Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 20-04-2008, 10:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Apr 2008
Posts: 2
Default Using water that has been boiled for watering pot plants

anyone has any idea if it is a wise idea to use water that has been
boiled for watering pot plants? I drink quite a lot of tee and there's
always some water left in my kettle. shouldn't that bee a good thing
since the water should contain less lime?

  #2   Report Post  
Old 21-04-2008, 11:05 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2004
Posts: 109
Default Using water that has been boiled for watering pot plants

On 20 Apr, 22:54, Anne Jackson wrote:
The message from Stefan contains these words:

anyone has any idea if it is a wise idea to use water that has
been boiled for watering pot plants? I drink quite a lot of tee
and there's always some water left in my kettle. shouldn't that
bee a good thing since the water should contain less lime?


I use rainwater or spring water for my houseplants; since
I live in a soft water area, so I really can't advise you.


Not much help to the OP, then.

I also know exactly how much water to put in the kettle for two or
four cups of tea, so I never boil water to leave in the kettle. *


Good point. But there's usually at least a small amount of water left
over which can be decanted into a watering-can each time for later
use. And yes, Stefan, on the whole it is a good idea to use boiled
water on your houseplants as some of the carbonates will have
precipitated out of the solution (and onto the inside of your kettle).
  #3   Report Post  
Old 23-04-2008, 09:21 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 44
Default Using water that has been boiled for watering pot plants




"Ornata" wrote in message
...
On 20 Apr, 22:54, Anne Jackson wrote:
The message from Stefan contains these words:

anyone has any idea if it is a wise idea to use water that has
been boiled for watering pot plants? I drink quite a lot of tee
and there's always some water left in my kettle. shouldn't that
bee a good thing since the water should contain less lime?


I use rainwater or spring water for my houseplants; since
I live in a soft water area, so I really can't advise you.


Not much help to the OP, then.

I also know exactly how much water to put in the kettle for two or
four cups of tea, so I never boil water to leave in the kettle.


Good point. But there's usually at least a small amount of water left
over which can be decanted into a watering-can each time for later
use. And yes, Stefan, on the whole it is a good idea to use boiled
water on your houseplants as some of the carbonates will have
precipitated out of the solution (and onto the inside of your kettle).

And of course any chlorine used in the treatment works will have been driven
off
Derek




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
watering pot plants john ryan[_2_] United Kingdom 8 12-07-2011 11:52 PM
Black marks on boiled (shop bought) potatoes? Apples United Kingdom 9 23-08-2010 04:40 PM
offer:flower pot,Products including Ceramic Flower Pot,Imitate Porcelain Flower Pot,Wood Flower Pot,Stone Flower Pot,Imitate Stone Flower Pot,Hanging Flower Pot,Flower Pot Wall Hanging,Bonsai Pots,Root Carving&Hydroponics Pots [email protected] Texas 0 07-09-2004 07:55 PM
Being Boiled Hurts Peter United Kingdom 3 15-08-2004 02:54 PM
Boiled water in the garden Yvonne Australia 10 27-01-2004 08:02 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:59 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017