in my home
area, just the job for supporting pea plants. I can imagine a line of
Christmas trees in the veg garden covered in pea plants, at least it would
give the poor things a second innings. Search around and you too might find
a few just waiting to be re-used.

MikeCT



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Old 03-04-2007, 04:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Twiggy Pea Sticks

On 3/4/07 13:48, in article ,
"MikeCT" wrote:


"Melanie" wrote in a message:
This is probably a daft question, but ... The advice is to support peas
with "twiggy pea sticks". I have no trees and no suitable shrubs in my
garden to cut any "twiggy pea sticks". Are these things available (cheap)
in the garden centres, or do I have to roam the countryside armed with
secateurs, dodging the twiggy pea stick police and irate landowners?

---
Hi Melanie,
There are still a few discarded small, 'real' Christmas trees in my home
area, just the job for supporting pea plants. I can imagine a line of
Christmas trees in the veg garden covered in pea plants, at least it would
give the poor things a second innings. Search around and you too might find
a few just waiting to be re-used.


Last year, we'd just trimmed a hazel hedge at the side of the nursery. I
rescued some pea sticks from the bonfire heap and when a customer wanted
some, told her to help herself. Melanie could look out for neighbours
cutting back hedges and nurseries doing the same. Failing that you can find
stems of the contorted willow in florists' shops (known as wiggly Arthur to
this family!) but they tend to be pretty expensive.
--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
http://www.discoverdartmoor.co.uk/
(remove weeds from address)



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