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Old 13-04-2009, 09:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Blood Fish and Bone

The question about peeing on compost reminded me of a question I would like
to ask.....

If I cook (fry) myself a piece of unfilleted fish could I put the remains in
the blender and make myself fish bone? And if I remove the head before
cooking and blend that raw do I get blood fish and bone? The answer in
purely literal terms to both questions is "yes" but then is either of any
use as a garden fertiliser?


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Old 13-04-2009, 09:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Blood Fish and Bone

The message
from "Graham Harrison" contains
these words:

The question about peeing on compost reminded me of a question I would like
to ask.....


If I cook (fry) myself a piece of unfilleted fish could I put the
remains in
the blender and make myself fish bone? And if I remove the head before
cooking and blend that raw do I get blood fish and bone? The answer in
purely literal terms to both questions is "yes" but then is either of any
use as a garden fertiliser?


Up to a point, Lord Copper.

The blood constituent is usually gash blood from abattoirs, and from
condemned cattle. (In the widest meaning of cattle)

The fish bit is fishmeal, and that is the dried offal, fins, tails,
heads, (otherwise) useless fish (and a lot caught for the purpose).

Bone is provided by cattle again, and is taken from condemned carcases too.

While your fish-in-a-liquidiser will be useful, it won't have nearly as
long-lasting effects as stuff made from the usual sources, and it won't
have the same amount of nitrogen, as the blood content will be low.

I seal-up bones in plastic bags until I want to plant something woody
(I'm planting a persimmon over the last resting place of a roe deer) I
bung those at the bottom of the pit, and add any old leather I can lay
my hands on, and any moffed or otherwise worn-out woollens as the
next-best-thing to a carcase.

--
Rusty
Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk
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Old 13-04-2009, 09:47 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Blood Fish and Bone

Graham Harrison wrote:
The question about peeing on compost reminded me of a question I
would like to ask.....

If I cook (fry) myself a piece of unfilleted fish could I put the
remains in the blender and make myself fish bone? And if I remove
the head before cooking and blend that raw do I get blood fish and
bone? The answer in purely literal terms to both questions is "yes"
but then is either of any use as a garden fertiliser?


Yes, didn't the pilgrim fathers learn from the native American Indians how
to drop in a dead fish with each kernel of corn, only to be stunned when the
pilgrims decided to use dead Indians instead.

--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008


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Old 13-04-2009, 10:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Blood Fish and Bone


"Graham Harrison" wrote in message
...
The question about peeing on compost reminded me of a question I would
like to ask.....

If I cook (fry) myself a piece of unfilleted fish could I put the remains
in the blender and make myself fish bone? And if I remove the head
before cooking and blend that raw do I get blood fish and bone? The
answer in purely literal terms to both questions is "yes" but then is
either of any use as a garden fertiliser?


Yes is the basic answer but, of course, just as in using blood, fish and
bone, you will have trouble with interested foxes, dogs, cats, rats, other
carrion eaters. Neither can the 'dose' be measured but, if you're okay with
that, you've got yourself a fertiliser.

I vaguely remember a Gardeners' World presenter (Geoff Hamilton, perhaps?)
burying a heap of chopped fish, then planting something in the earth on top
of it. Alas, I don't remember the outcome. Perhaps someone else here will.

Spider


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Old 13-04-2009, 11:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 436
Default Blood Fish and Bone

On Mon, 13 Apr 2009, Spider wrote:

"Graham Harrison" wrote in message
...
The question about peeing on compost reminded me of a question I would
like to ask.....

If I cook (fry) myself a piece of unfilleted fish could I put the remains
in the blender and make myself fish bone? And if I remove the head
before cooking and blend that raw do I get blood fish and bone? The
answer in purely literal terms to both questions is "yes" but then is
either of any use as a garden fertiliser?


Yes is the basic answer but, of course, just as in using blood, fish and
bone, you will have trouble with interested foxes, dogs, cats, rats, other
carrion eaters. Neither can the 'dose' be measured but, if you're okay with
that, you've got yourself a fertiliser.

I vaguely remember a Gardeners' World presenter (Geoff Hamilton, perhaps?)
burying a heap of chopped fish, then planting something in the earth on top
of it. Alas, I don't remember the outcome. Perhaps someone else here will.


I heard once that it was the custom (where? - I don't know) when
planting a new rose to put a dead fish in the bottom of the hole.

David

--
David Rance
writing from Le Mesnil Villement, Calvados, France


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Old 14-04-2009, 01:26 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Blood Fish and Bone

The message
from Janet Baraclough contains these words:

I've put our dead cats, roadkill, stripped chicken carcases (after
they'd been boiled for stock) , fish heads, my dog's old beef bones,
into planting holes
for roses (and rhubarb). Dig the hole deeper than normal , carcase at
the bottom, a little earth on top then plant as usual. The roots will
quickly reach down to the feed.
I've done this for decades and never had any of the graves dug up or
plants disturbed, by pets or wildlife.


I dug a deep hole and filled the bottom with old bones, then planted a
vine over it.

A rat decided to do some bone mining, but he chose the wrong time to
emerge, and joined the nutrients...

--
Rusty
Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk


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