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Old 16-03-2008, 01:14 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated

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Old 16-03-2008, 03:10 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 12:14:26 GMT, Stuart Noble
wrote:

Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated



You could ask your local council who recycles their green waste -
sometimes they sell it back to residents at a discount.
--
http://www.freedeliveryuk.co.uk
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Old 16-03-2008, 04:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 14:10:36 +0000, mogga
wrote:

On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 12:14:26 GMT, Stuart Noble
wrote:

Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated



You could ask your local council who recycles their green waste -
sometimes they sell it back to residents at a discount.



I have wondered about this? How do you know that someone has not
recycled their foliage after applying weed-killer?

I am not sure I would risk it.


--

judith.

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Old 16-03-2008, 05:30 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

wrote:
On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 14:10:36 +0000, mogga
wrote:

On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 12:14:26 GMT, Stuart Noble
wrote:

Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


You could ask your local council who recycles their green waste -
sometimes they sell it back to residents at a discount.



I have wondered about this? How do you know that someone has not
recycled their foliage after applying weed-killer?

I am not sure I would risk it.



I'm not sure I trust my local council either :-)

In the end, is there any difference between multi purpose compost from
B&Q with periodic doses of feed from a packet and the traditional
compost/manure routine?
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Old 16-03-2008, 05:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On Mar 16, 12:14 pm, Stuart Noble
wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


I was going to arrange for the local stables to drop off a trailer
load of manure, now I'm not so sure as when the horses are treated
with anti-biotics or worming medicine, this too is composted. I would
put it on a flower bed but don't think I would want it on the veggies,
unless someone knows more than me, perhaps the heat kills anything
dangerous?

Judith


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Old 16-03-2008, 09:49 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Location: South Wales
Posts: 2,409
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On 16 Mar, 16:39, Judith in France
wrote:
On Mar 16, 12:14 pm, Stuart Noble
wrote:

Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


I was going to arrange for the local stables to drop off a trailer
load of manure, now I'm not so sure as when the horses are treated
with anti-biotics or worming medicine, this too is composted. *I would
put it on a flower bed but don't think I would want it on the veggies,
unless someone knows more than me, perhaps the heat kills anything
dangerous?

Judith


I wouldn't wory, if you think of the ammount of antibiotic used for
one horse, the bulk will be absorbed into the body, then what passes
through is then diluted into a full load of manure it will be so
diluted there is no way it could harm you.
Much mor risk from eating chickens that have had a dose of Anti
biotic.
Winter stable manure should be free from wormer residue, if in doubt
ask them
David Hill
Abacus Nurseries
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Old 16-03-2008, 10:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On Mar 16, 8:49 pm, Dave Hill wrote:
On 16 Mar, 16:39, Judith in France
wrote:



On Mar 16, 12:14 pm, Stuart Noble
wrote:


Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start from
scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil and
replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I don't
care about the cost of materials but they need to be available from the
garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium but
for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy the
equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type liquid feed
would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


I was going to arrange for the local stables to drop off a trailer
load of manure, now I'm not so sure as when the horses are treated
with anti-biotics or worming medicine, this too is composted. I would
put it on a flower bed but don't think I would want it on the veggies,
unless someone knows more than me, perhaps the heat kills anything
dangerous?


Judith


I wouldn't wory, if you think of the ammount of antibiotic used for
one horse, the bulk will be absorbed into the body, then what passes
through is then diluted into a full load of manure it will be so
diluted there is no way it could harm you.
Much mor risk from eating chickens that have had a dose of Anti
biotic.
Winter stable manure should be free from wormer residue, if in doubt
ask them
David Hill
Abacus Nurseries


Thank you David, that puts my mind at rest.

Judith
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Old 17-03-2008, 10:22 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 193
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil
and replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I
don't care about the cost of materials but they need to be available
from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium
but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy
the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type
liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to buy sharp
sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice as much decent
compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil with that?

If you don't have enough composted material in your soil, you'll be forever
watering if we have a dry summer.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


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Old 17-03-2008, 11:03 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 109
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On 17 Mar, 09:22, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil
and replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I
don't care about the cost of materials but they need to be available
from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium
but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy
the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type
liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to buy sharp
sand to make up your growing medium. *Why not get twice as much decent
compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil with that?

If you don't have enough composted material in your soil, you'll be forever
watering if we have a dry summer.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


Maybe I have the wrong impression of the conditions in your garden..
but sandy/stony soil sounds the perfect growing medium for lots of
annuals - most don't need a rich soil. I'd just keep adding plenty of
organic matter to the existing soil.
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Old 17-03-2008, 11:14 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Ornata wrote:
On 17 Mar, 09:22, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil
and replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I
don't care about the cost of materials but they need to be available
from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium
but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy
the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type
liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated

As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to buy sharp
sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice as much decent
compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil with that?

If you don't have enough composted material in your soil, you'll be forever
watering if we have a dry summer.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


Maybe I have the wrong impression of the conditions in your garden..
but sandy/stony soil sounds the perfect growing medium for lots of
annuals - most don't need a rich soil. I'd just keep adding plenty of
organic matter to the existing soil.


As I explained, for practical reasons I am limited to what I can buy
from a garden centre, so what do I buy that will do the same as "adding
organic matter"?


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Old 17-03-2008, 11:17 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 84
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Jeff Layman wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil
and replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I
don't care about the cost of materials but they need to be available
from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium
but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy
the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type
liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated


As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to buy sharp
sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice as much decent
compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil with that?

If you don't have enough composted material in your soil, you'll be forever
watering if we have a dry summer.


Well I can add B&Q compost to retain water, but what about nutrients?
What does general purpose compost actually consist of anyway?
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Old 17-03-2008, 11:25 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Stuart Noble wrote:
Ornata wrote:
On 17 Mar, 09:22, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing
soil and replacing it with something better. As this is a small
project, I don't care about the cost of materials but they need to
be available from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that
medium but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me,
can I buy the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a
Phostrogen type liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated
As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to
buy sharp sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice
as much decent compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil
with that? If you don't have enough composted material in your soil,
you'll be
forever watering if we have a dry summer.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


Maybe I have the wrong impression of the conditions in your garden..
but sandy/stony soil sounds the perfect growing medium for lots of
annuals - most don't need a rich soil. I'd just keep adding plenty
of organic matter to the existing soil.


As I explained, for practical reasons I am limited to what I can buy
from a garden centre, so what do I buy that will do the same as
"adding organic matter"?


Composted bark, other composted matter, John Innes 3. Any general purpose
compost.

Just because you want to grow annuals it doesn't mean that you have to go
with poor soil. If you use rich soil the annuals will still grow well, and
you won't have to add fertilisers for a year or two.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


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Old 17-03-2008, 12:25 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 84
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

Jeff Layman wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Ornata wrote:
On 17 Mar, 09:22, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing
soil and replacing it with something better. As this is a small
project, I don't care about the cost of materials but they need to
be available from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that
medium but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me,
can I buy the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a
Phostrogen type liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated
As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to
buy sharp sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice
as much decent compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil
with that? If you don't have enough composted material in your soil,
you'll be
forever watering if we have a dry summer.

--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)
Maybe I have the wrong impression of the conditions in your garden..
but sandy/stony soil sounds the perfect growing medium for lots of
annuals - most don't need a rich soil. I'd just keep adding plenty
of organic matter to the existing soil.

As I explained, for practical reasons I am limited to what I can buy
from a garden centre, so what do I buy that will do the same as
"adding organic matter"?


Composted bark, other composted matter, John Innes 3. Any general purpose
compost.


Thanks for replying
It looks as though the latter consists of:

7 Loam
3 Peat
2 Sand


to which

0.6kg ground limestone
3.6kg hoof and horn meal
3.6kg superphosphate
1.8kg potassium sulphate

is added per cubic metre

Just because you want to grow annuals it doesn't mean that you have to go
with poor soil. If you use rich soil the annuals will still grow well, and
you won't have to add fertilisers for a year or two.

It also says, "nutrients are typically sufficient for 1-2 months of
growing, after which time additional proprietary feed should be given".
Doesn't sound very long does it? I imagine "topsoil" and "loam" are
pretty much the same thing?

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Old 17-03-2008, 06:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On 17 Mar, 10:14, Stuart Noble
wrote:
Ornata wrote:
On 17 Mar, 09:22, "Jeff Layman" wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:
Having a small garden with sandy/stony soil, I've decided to start
from scratch on a couple of raised beds by ditching the existing soil
and replacing it with something better. As this is a small project, I
don't care about the cost of materials but they need to be available
from the garden centre in 25kg bags.
Am I right in thinking that general purpose compost and sharp sand
should form the bulk? Things seem to grow well enough in that medium
but for how long? As a compost bin isn't practical for me, can I buy
the equivalent as a commercial product? Maybe a Phostrogen type
liquid feed would be as good?
Any advice appreciated
As you have sandy/stony soil, I do not understand why you need to buy sharp
sand to make up your growing medium. Why not get twice as much decent
compost or manure, and mix your current garden soil with that?


If you don't have enough composted material in your soil, you'll be forever
watering if we have a dry summer.


--
Jeff
(cut "thetape" to reply)


Maybe I have the wrong impression of the conditions in your garden..
but sandy/stony soil sounds the perfect growing medium for lots of
annuals - most don't need a rich soil. I'd just keep adding plenty of
organic matter to the existing soil.


As I explained, for practical reasons I am limited to what I can buy
from a garden centre, so what do I buy that will do the same as "adding
organic matter"?


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Old 17-03-2008, 06:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,439
Default How to create the perfect soil for annual flowers

On 17/3/08 17:27, in article
,
"bobharvey" wrote:
snip

As I explained, for practical reasons I am limited to what I can buy
from a garden centre, so what do I buy that will do the same as "adding
organic matter"?



If it's available to you, straw or spent mushroom compost is good. Some
places might make a small charge for delivering.
--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
'We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our
children.'




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