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Old 25-08-2013, 12:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 25/08/2013 12:05, Peter & Jeanne wrote:


"Jake" wrote in message
...




Not that long ago, I saw an advert for a battery hedge trimmer where
the battery was carried in a knapsack contraption on the back with
just a short cable to the tool. This may be an option to consider?


Yup - my grass trimmer (Aldi 29.99 iirc) works along the same lines.
Battery fits nicely in pocket - does about 20mins on full charge.

Regards
Pete




The lightweight bonus sounds good, but I may need more than 20 mins
worth of charge at a time. Nevertheless, since you and Jake have both
mentioned this type of portability, I will look into it.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay

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Old 25-08-2013, 12:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 12:52, 'Mike' wrote:
Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist. I know it is very
lightweight and I will see what it is and give you the details.

I know what you mean about the heavy machines. Since my second major
operation I am weak in the left arm and the mains hedge trimmer I have,
purchased when I was a lot younger with a huge garden, gets too heavy
after a few minutes, especially when working up a ladder.

I know exactly what you mean and want and will have a word with Julie or
Steve when they come in re the small one Julie uses

Mike



Thanks, Mike. I'll watch for you popping back here.




"Spider" wrote in message ...

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.



--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:00 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 14:00, David Hill wrote:
On 24/08/2013 12:52, 'Mike' wrote:
Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist. I know it is very
lightweight and I will see what it is and give you the details.

I know what you mean about the heavy machines. Since my second major
operation I am weak in the left arm and the mains hedge trimmer I have,
purchased when I was a lot younger with a huge garden, gets too heavy
after a few minutes, especially when working up a ladder.

I know exactly what you mean and want and will have a word with Julie or
Steve when they come in re the small one Julie uses

Mike



"Spider" wrote in message ...

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.

I have a petrol hedge cutter, but haven't used it much since I got my
Viking strimmer with hedge cutting attachment.
Having the longer reach, and a head you can adjust through a variety of
angles I find it much easier no lifting a weight overhead and holding it
there.
Not knowing how tall your hedges are, it's something to think about, not
saying you get a petrol strimmer but possibly something to think about,
most of the weight is taken on the shoulder strap.
David




Thanks for the thought, David. You do make it sound more manageable
than I had envisaged (I wasn't aware of the shoulder strap thing), but
I'm still not deeply chuffed about using - and storing - petrol. Having
discussed it with RG before replying, I find he's quite against it, so
I'm afraid it's a big thumbs down. Thanks nevertheless.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 15:32, Tim Watts wrote:
On Saturday 24 August 2013 14:00 David Hill wrote in uk.rec.gardening:

I have a petrol hedge cutter, but haven't used it much since I got my
Viking strimmer with hedge cutting attachment.
Having the longer reach, and a head you can adjust through a variety of
angles I find it much easier no lifting a weight overhead and holding it
there.
Not knowing how tall your hedges are, it's something to think about, not
saying you get a petrol strimmer but possibly something to think about,
most of the weight is taken on the shoulder strap.
David


I got one of these a couple of years back:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/7304280.htm

It is "adequate" - in my case it will trim about 50-70 linear feet of 4ft
high hawthorn (both sides and top). Fresh growth only and softer twigs upto
about 1/4"

The supplied 2 battery packs means I can get most of my hedge done in one
session.

It's weak compared to even a lightweight petrol trimmer, but it is:

1) Inexpensive;

2) No cables (a damn liability with a hedge trimmer of all things!)

3) Pretty light to handle.

4) Low hassle if you keep the batteries charged.

Warning - uses old style NiCd battery.

Look at the newer Bosch trimmers with a more modern Li-Ion battery, eg:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/1019911.htm

Could be better battery wise[1] but you'll need to check some reviews!

[1] I have a Bosch cordless screwdriver that uses the 10.8V LI-Ion battery
and it has been worked to death on a renovation job and the original battery
is still alive (it's a "Bosch Blue" pro tool rather than a "Bosch Green"
consumer tool, but I think the battery packs are the same.





Thanks Tim. Having looked at both, I am certainly more impressed with
the Lithium Ion batteries, so that will probably be the way to go. The
Bosch is a smart-looking tool, so I'll be looking closer at them. The
Bosch 54/20 36V looks quite good, so that's two to add to my short list.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 20:56, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 12:52:37 +0100, Mike wrote:

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist.


That is quite a good tip, a lot of the weight of a battery trimmer
will be in the batteries. The less weight you have on your arms and
having to wave about the better. Nice wide padded belt snug on your
hips will carry a lot more weight than you like on your arms. There
will of course be a cable from the pack to the cutter...




Thank you, Dave. Yes, I'm going to look into that type. I will Google
and see what the cable looks like.



TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.




TAs you say, it oughtn't to be a problem if common sense is applied, but
people have accidents just the same.

Having used a push mower for years and finding it so much easier than
getting the mower out .. getting the cable out .. opening a window from
inside .. running outside to plug the cable in .. moving both around the
garden as I work, then reversing the process at the end of the job, I
find I am so much happier just carrying the very light mower out and
working straight away without any restriction (apart from not mowing
another stripe down my cat's back!), that I am loathe to invite another
outdoor cable to my menagerie of tools.

To come to the point, I will certainly look into a pocketed battery if a
reasonable sized one is available. Atm, I'm looking at 36V or so.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay


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Old 25-08-2013, 01:29 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 21:33, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/24/2013 3:56 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.

Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.




:~((! Well, thank goodness you're still here. Someone has to tell us
how it shouldn't be done. The horse may have bolted, but at least the
stable door is firmly shut ;~). I'm sure you're now being very careful.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 25/08/2013 13:20, Jake wrote:
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 12:51:40 +0100, wrote:

On 25/08/2013 11:57, Jake wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 22:41:39 +0100, wrote:


I am stronger in the arms than, perhaps, some ladies, but sometimes have
weak and painful hands due to rheumatism.

Not that long ago, I saw an advert for a battery hedge trimmer where
the battery was carried in a knapsack contraption on the back with
just a short cable to the tool. This may be an option to consider?

The magazine will be in my rather large "Never chuck it out" pile and
I'd be happy to have a hunt if you can wait a day or three.




That sounds interesting, Jake. Yes, I'd be grateful if you could seek
it out, but don't worry if you can't find it. I could try googling if
your magazine has disappeared. Thank you.


Meanwhile, here's one to be going on with:

http://www.gtechonline.co.uk/garden-...e-trimmer.html

Note battery is built in so although it's light, you can't have a
charged battery ready to swap out.




Thanks, Jake. That does look light and rather nifty. I'll copy it to
RG for his comments. I was hoping for a two battery option, but it may
not be needed. That's why I need some help. Thanks very much for yours.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 12:54:15 +0100, Spider wrote:

Yup - my grass trimmer (Aldi 29.99 iirc) works along the same

lines.
Battery fits nicely in pocket - does about 20mins on full charge.


The lightweight bonus sounds good, but I may need more than 20 mins
worth of charge at a time.


The recharge time is important unless you have two batteries.

If you get 20 mins run time and 20 mins recharge, that's a resonable
working period then a rest for coffee, whilst you both recharge. B-)

Trouble is a fast charge like that really needs a "clever" charger
that will monitor the battery and shut off when it is charged. Cheap
kit tends not to come with such clever chargers...

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old 25-08-2013, 01:43 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 25/08/2013 13:33, Jake wrote:
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 13:20:33 +0100,
wrote:

Or there's this belt battery pack model:

http://www.worldofpower.co.uk/flymo-...e-trimmer.html

This site's cheaper than the one in the ad but I can't say it's the
cheapest of course.

I'll be quiet now till I find the one I'm looking for!




Thanks, Jake. That really does look light to handle! I'll ask RG about
the pros and cons of acid batteries over Li-ion types.

It doesn't matter if you're quiet or not now, 'cos I'm going into the
garden for a couple of hours ;~)). Will look in later.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 01:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 13:00:36 +0100, Spider wrote:

I'm still not deeply chuffed about using - and storing - petrol. Having
discussed it with RG before replying, I find he's quite against it, ...


You have diesel car? B-)

5 l of petrol in a sealed good metal can isn't a serious problem in
the garage out of sunlight. I wouldn't store it in the house though
and only refill the machine outside the garage/shed.

A small portable machine that can operate at almost any angle is
likely to be a two stroke so will need two stroke oil adding to the
fuel in the correct proportion. Mixer bottles are available for the
common 50:1 (fuelil) ratio.

--
Cheers
Dave.





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Old 25-08-2013, 01:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/25/2013 8:29 AM, Spider wrote:
On 24/08/2013 21:33, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/24/2013 3:56 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:
TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.

Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.


:~((! Well, thank goodness you're still here. Someone has to tell us
how it shouldn't be done. The horse may have bolted, but at least the
stable door is firmly shut ;~). I'm sure you're now being very careful.

_Extremely_ careful!
I'm also looking for a battery operated trimmer, as the bits needing
trimming are too far from the house to make a corded one practical, and
I don't like petrol powered tools.
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On 25/08/2013 13:44, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 13:00:36 +0100, Spider wrote:

I'm still not deeply chuffed about using - and storing - petrol. Having
discussed it with RG before replying, I find he's quite against it, ...


You have diesel car? B-)

5 l of petrol in a sealed good metal can isn't a serious problem in
the garage out of sunlight. I wouldn't store it in the house though
and only refill the machine outside the garage/shed.

A small portable machine that can operate at almost any angle is
likely to be a two stroke so will need two stroke oil adding to the
fuel in the correct proportion. Mixer bottles are available for the
common 50:1 (fuelil) ratio.




RG has. He's hardly got room in the garage for the car (had to hack one
skin of bricks off the wall so he could open the car door!!). That
aside, he just doesn't want to store it .. and I haven't got a shed :~((
.. yet.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 02:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 25/08/2013 13:45, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/25/2013 8:29 AM, Spider wrote:
On 24/08/2013 21:33, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/24/2013 3:56 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:
TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.

Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.


:~((! Well, thank goodness you're still here. Someone has to tell us
how it shouldn't be done. The horse may have bolted, but at least the
stable door is firmly shut ;~). I'm sure you're now being very careful.

_Extremely_ careful!
I'm also looking for a battery operated trimmer, as the bits needing
trimming are too far from the house to make a corded one practical, and
I don't like petrol powered tools.




Two of my yew trees are really too far from the house for cable and I
have ruled out petrol type trimmers, too.

If you like, I'll let you borrow a bit of my thread! ;~)).

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 02:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 25/08/2013 13:26, Spider wrote:
On 24/08/2013 20:56, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 12:52:37 +0100, Mike wrote:

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist.


That is quite a good tip, a lot of the weight of a battery trimmer
will be in the batteries. The less weight you have on your arms and
having to wave about the better. Nice wide padded belt snug on your
hips will carry a lot more weight than you like on your arms. There
will of course be a cable from the pack to the cutter...




Thank you, Dave. Yes, I'm going to look into that type. I will Google
and see what the cable looks like.



TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.




TAs you say, it oughtn't to be a problem if common sense is applied, but
people have accidents just the same.

Having used a push mower for years and finding it so much easier than
getting the mower out .. getting the cable out .. opening a window from
inside .. running outside to plug the cable in .. moving both around the
garden as I work, then reversing the process at the end of the job, I
find I am so much happier just carrying the very light mower out and
working straight away without any restriction (apart from not mowing
another stripe down my cat's back!), that I am loathe to invite another
outdoor cable to my menagerie of tools.

To come to the point, I will certainly look into a pocketed battery if a
reasonable sized one is available. Atm, I'm looking at 36V or so.

Which have a good set of reviews of hedge trimmers if you are a member,
for domestic cordless The Black & Decker GTC1850L is part of new range
of cordless trimmers. It boasts the same basic design as Black &
Decker's corded trimmers, but actually weighs less at only 2.8kg, even
with the compact lithium-ion battery fitted.
But The blade sheath is a bit tricky to refit for carrying and storing.

The lithium battery takes nearly eight hours to recharge, so make sure
the 20-minute or so cutting time is sufficient for your hedges. In our
experience, you should be able to trim 70sq m of hedge in that time.

Is there anything else I should know?
If you need a second battery this will set you back another 52.

Almost all of their best buys are corded.

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Old 25-08-2013, 03:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 8/25/2013 9:16 AM, Spider wrote:
On 25/08/2013 13:45, S Viemeister wrote:
I'm also looking for a battery operated trimmer, as the bits needing
trimming are too far from the house to make a corded one practical, and
I don't like petrol powered tools.


Two of my yew trees are really too far from the house for cable and I
have ruled out petrol type trimmers, too.

If you like, I'll let you borrow a bit of my thread! ;~)).

Spiderweb thread?



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