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Old 19-02-2010, 11:58 AM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.



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Old 19-02-2010, 12:16 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

On Feb 19, 10:58*pm, "john bently" wrote:
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? *Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? *Thanks for any advice.


John

First step would be to think about the style of walking you're
interested in doing.

Maybe starting out you would be more likely to go on shorter walks on
good tracks in National Parks or other well maintained bush tracks,
generally in better weather. At that end you could even start with
sand shoes, or like hikers.

Mid hikers would be more suitable for slightly harder walks,and then
there are a variety of "full" boots for the really serious walker

John r
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Old 19-02-2010, 12:20 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

john bently wrote:
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


Reviews are of little use beyond telling you what conditions a certain
pair can be expected to handle.

And they are of little use (and anecdotes of goodness of little use
alongside them) because the absolutely crucial point is fit. There is a
lot more to a shoe-size as to how well a boot fits as feet are complex 3
dimensional shapes and so are boots. it doesn't matter if they're
lasted and stitched by God's Own Right Hand if they're a different shape
to your feet. For example, my wife and I have quite different foot
shapes: I like Scarpa and Teva, she doesn't like either.

So I'd suggest you find a good shop that knows its boot-fitting (tell us
where you are and suggestions can be made).

Also, don't assume you need boots. I do most of my walking in shoes and
sandals because they're lighter and have less stuff to rub, so more
comfort, less tiring to walk in and less chance of rubbing (and
blisters). Folk go on and on about ankle support being necessary, but
the fact is that human ankles are perfectly adequate for walking and
shouldn't need any extra propping up most of the time. Some things,
like edging skis or standing on your toes on a tiny hold or carrying
outsize loads ankles haven't evolved to carry, do benefit from extra
ankle support, but /walking/ is actually harder as your foot is more
restricted from normal flexing. Some boots benefit from being stiffer,
for example to take crampons or walking over very rough stone paths, but
in other places again they just prevent your foot from conforming
naturally to the terrain and make walking more tiring.

In summary, try on a good selection with a good fitter (who can do
things like add volume adjusters and short-cut to models/brands suitable
for you foot-shape) and depending on where and what you have in mind
don't assume you particularly need boots.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
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Old 19-02-2010, 12:41 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

In message , john bently
writes
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


I have some very good walking shoes by Merrill. They are like trainers
only heavier and are waterproof as well as being warm. they are lighter
than the leather boots I have for walking and give a good support. The
cost was around 70GBP but they may have gone up in price a little since
2008, when I bought mine. HTH
--
June Hughes
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Old 19-02-2010, 01:26 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Posts: 5,056
Default walking boots-- which are good?



"john bently" wrote ...
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was
done way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any
advice.


There are some excellent makes out there, I myself use a pair of old
Zamberlan Civetta classic leather boots but also have a pair of Meindl
approach shoes for the better weather, actually bought them after a fall on
Exmoor made it impossible to wear my boots for nearly two years due to
Achillies Heel damage.
The important thing is do they fit and feel comfortable and have they got a
good grippy sole. (Vibram is THE sole make)
Look for a shop that will allow you to try the boots on for some time and
walk around in them, some even have slopes etc for you to walk on to make
sure they fit and don't hurt your toes on downward slopes etc. Some even
allow you change the boots provided you haven't walked outside in them so
you can walk around at home for some time to ensure they stay comfortable
over time.
Make sure you take your thick walking socks and liners with you and don't be
precious about the size, comfortable fit is the only consideration.
If you are spending 130+ on good leather boots to last most of a lifetime
you have to get it right, approach shoes cost about 60 but are not
all-weather.

http://www.zamberlan.uk.com/
http://www.meindl.de/english/index.html

--
Regards
Bob Hobden
W.of London. UK





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Old 19-02-2010, 01:49 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

On Fri, 19 Feb 2010 11:58:52 -0000, "john bently"
wrote:

Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


After you've got the boots, don't forget that it's virtually illegal
nowadays to walk outside the house without the use of Nordic Walking
Sticks, even if you're just popping round the corner for a paper.



--
(`. .)
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Old 19-02-2010, 01:51 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Posts: 38
Default walking boots-- which are good?

Bob Hobden wrote:

If you are spending 130+ on good leather boots to last most of a
lifetime you have to get it right, approach shoes cost about 60 but are
not all-weather.


What weather aren't they?

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
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Old 19-02-2010, 02:02 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Posts: 38
Default walking boots-- which are good?

wrote:

After you've got the boots, don't forget that it's virtually illegal
nowadays to walk outside the house without the use of Nordic Walking
Sticks, even if you're just popping round the corner for a paper.


Note that trekking poles and Nordic Walking sticks have some overlap but
may be rather different. NW is an exercise regime and the poling
technique is meant to burn energy. Use of trekking poles, like other
walking sticks, is to give balance and spread load.

NW poles often have glove-type grips, which are great for power transfer
into the poles but a PITA on a walking stick because they're so awkward
in and out.

For more on trekking poles, see
http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/poles.htm

(I like them on a really big day, but for most walking I prefer to do
without as they just get in the way.)

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
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Old 19-02-2010, 02:03 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

On Fri, 19 Feb 2010 11:58:52 -0000, john bently
wrote:

Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was
done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that
are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any
advice.



You may want to have a look at http://www.outdoorsmagic.com for reviews.
If you are prepared to pay around 100/150ukp Scarpa do a very good range.

--
rbel
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Old 19-02-2010, 02:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

In message , June Hughes
writes
In message , john bently
writes
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


I have some very good walking shoes by Merrill. They are like trainers
only heavier and are waterproof as well as being warm. they are
lighter than the leather boots I have for walking and give a good
support. The cost was around 70GBP but they may have gone up in price
a little since 2008, when I bought mine. HTH


If it hasn't been mentioned before, there is a newsgroup for walkers
which offers an FAQ on boots and walking footwear. May I suggest you
subscribe and post to uk.rec.walking. The group is extremely
knowledgeable and very helpful.

--
Gopher .... I know my place!


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Old 19-02-2010, 03:05 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

rbel wrote:

You may want to have a look at http://www.outdoorsmagic.com for
reviews.


I'm an OM user and do reviews for the site from time to time... but I'd
be very wary of them. Consumer reviews often polarise into "this is
great" or "this sucks", as a way of underlining to oneself that you
bought the Best Thing, or getting back at the purveyor of something
perceived to have let you down. As the OM review writing guide notes,
most gear /should/ be 3 star, but there's an outsize incidence of 5
start reviews... It's also the case that user-reviewers seldom have
much to comparatively test against, and even if they did they'd rate a
boot the right shape much higher than an otherwise identical built on a
last that might better fit a prospective buyer.

If you are prepared to pay around 100/150ukp Scarpa do a very
good range.


They're only good if they happen to be the right shape for you. They
are for /me/, but I've friends and acquaintances that hate them with a
passion. Similarly, La Sportiva are very nice... for some people other
than me.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
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Old 19-02-2010, 03:08 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

Peter Clinch wrote:
Also, don't assume you need boots.


In fact, assume that you don't. Get a well fitting running shoe, or a
lightweight trail shoe. Boots are overkill for most hiking. Lightweight
shoes will allow you to use a more natural stride, and will be less
effort to walk in.
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Old 19-02-2010, 03:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

In message , Gopher
writes
In message , June Hughes
writes
In message , john bently
writes
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


I have some very good walking shoes by Merrill. They are like
trainers only heavier and are waterproof as well as being warm. they
are lighter than the leather boots I have for walking and give a good
support. The cost was around 70GBP but they may have gone up in price
a little since 2008, when I bought mine. HTH


If it hasn't been mentioned before, there is a newsgroup for walkers
which offers an FAQ on boots and walking footwear. May I suggest you
subscribe and post to uk.rec.walking. The group is extremely
knowledgeable and very helpful.

The op cross-posted to a selection of groups (including uk.rec.walking).
Hence the whole selection of groups except this one being stripped out
in my reply. If he is that interested, which I doubt, he will look here
for an answer.
--
June Hughes
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Old 19-02-2010, 03:19 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

On Fri, 19 Feb 2010 14:45:42 +0000, Gopher wrote:

In message , June Hughes
writes
In message , john bently
writes
Now i have retired I would like to start walking. Would anyone know of a
good place to see some *critical* reviews of the different walking boots
available please? Apparently the last consumers association review was done
way back in april 2006.

Or would anyone know of some boots (preferably not too expensive) that are
generally believed by many people to be a good buy? Thanks for any advice.


I have some very good walking shoes by Merrill. They are like trainers
only heavier and are waterproof as well as being warm. they are
lighter than the leather boots I have for walking and give a good
support. The cost was around 70GBP but they may have gone up in price
a little since 2008, when I bought mine. HTH


If it hasn't been mentioned before, there is a newsgroup for walkers
which offers an FAQ on boots and walking footwear. May I suggest you
subscribe and post to uk.rec.walking. The group is extremely
knowledgeable and very helpful.


May I point out that the original poster included uk.rec.walking in
the submission of his query to several cross-posted groups.

--
(`. .)
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Old 19-02-2010, 03:34 PM posted to uk.rec.walking,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.birdwatching,misc.consumers.frugal-living,alt.rec.hiking
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Default walking boots-- which are good?

Scott Bryce wrote:
Peter Clinch wrote:
Also, don't assume you need boots.


In fact, assume that you don't. Get a well fitting running shoe, or a
lightweight trail shoe. Boots are overkill for most hiking. Lightweight
shoes will allow you to use a more natural stride, and will be less
effort to walk in.


Indeed. Worth noting with running shoes is that not all grip patterns
are up to much off-road. You want some degree of cleats/studs/lugs to
deal with mud, unless you like sitting down a lot...

The more flexible the sole the more you'll get sore feet walking on hard
and uneven surfaces, but the less effort you'll waste on soft and/or
even ones.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/


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