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Old 09-05-2012, 02:11 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pruning a mature horse chestnut



"Rod" wrote in message
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On Monday, 7 May 2012 17:00:39 UTC+1, Sacha wrote:


I would certainly check there isn't a TPO on the tree but if there
isn't, the enquiry may result in one being slapped on it, so you have
to be aware of that! It is the wrong time of year to be pruning or
cutting back but apart from that, your neighbour and this tree man
should be thinking of birds that may be nesting in it. In your
situation, I would insist on a proper tree surgeon. I have a nasty
feeling this is going to look a mess if it's not done properly because
you're dealing with a mature tree. Anyone wielding a chainsaw can have
a card printed suggesting they do such work but not everyone can do it
well. It takes an hour to wreck a tree which won't recover and decades
for one to grow. Insist on a tree surgeon who is properly trained. If
this man says he can do it next week I wouldn't employ him.
--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
www.hillhousenurserytearoom.com
South Devon


I wonder if a TPO might help the O/P?
I think work like crown reduction may be allowed on TPO'd trees under
certain conditions. In such a case the powers that be would absolutely
insist on qualified, approved operators.

Rod

I have two mature horse chestnut trees in my front garden both with TPOs. I
wasn't allowed to top them out at all and only allowed to cut or trim
branches up to a height of around 8' from the ground to allow in a little
more light. Although I quite like the trees they can be a pain with nearly
all round the year niggles, starting with sticky buds then flower petals
followed by the dreaded conkers with mountains of leaves bringing up the
rear! Both trees are on my front lawn so they do make a lot of clearing up
duties.

Harry

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Old 09-05-2012, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacha[_4_] View Post
On 2012-05-08 13:07:33 +0100, Chris Hogg said:

On Mon, 7 May 2012 17:05:55 -0700 (PDT), James Hunt
wrote:

On May 8, 12:46*am, Janet wrote:
"James Hunt" wrote in message
...
A mature horse chestnut about 20m high lies between my neighbours and
my garden, splitting our boundary fence.

He wants it cut down so he gets more sun in his garden, we want it
left as is - we've compromised on pruning the top 30% and removing as
much as possible from their side of the tree, sharing the costs.

*Insist on seeing the contractor's certificate of insurance for chainsaw
work... before agreeing the contract. If he is a trained and qualified
professional he will expect to be asked and be pleased to show it. If he
hasn't got one don't employ him.

* Janet


This is a reply to all comments thus far. Firstly thank you for yuor
feedback.

Secondly, as to my situation, we'll be pressing for a proper tree
surgeon (that we have used before). I think this feedback is enough to
halt my neighbour's plans.


If you really want to keep it in its present form, why not try and get
a tree preservation order (TPO) on it, assuming it hasn't already got
one?


Difficulties with the neighbours thereafter? It's a tricky one because
everyone is trying to satisfy the wishes of everyone else but I feel
it's going to end up looking a real mess. If it hasn't got a TPO on
it, I suspect both parties may end up wishing they'd just felled it.
Of course if it has got a TPO then they mess with it at their peril!
--
Sacha
Buy plants online, including rare and popular plant varieties from Hill House Nursery, mail order plant specialist
South Devon tearooms, Devon cream teas, tea garden, Totnes cafes, Staverton cafes, Ashburton cafes
South Devon
I don't know how low it is but would raising the canopy a bit by removing the lower branches perhaps allow sufficient light into the garden?
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Old 15-05-2012, 11:59 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pruning a mature horse chestnut


"James Hunt" wrote in message
...
A mature horse chestnut about 20m high lies between my neighbours and
my garden, splitting our boundary fence.

He wants it cut down so he gets more sun in his garden, we want it
left as is - we've compromised on pruning the top 30% and removing as
much as possible from their side of the tree, sharing the costs.

We've been emphatic throughout that we want the work done properly to
ensure the best chance that the tree survives the work.

They've brought somebody round to look at the tree to give them a
quote. His business card included tree lopping and tree pruning, but
also other more general jobs, so he's doesn't seem a specialist tree
surgeon.

He has told our neighbours that he can start work next week. However,
I thought that it was a bad idea to do major work on horse chestnuts
this early in the year on account of them being especially sappy at
this time which tended to exacerbate bug infections post tree
maintenance.

Can anyone confirm whether that's correct? If so, it sounds like the
man who has quoted our neighbours is either unknowledgeable about tree
work, or unscrupulous as to the health of the tree.


I would have thought it would be to the advantage of you both to get rid of
it completely!

Alan



Thanks.




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Old 16-05-2012, 12:04 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pruning a mature horse chestnut


"harry" wrote in message
...
On May 7, 4:35 pm, James Hunt wrote:
A mature horse chestnut about 20m high lies between my neighbours and
my garden, splitting our boundary fence.

He wants it cut down so he gets more sun in his garden, we want it
left as is - we've compromised on pruning the top 30% and removing as
much as possible from their side of the tree, sharing the costs.

We've been emphatic throughout that we want the work done properly to
ensure the best chance that the tree survives the work.

They've brought somebody round to look at the tree to give them a
quote. His business card included tree lopping and tree pruning, but
also other more general jobs, so he's doesn't seem a specialist tree
surgeon.

He has told our neighbours that he can start work next week. However,
I thought that it was a bad idea to do major work on horse chestnuts
this early in the year on account of them being especially sappy at
this time which tended to exacerbate bug infections post tree
maintenance.

Can anyone confirm whether that's correct? If so, it sounds like the
man who has quoted our neighbours is either unknowledgeable about tree
work, or unscrupulous as to the health of the tree.

Thanks.


Tree Preservation Orders. You need to find out if there is one.
http://www.communities.gov.uk/docume.../tposguide.pdf


If you have planted the trees why should there be a presurvation order on
it, it is yours to whatever you want with it!

Alan






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Old 16-05-2012, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Holmes[_5_] View Post


If you have planted the trees why should there be a presurvation order on
it, it is yours to whatever you want with it!

Alan
Not true. If there's a TPO you can't work on the tree without permission, even if you planted it yourself. And in a Conservation Area you have to give 6 weeks notice of any work on trees, including those you planted yourself, in case they want to slap a TPO on it.
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Old 07-08-2012, 12:58 PM
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Location: Manchester
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Hunt View Post
A mature horse chestnut about 20m high lies between my neighbours and
my garden, splitting our boundary fence.

He wants it cut down so he gets more sun in his garden, we want it
left as is - we've compromised on pruning the top 30% and removing as
much as possible from their side of the tree, sharing the costs.

We've been emphatic throughout that we want the work done properly to
ensure the best chance that the tree survives the work.

They've brought somebody round to look at the tree to give them a
quote. His business card included tree lopping and tree pruning, but
also other more general jobs, so he's doesn't seem a specialist tree
surgeon.

Treestyle Arboricultu Professional Tree Surgeons, Manchester Tree surgeon Manchester

He has told our neighbours that he can start work next week. However,
I thought that it was a bad idea to do major work on horse chestnuts
this early in the year on account of them being especially sappy at
this time which tended to exacerbate bug infections post tree
maintenance.

Can anyone confirm whether that's correct? If so, it sounds like the
man who has quoted our neighbours is either unknowledgeable about tree
work, or unscrupulous as to the health of the tree.

Thanks.
Hi

Anyone with tree lopping in their description is not a tree surgeon. They have not received any formal training and are unaware of the correct tree work terminology. Pruning a tree in mid summer is good as it is at a stage where its energy levels are at the highest and the tree gets a chance to adjust its physiology before the stress of winter. Reducing a crown on a horse chestnut should only remove approx 20 percent of the foliage and from the correct place. This prevents undue stress on the tree and may prevent to much reaction growth. To keep the tree at the density and size you need it needs to be repeated every two to three years which may cost between 3 and 5 hundred. If this is prohibitive then a one off payment to fell remove the tree may prove cost effective.
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Old 15-05-2020, 06:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pruning a mature horse chestnut

I would cut it in autumn . Then you know birds have gone , sap isn’t an issue if you use a bow saw , ban the polluting noisy chain saws .
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Old 15-05-2020, 06:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Pruning a mature horse chestnut

On 15/05/20 18:04, wrote:
I would cut it in autumn . Then you know birds have gone , sap isn’t an issue if you use a bow saw , ban the polluting noisy chain saws .


I wonder if the tree has grown much in the eight years since the OP?

--

Jeff


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