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Old 29-04-2007, 08:26 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?

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Old 29-04-2007, 08:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells


"Sacha" wrote in message
. uk...
This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?

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That is http://www.gardenbanter.co.uk which Hubbard is advertising. Well
worth a look and full of lots of interesting information from lots of
sights.

Go and take a peek over the fence.

Mike

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Old 29-04-2007, 08:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

From http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/gqt/fshe...heetsq6.shtml:






Question from Pauline Alsop: Why did one of my bluebells turn pink
this year? I transplanted them 3 years ago and they've always been blue.

Bunny: There's a general consensus of opinion that if you plant them
upside down they will change colour. Maybe a squirrel dug it up, turned it
upside down, and pushed it back in the wrong way!

Anne: In natural populations you do get the odd pink or white
bluebell, and I think this one of yours has always been pink, it's just that
it happened to flower this year. It may have arisen from seed, or
vegetatively by bulbill. I don't think it has changed colour, it is just a
natural thing that bluebells will do.

Pippa: Earlier this year in the woods near my home there was a
definite sudden incidence of white bluebells. I've known those woods quite
well now for six years and I've not seen a single white one before, and I'm
sure it's just a case of seedlings arising. They can be pollinated by all
sorts of other bluebells from other areas, and as Anne says, there is a
tendency for them to do that sometimes and I think pink is just another
variation.



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"Sacha" wrote in message
. uk...
This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?

Garden Banter does not have permission to use my posts.
Join uk.rec.gardening instead.
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http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
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Old 29-04-2007, 12:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

Sacha wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


It could be some sort of genetic mutation. Sometimes a plant with pink
flowers can produce a couple of white ones.


Greg

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Old 29-04-2007, 02:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

On 29/4/07 12:15, in article ,
"Gregoire Kretz" wrote:

Sacha wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


It could be some sort of genetic mutation. Sometimes a plant with pink
flowers can produce a couple of white ones.

I suppose it must be something like that, or something has blown in from
elsewhere. It's a bit like some of the wild primroses we see here and
there. Some are a true pink or even deeper while all around are the usual
yellow.


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Old 29-04-2007, 02:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 08:26:07 +0100, Sacha
wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I don't know how it happens but mine do the same, sometimes more pink
ones, sometimes less. Sadly it's only the Spanish oned that do this!

Pam in Bristol
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Old 29-04-2007, 04:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

On 29/4/07 14:54, in article ,
"Pam Moore" wrote:

On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 08:26:07 +0100, Sacha
wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I don't know how it happens but mine do the same, sometimes more pink
ones, sometimes less. Sadly it's only the Spanish oned that do this!

Pam in Bristol


Out they come then!

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http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
(remove weeds from address)
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Old 29-04-2007, 04:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

--

"Sacha" wrote in message
. uk...
On 29/4/07 14:54, in article ,
"Pam Moore" wrote:

On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 08:26:07 +0100, Sacha
wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I don't know how it happens but mine do the same, sometimes more pink
ones, sometimes less. Sadly it's only the Spanish oned that do this!

Pam in Bristol


Out they come then!

--
Sacha
(remove weeds from address)

Garden Banter does not have permission to use my posts.
Join uk.rec.gardening instead.




That is
http://www.gardenbanter.co.uk which Hubbard is advertising. Well
worth a look and full of lots of interesting information from lots of
sights.



Go and take a peek over the fence.



Mike





--
.................................................. ..............
The Royal Naval Electrical Branch Association.
'THE' Association if you served in the Electrical Branch of the Royal Navy
www.rneba.org.uk




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Old 29-04-2007, 05:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

In message , Sacha
writes
This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I'd guess that this is a seedling which is displaying a recessive trait.

Flower colour depends on several factors, among which are the nature and
concentration of the pigments involved, and the concentration of
Hydrogen (acidity) and other ions in the environment in which they are
stored.

For example, Hydrangea is well known for the flower colour varying with
soil chemistry. Presumably Hydrangea doesn't maintain its pigments in a
controlled chemical environment. Similarly a bluebell could have a
broken enzyme, leading to the chemical environment in which its pigments
are held not being controlled, and therefore a change in colour.

Alternatively, pigments are produced, one from another, in a chain of
reactions, catalysed by various enzymes. If one of the enzymes is broken
the end result of the change of reactions is a different pigment, with a
consequent change in flower colour.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 30-04-2007, 08:26 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

On 29/4/07 17:31, in article lid, "Stewart Robert
Hinsley" wrote:

In message , Sacha
writes
This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I'd guess that this is a seedling which is displaying a recessive trait.

Flower colour depends on several factors, among which are the nature and
concentration of the pigments involved, and the concentration of
Hydrogen (acidity) and other ions in the environment in which they are
stored.

For example, Hydrangea is well known for the flower colour varying with
soil chemistry. Presumably Hydrangea doesn't maintain its pigments in a
controlled chemical environment. Similarly a bluebell could have a
broken enzyme, leading to the chemical environment in which its pigments
are held not being controlled, and therefore a change in colour.

Alternatively, pigments are produced, one from another, in a chain of
reactions, catalysed by various enzymes. If one of the enzymes is broken
the end result of the change of reactions is a different pigment, with a
consequent change in flower colour.


Both interesting and erudite, thank you Stewart! Do you think our pink
bluebells are more likely to be the Spanish ones. I haven't had time to do
a close inspection yet but I'll get out there today.
We were driving home across Dartmoor on Saturday and had the great pleasure
of seeing huge masses of English bluebells in the hedgerows, along with
campion and stitchwort. It was the most beautiful sight.


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(remove weeds from address)
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Join uk.rec.gardening instead.


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Old 30-04-2007, 09:00 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

In message , Sacha
writes
On 29/4/07 17:31, in article lid, "Stewart Robert
Hinsley" wrote:

In message , Sacha
writes
This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


I'd guess that this is a seedling which is displaying a recessive trait.

Flower colour depends on several factors, among which are the nature and
concentration of the pigments involved, and the concentration of
Hydrogen (acidity) and other ions in the environment in which they are
stored.

For example, Hydrangea is well known for the flower colour varying with
soil chemistry. Presumably Hydrangea doesn't maintain its pigments in a
controlled chemical environment. Similarly a bluebell could have a
broken enzyme, leading to the chemical environment in which its pigments
are held not being controlled, and therefore a change in colour.

Alternatively, pigments are produced, one from another, in a chain of
reactions, catalysed by various enzymes. If one of the enzymes is broken
the end result of the change of reactions is a different pigment, with a
consequent change in flower colour.


Both interesting and erudite, thank you Stewart! Do you think our pink
bluebells are more likely to be the Spanish ones. I haven't had time to do
a close inspection yet but I'll get out there today.
We were driving home across Dartmoor on Saturday and had the great pleasure
of seeing huge masses of English bluebells in the hedgerows, along with
campion and stitchwort. It was the most beautiful sight.


I am under the impression that the white and pink variants occur in
parallel in both Common and Spanish Bluebells. There are a number of
other characters that distinguish the two species -
URL:http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&q=English+Spanish+bluebell
will find you text on that subject, but that will not necessarily apply
to all hybrids - if you've got some introgression into a population of
Common Bluebells all you can do is rogue obvious hybrids as they occur.

I expect that pink and white variants occur more frequently in
populations grown from cultivated stock, rather than from wild stock, as
variants have been selected for horticultural use in the past.
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 30-04-2007, 03:21 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
[...]
I am under the impression that the white and pink variants occur in
parallel in both Common and Spanish Bluebells. There are a number of
other characters that distinguish the two species -

URL:http://www.google.com/search?num=100...Spanish+bluebe
ll
will find you text on that subject, but that will not necessarily
apply to all hybrids - if you've got some introgression into a
population of Common Bluebells all you can do is rogue obvious
hybrids as they occur.

I expect that pink and white variants occur more frequently in
populations grown from cultivated stock, rather than from wild stock,
as variants have been selected for horticultural use in the past.


There's an interesting and attractive variant naturalised at the Gelli
Aur country park near Carmarthen. This is white, with a narrow streak of
deep pink down the middle of each "petal". As far as I remember, last
time I was there the large colony still hadn't been visibly
cross-pollinated with ordinary blue ones. I imagine the group must have
been planted in Victorian times when the arboretum was set up, so this
represents a remarkable survival. I mentioned it to a senior member of
staff, hoping that they might take steps to have the population bulked
up for sale or preservation, but I don't think they did anything about
it.

--
Mike.



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Old 30-04-2007, 09:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pink bluebells

Stewart Robert Hinsley writes

I am under the impression that the white and pink variants occur in
parallel in both Common and Spanish Bluebells. There are a number of
other characters that distinguish the two species -
URL:http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&q=English+Spanish+bluebell
will find you text on that subject, but that will not necessarily apply
to all hybrids - if you've got some introgression into a population of
Common Bluebells all you can do is rogue obvious hybrids as they occur.

I expect that pink and white variants occur more frequently in
populations grown from cultivated stock, rather than from wild stock,
as variants have been selected for horticultural use in the past.


I'm pretty sure that you get pink variants of english bluebells (and I
can remember seeing the occasional one back in the 50s in wild bluebell
populations when spanish bluebells were far less common in this
country), but I think that pink and white variants are far more common
amongst the Spanish bluebells. Whether this is true in the wild
population or whether it is, as you suggest, a result of cultivation and
selection, I don't know.

Plantlife has more information on its page, including an identification
chart and the report of their recent survey of bluebell populations -
worth a read, but only if you are on broadband - it has a lot of large
pictures!

http://www.plantlife.org.uk/
--
Kay
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Default Pink bluebells

In article , Gregoire
Kretz writes
Sacha wrote:

This year we have one clump of pink bluebells when we have never had any
before, anywhere. Does anyone know how this happens?


It could be some sort of genetic mutation. Sometimes a plant with pink
flowers can produce a couple of white ones.


Greg



I have them also and there are a few in the wild in a local woodland.
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http://www.lancedal.demon.co.uk


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