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Old 08-03-2009, 11:05 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rasberry Cane Pruning.

I am about to tackle a thicket of autumn fruiting rasberries.
How should they be pruned and when?
I've been told that it might be different to earlier fruiting rasberries.

Thanks

mark



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Old 09-03-2009, 06:24 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rasberry Cane Pruning.

In message , mark
writes
I am about to tackle a thicket of autumn fruiting rasberries.
How should they be pruned and when?
I've been told that it might be different to earlier fruiting rasberries.

Thanks

mark


Summer fruiting raspberry canes are "biennial" - they grow one year, and
fruit the next. So in that case you cut out the old canes that have
fruited, leaving the newer canes for next year.

Autumn fruiting raspberry canes are "annual" - they grow and fruit in
one year. So you can cut autumn fruiting raspberries down to the ground
after fruiting. You don't have to be that rigorous - if a cane is
producing side shoots you can cut it back to where the buds are
breaking, and you'll probably get an earlier start to the cropping
season.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profiles0600/cane_bush.asp
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&a...ng+raspberries
--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 09-03-2009, 11:16 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Rasberry Cane Pruning.

The message
from Stewart Robert Hinsley contains these words:
In message , mark
writes
I am about to tackle a thicket of autumn fruiting rasberries.
How should they be pruned and when?
I've been told that it might be different to earlier fruiting rasberries.


Summer fruiting raspberry canes are "biennial" - they grow one year, and
fruit the next. So in that case you cut out the old canes that have
fruited, leaving the newer canes for next year.


Autumn fruiting raspberry canes are "annual" - they grow and fruit in
one year. So you can cut autumn fruiting raspberries down to the ground
after fruiting. You don't have to be that rigorous - if a cane is
producing side shoots you can cut it back to where the buds are
breaking, and you'll probably get an earlier start to the cropping
season.


Following an earlier question here about taking cuttings from
raspberries, I felled my autumn raspberry and cut the canes with buds
into foot-ish lengths, and have left them planted in potting compost
over winter.

The buds are now bursting, but I haven't investigated the canes'
subterranean regions for roots yet - I'll do that when (if) they begin
to look as if they're growing.

Watch this space...

--
Rusty
Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk


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