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Old 20-04-2008, 01:05 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

Dear All,

I am in the process of erecting an 8 foot high concrete post and panel
wall between my house and the nearby road. Once it's complete, it will
need something to cover it completely as it's not particularly
attractive. I was originally thinking of covering it with closeboard
fencing, but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.

The wall runs approximately north to south, the east facing side is
towards the road, but is hidden from the road by a 14 foot high beech
hedge. The westward side faces the house, but the house shades it from
the sun. It does get a bit of sun each day, but is predominantly shady.
There is about 10 feet between the house and the wall, and the area is
brick paved. I intend to take about 1 sq. foot of the brick paving out
at the bottom centre of each fence bay (10 bays, each 6 foot wide) so
that I can root a plant into soil. The soil in the area is mainly clay,
although curiously, we seem to have a fairly decent loam in our garden.

So - what varieties of Ivy would fairly quickly cover the entire wall
and look good? Or is there a similar climber I should think about.
Ideally, I want something that is fully self supporting so I dont have
to string any support wires. I would like it to reach the 8 foot top of
the fence, but then would prune it from going any further otherwise it
would interfere with the top of the beech hedge.

Any ideas? Also, if I go with Ivy, once it is established, could I
plant a climbing Rose with each Ivy plant and let the Rose climb
through the Ivy?

All opinions gratefully recieved.

Thanks,


Alasdair


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Old 20-04-2008, 05:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Dear All,

I am in the process of erecting an 8 foot high concrete post and panel
wall between my house and the nearby road. Once it's complete, it will
need something to cover it completely as it's not particularly attractive.
I was originally thinking of covering it with closeboard fencing, but then
thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look a lot nicer.

The wall runs approximately north to south, the east facing side is
towards the road, but is hidden from the road by a 14 foot high beech
hedge. The westward side faces the house, but the house shades it from the
sun. It does get a bit of sun each day, but is predominantly shady. There
is about 10 feet between the house and the wall, and the area is brick
paved. I intend to take about 1 sq. foot of the brick paving out at the
bottom centre of each fence bay (10 bays, each 6 foot wide) so that I can
root a plant into soil. The soil in the area is mainly clay, although
curiously, we seem to have a fairly decent loam in our garden.

So - what varieties of Ivy would fairly quickly cover the entire wall and
look good? Or is there a similar climber I should think about. Ideally, I
want something that is fully self supporting so I dont have to string any
support wires. I would like it to reach the 8 foot top of the fence, but
then would prune it from going any further otherwise it would interfere
with the top of the beech hedge.

Any ideas? Also, if I go with Ivy, once it is established, could I plant a
climbing Rose with each Ivy plant and let the Rose climb through the Ivy?

All opinions gratefully recieved.

Thanks,


Alasdair


I've inherited loads of ivy from the previous owners, one plant up the back
of the house and the other covering an 8 ft fence. It is VERY aggressive,
and needs constant cutting back and controlling - so I personally don't
think integrating any other plant with it will work, and you'll need to keep
an eye on it to stop it spreading.

I'm not too keen on it, but it does coat boring stuff with green. I have to
keep it out of the window frames and stop it climing up the wall of the
house and into the central heating duct, all round the satellite dish etc.
etc. When it's wet and warm, you can almost see it grow!

Barb

Just my opinion.



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Old 20-04-2008, 05:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 12:05:04 +0100, adm wrote:


All opinions gratefully recieved.


My answer to your question is the same as the famous advice to the
young man considering marriage - Don't!

Seriously, you will find it good to start with because it will cover
the wall quickly, but it won't stop there and you will have a
never-ending job to prune it (on both sides because it will grow over
and through the wall). It will grow sideways as well unto anything at
the ends of the wall.

Now someone will come along and disagree, I'm sure!
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Old 20-04-2008, 09:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Dear All,

I am in the process of erecting an 8 foot high concrete post and panel
wall between my house and the nearby road. Once it's complete, it will
need something to cover it completely as it's not particularly attractive.
I was originally thinking of covering it with closeboard fencing, but then
thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look a lot nicer.

The wall runs approximately north to south, the east facing side is
towards the road, but is hidden from the road by a 14 foot high beech
hedge. The westward side faces the house, but the house shades it from the
sun. It does get a bit of sun each day, but is predominantly shady. There
is about 10 feet between the house and the wall, and the area is brick
paved. I intend to take about 1 sq. foot of the brick paving out at the
bottom centre of each fence bay (10 bays, each 6 foot wide) so that I can
root a plant into soil. The soil in the area is mainly clay, although
curiously, we seem to have a fairly decent loam in our garden.

So - what varieties of Ivy would fairly quickly cover the entire wall and
look good? Or is there a similar climber I should think about. Ideally, I
want something that is fully self supporting so I dont have to string any
support wires. I would like it to reach the 8 foot top of the fence, but
then would prune it from going any further otherwise it would interfere
with the top of the beech hedge.

Any ideas? Also, if I go with Ivy, once it is established, could I plant a
climbing Rose with each Ivy plant and let the Rose climb through the Ivy?

All opinions gratefully recieved.

Thanks,


Alasdair


It can be very aggressive but if you get a slower growing bi-coloured one it
will not only cover your eyesore but will be manageable and pleasing to look
at. 'Goldheart' is slower growing than common ivy but still grows quickly
and to its credit lights up a dark corner. I have a white and green one
which is small leaved and very slow growing but I don't know the type. I
suggest you consult an ivy specialist, there are many types.

Mary



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Old 21-04-2008, 12:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please


"Mary Fisher" wrote in message
t...

"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Dear All,

I am in the process of erecting an 8 foot high concrete post and panel
wall between my house and the nearby road. Once it's complete, it will
need something to cover it completely as it's not particularly
attractive. I was originally thinking of covering it with closeboard
fencing, but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look a
lot nicer.

The wall runs approximately north to south, the east facing side is
towards the road, but is hidden from the road by a 14 foot high beech
hedge. The westward side faces the house, but the house shades it from
the sun. It does get a bit of sun each day, but is predominantly shady.
There is about 10 feet between the house and the wall, and the area is
brick paved. I intend to take about 1 sq. foot of the brick paving out at
the bottom centre of each fence bay (10 bays, each 6 foot wide) so that I
can root a plant into soil. The soil in the area is mainly clay, although
curiously, we seem to have a fairly decent loam in our garden.

So - what varieties of Ivy would fairly quickly cover the entire wall and
look good? Or is there a similar climber I should think about. Ideally, I
want something that is fully self supporting so I dont have to string any
support wires. I would like it to reach the 8 foot top of the fence, but
then would prune it from going any further otherwise it would interfere
with the top of the beech hedge.

Any ideas? Also, if I go with Ivy, once it is established, could I plant
a climbing Rose with each Ivy plant and let the Rose climb through the
Ivy?

All opinions gratefully recieved.

Thanks,


Alasdair


It can be very aggressive but if you get a slower growing bi-coloured one
it will not only cover your eyesore but will be manageable and pleasing to
look at. 'Goldheart' is slower growing than common ivy but still grows
quickly and to its credit lights up a dark corner. I have a white and
green one which is small leaved and very slow growing but I don't know the
type. I suggest you consult an ivy specialist, there are many types.

I am growing 'Paddy's Pride' or Sulphurheart it may also be known as, it
took a couple of years to get going but it has large leaves with yellow
patches, that's quite nice.

I also have a green/white variegated variety climbing a fence, that has
taken maybe two or three years to get to the top, 6', in a shady area.

I did also see a variety called buttercup I think, small, butter yellow
leaves ( Anchor butter anyway :0). That is quite different and may well be
slow growing as it may not use the light effeciently.

You may have to send away for the ivy of your choice. Try mixing yellow
ivies with variegated ones perhaps?

Andy.




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Old 21-04-2008, 04:24 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

Mary Fisher wrote:
"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Dear All,


snippy

It can be very aggressive but if you get a slower growing bi-coloured
one it will not only cover your eyesore but will be manageable and
pleasing to look at. 'Goldheart' is slower growing than common ivy
but still grows quickly and to its credit lights up a dark corner. I
have a white and green one which is small leaved and very slow
growing but I don't know the type. I suggest you consult an ivy
specialist, there are many types.
Mary


I agree. I had a varigated one on a wall for years. 'Prune' with shears when
ever you pass it......no probs.
However, if in the future you decide to get rid of it...............that's a
whole different kettle of fish!
--
Pete C
London UK


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Old 21-04-2008, 07:20 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.


My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps") is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


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Old 21-04-2008, 10:02 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.


My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps") is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour
of "DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the
downside.....however, if i do plant it, it will be a location that's
easy to prune - I can just run the hedge trimmer along the top and
sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they
will need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots
of other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline
conditions. Does this make sense?

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Old 21-04-2008, 10:44 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,441
Default Advice on Ivy please


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.


My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps")
is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour of
"DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the downside.....however, if
i do plant it, it will be a location that's easy to prune - I can just run
the hedge trimmer along the top and sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they will
need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots of
other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline conditions.
Does this make sense?


No idea, I've grown it in all sorts of places.

But the bases of most walls are likely to be alkaline if only forom leaching
of snots, concrete walls willl obviously leach more alkali than that which
just comes from mortar.

Before you decide against ivies do look around at what's available, there
really are several which aren't quick growing and need very little or even
no maintenance. The advantage over most other climbers is that they are
evergreen so clad the wall even during winter. Other climbers, no matter how
pretty in flower or coloured leaf, have their own drawbacks.

Also, ivies afford shelter to wildlife so will encourage birds into your
garden.

Mary


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Old 21-04-2008, 11:06 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

In article [email protected],
says...
On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.


My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps") is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour
of "DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the
downside.....however, if i do plant it, it will be a location that's
easy to prune - I can just run the hedge trimmer along the top and
sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they
will need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and
www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots
of other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline
conditions. Does this make sense?


Coloured leafed ivies retain their leaf coloursbetter on alkaline soils
hence the lime advice.

As to pruning issues it takes but a few seconds to give them the once
over with a strimmer and I realy think people get a bit harsh in their
condemnation of everything Hedera! if its not a house its not likely to
cause any expensive damage and it does do the job.
Other contenders
Trachelospermum, Hydrangea, Schizophragma, will all do a good job of self
clinging too but all will stick out further than Ivy (Eventually)
--
Charlie Pridham, Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of national collections of Clematis viticella cultivars and
Lapageria rosea


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Old 21-04-2008, 11:42 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Advice on Ivy please

On 2008-04-21 09:44:14 +0100, "Mary Fisher" said:


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.

My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps")
is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour of
"DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the downside.....however, if
i do plant it, it will be a location that's easy to prune - I can just run
the hedge trimmer along the top and sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they will
need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots of
other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline conditions.
Does this make sense?


No idea, I've grown it in all sorts of places.

But the bases of most walls are likely to be alkaline if only forom leaching
of snots, concrete walls willl obviously leach more alkali than that which
just comes from mortar.


Good point!


Before you decide against ivies do look around at what's available, there
really are several which aren't quick growing and need very little or even
no maintenance. The advantage over most other climbers is that they are
evergreen so clad the wall even during winter. Other climbers, no matter how
pretty in flower or coloured leaf, have their own drawbacks.


That's why I'm leaning towards the Ivy approach - so far the only
drawback seems to be pruning, which I think will be manageable anyway.

I like the idea of a small leafed variety as I think it will just look
better....


Also, ivies afford shelter to wildlife so will encourage birds into your
garden.


What - more birds! We're already overrun with them....I get all kinds
of birds here, from Barn Owls, Herons, Kestrels....there's even a
couple of Parrots that must have escaped from somewhere...

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Old 21-04-2008, 11:54 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
adm adm is offline
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Posts: 47
Default Advice on Ivy please

On 2008-04-21 10:06:53 +0100, Charlie Pridham
said:

In article 2008042109020616807-adm[email protected],
says...
On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.

My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps") is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.


Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour
of "DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the
downside.....however, if i do plant it, it will be a location that's
easy to prune - I can just run the hedge trimmer along the top and
sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they
will need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and
www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots
of other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline
conditions. Does this make sense?


Coloured leafed ivies retain their leaf coloursbetter on alkaline soils
hence the lime advice.


Ah...so that's it.


As to pruning issues it takes but a few seconds to give them the once
over with a strimmer and I realy think people get a bit harsh in their
condemnation of everything Hedera! if its not a house its not likely to
cause any expensive damage and it does do the job.


It's not a house, and it's really, really unlikley to be able to do any
damage to 12 tonnes of precast concrete! SO I'm not worried about that
at all. If I can get away with pruning a few times a year, I'll be
happy. It's going to take a few years to cover the wall anyway - it's 8
feet high and 60 feet long.

Other contenders
Trachelospermum,


That looks nice and is evergreen but probably needs more sun than we
get in this location

Hydrangea


Very pretty, but looks like it would get bushy rather than cling flat
to the wall.

Schizophragma, will all do a good job of self


Deciduous? So won't provide cover all year round.

clinging too but all will stick out further than Ivy (Eventually)


Thanks for the tips - looks like Ivy is still probably the best choice
for what I need.




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Old 21-04-2008, 01:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,441
Default Advice on Ivy please


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On 2008-04-21 09:44:14 +0100, "Mary Fisher"
said:


"adm" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On 2008-04-21 06:20:41 +0100, "FarmI" [email protected] be given said:

"adm" wrote in message news:2008042012050416807-

but then thought that Ivy or a similar wall climber might look
a lot nicer.

My advice for Ivy is: Don't! Find something else.

The old adage for Ivy ("first it sleeps, then it creeps, then it
leaps")
is
very true as I know from the multiple ivys I've spent (unsuccessfully)
trying to exterminate in my yard.

Thanks for all the advise so far! It seems to be about 4 to 2 in favour
of
"DON'T DO IT".....with constant pruning being the downside.....however,
if
i do plant it, it will be a location that's easy to prune - I can just
run
the hedge trimmer along the top and sides of the wall every month or so.

As for ever wanting to remove it, I remember the mess the roots make on
walls from my old days as a roofer. However, this is gong to be a cover
plant for an ugly but neccesary boundary wall and is not likley to ever
need to be removed - and if it is, it would be replaced with something
else unless bare concrete suddenly becomes the height of fashion!

Does anyone know of a better wall covering plant that will grow up a
concrete wall unsupported? I suppose if neccesary, I could string wires
along the face of the wall for support, but would rather not as they
will
need to be replaced every few years.

I've had a scout around on 'tinternet and www.fibrex.co.uk seem to have
several hundred varieties of Ivy - including Goldheart as well as lots
of
other nicely coloured ones. I also read that when planting Ivy, you
should put a handful of lime in the hole as it likes alkaline
conditions.
Does this make sense?


No idea, I've grown it in all sorts of places.

But the bases of most walls are likely to be alkaline if only forom
leaching
of snots, concrete walls willl obviously leach more alkali than that
which
just comes from mortar.


Good point!


Before you decide against ivies do look around at what's available, there
really are several which aren't quick growing and need very little or
even
no maintenance. The advantage over most other climbers is that they are
evergreen so clad the wall even during winter. Other climbers, no matter
how
pretty in flower or coloured leaf, have their own drawbacks.


That's why I'm leaning towards the Ivy approach - so far the only drawback
seems to be pruning, which I think will be manageable anyway.

I like the idea of a small leafed variety as I think it will just look
better....


Also, ivies afford shelter to wildlife so will encourage birds into your
garden.


What - more birds! We're already overrun with them....I get all kinds of
birds here, from Barn Owls, Herons, Kestrels....there's even a couple of
Parrots that must have escaped from somewhere...


Lucky you!

We once found a parrot in one of our trees. We brought it indoors and rang
the police. The owner had been frantic and gave us 40 reward!

Mary



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Old 21-04-2008, 05:22 PM
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Quote:

Lucky you!

We once found a parrot in one of our trees. We brought it indoors and rang
the police. The owner had been frantic and gave us 40 reward!

Mary
A mate of mine breeds parrots, he sells a couple and goes of to the Seychelles for a few weeks on the proceeds. He does this a couple of times a year.
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Old 21-04-2008, 09:46 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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In message [email protected], adm
writes
On 2008-04-21 10:06:53 +0100, Charlie Pridham
said:


Hydrangea


Very pretty, but looks like it would get bushy rather than cling flat
to the wall.


I think Charlie probably meant Climbing Hydrangea. A different thing
from the nomral Hydrangea



--
Chris French



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