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Old 25-08-2013, 10:23 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 25/08/2013 15:09, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/25/2013 9:16 AM, Spider wrote:
On 25/08/2013 13:45, S Viemeister wrote:
I'm also looking for a battery operated trimmer, as the bits needing
trimming are too far from the house to make a corded one practical, and
I don't like petrol powered tools.


Two of my yew trees are really too far from the house for cable and I
have ruled out petrol type trimmers, too.

If you like, I'll let you borrow a bit of my thread! ;~)).

Spiderweb thread?




Too right! :~)). But but don't get in a tangle with it, heh heh.

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Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay

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Old 25-08-2013, 10:43 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 25/08/2013 14:35, David Hill wrote:
On 25/08/2013 13:26, Spider wrote:
On 24/08/2013 20:56, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 12:52:37 +0100, Mike wrote:

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist.

That is quite a good tip, a lot of the weight of a battery trimmer
will be in the batteries. The less weight you have on your arms and
having to wave about the better. Nice wide padded belt snug on your
hips will carry a lot more weight than you like on your arms. There
will of course be a cable from the pack to the cutter...




Thank you, Dave. Yes, I'm going to look into that type. I will Google
and see what the cable looks like.



TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.




TAs you say, it oughtn't to be a problem if common sense is applied, but
people have accidents just the same.

Having used a push mower for years and finding it so much easier than
getting the mower out .. getting the cable out .. opening a window from
inside .. running outside to plug the cable in .. moving both around the
garden as I work, then reversing the process at the end of the job, I
find I am so much happier just carrying the very light mower out and
working straight away without any restriction (apart from not mowing
another stripe down my cat's back!), that I am loathe to invite another
outdoor cable to my menagerie of tools.

To come to the point, I will certainly look into a pocketed battery if a
reasonable sized one is available. Atm, I'm looking at 36V or so.

Which have a good set of reviews of hedge trimmers if you are a member,
for domestic cordless The Black & Decker GTC1850L is part of new range
of cordless trimmers. It boasts the same basic design as Black &
Decker's corded trimmers, but actually weighs less at only 2.8kg, even
with the compact lithium-ion battery fitted.
But The blade sheath is a bit tricky to refit for carrying and storing.

The lithium battery takes nearly eight hours to recharge, so make sure
the 20-minute or so cutting time is sufficient for your hedges. In our
experience, you should be able to trim 70sq m of hedge in that time.

Is there anything else I should know?
If you need a second battery this will set you back another 52.

Almost all of their best buys are corded.



Alas, I'm not a member of Which? However, I've read a few reviews on
line, although not Black & Decker yet. There is a Bosch I've got half
an eye on. It's relatively expensive even without the second battery,
which I would like. However, RG thinks I may not need a second battery
if the first holds a long enough useable charge.

Before I decide, I shall Google the portable battery types to see what's
available. Again, RG thinks these may not be man enough for the work
I'll be doing (I spent part of today showing him the plant material I'll
be attacking), but there may be something we've not seen yet.

The only other (so far unanswered) query I wanted to resolve is the
matter of bulky handles for smaller ladies hands. It may be I'll just
have to visit a local 'shed' and heft one or two. Not that RG intends
to buy locally; he'll probably use Amazon or another reliable cheapish
online site that will deliver the next day.

Oh. Just thought of another question. In your experience, do power
trimmers 'kick' alarmingly when they meet a tough bit of branch they
don't like? I'm not otherwise too worried about using one, but that
sort of fright just might make me unusually girly.

You needn't hurry to answer that. It's way past my bedtime and I
haven't fed the cats yet :~(. Will have a look here in the morning.

Thanks for all your help.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 26-08-2013, 12:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 26/08/2013 12:08, Jake wrote:
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 22:43:16 +0100, wrote:



Oh. Just thought of another question. In your experience, do power
trimmers 'kick' alarmingly when they meet a tough bit of branch they
don't like? I'm not otherwise too worried about using one, but that
sort of fright just might make me unusually girly.

If a branch is too wide to fit between the teeth, it won't get in
there! If it fits in the gap then it should be within the machine's
capability. So I doubt you'll experience any kickback to worry about.

Indeed, given that a battery-powered motor will generally be weaker
than an electric or petrol one, I would expect that if the trimmer
encounters something too tough, it will simply stop and make a naughty
noise until you release the trigger.

However, I check hedge surfaces over before I start and if there is a
particularly thick branch I remove it with loppers (to a point below
the "trimming line") before I start with a hedge trimmer. Apart from
anything else, pushing the trimmer to its limit means the blades
blunt more quickly and round here sharpening is about 30 a time.




That all makes a great deal of sense and is most reassuring. Thanks,
Jake. Interestingly, I've already checked for stout close-to-surface
branches, so that's how I'll continue.

So far, the battery-carried-separately type (despite being very light)
may not be powerful enough. I am currently looking at a Bosch with
54/20 blade ratio and a 36V battery. The weight isn't too bad. There
is a more powerful one, but I doubt I'll need that. I know myself well
enough to know that I have to have a tool that I respect and which is a
little more powerful than I need so that it's working a little light of
its ultimate capability. So far, that Bosch model fits the bill *and*
RG is happy with it, too. If nothing else catches my eye soon, we will
be ordering that one. Naturally, I will report back here whichever I
choose, after I've given it some use.

Thank you so much for your most instructive advice, Jake.
Thanks also to everyone else who chipped in and helped shape my opinion.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 26-08-2013, 12:47 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/26/2013 7:36 AM, Spider wrote:

So far, the battery-carried-separately type (despite being very light)
may not be powerful enough. I am currently looking at a Bosch with
54/20 blade ratio and a 36V battery. The weight isn't too bad. There
is a more powerful one, but I doubt I'll need that. I know myself well
enough to know that I have to have a tool that I respect and which is a
little more powerful than I need so that it's working a little light of
its ultimate capability. So far, that Bosch model fits the bill *and*
RG is happy with it, too. If nothing else catches my eye soon, we will
be ordering that one. Naturally, I will report back here whichever I
choose, after I've given it some use.

I look forward to your report.

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Old 26-08-2013, 07:49 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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I am currently looking at a Bosch with
54/20 blade ratio and a 36V battery.


36 volts is certainly awesome on a drill


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Old 26-08-2013, 10:59 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 26/08/2013 12:57, Jake wrote:
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 13:36:18 +0100, wrote:

All hedgetrimmed

Found the ad. Sit down. Its for a Stihl (or is that Steal perhaps). I
looked on the web and the cheapest price I can find for the backpack
battery is 640. Add to that a Stihl or Viking trimmer which will cost
upwards of 350 and you're away. So probably something for the
professionals.

The December 2012 issue of Amateur Gardening has a comparison of 6
different battery models (including a Stihl which takes second place
and has a belt battery option which I guess will be a lot cheaper). If
you can't get hold of a copy locally, and would like to read, I can
try a scan to the web and link from here.




Thanks, Jake. I'm most grateful to you for seeking out the ad but,
crikey, they are a bit pricey! If I chose to, I could afford them, but
it makes my Yorkshire wallet muscles sore to think about it. As you
say, they're probably professional models. No doubt the pros can claim
part of the cost against tax.

After you've gone to all that trouble, I feel rather guilty as I made a
decision today and asked RG to put in an order for the Bosch. I don't
recall the model number well enough, but its the one with the 54/20
blade and 36V battery. I sincerely hope it's going to be okay. I was
just struggling in the garden this afternoon and felt the need of a
decent bit of kit.

Nevertheless, I will take the time to suss out the Stihl and Viking
machines, even if it's only to marvel at the price tags!, and also
because you've gone to some trouble on my behalf to find them. Thank
you, I do appreciate it.

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from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 26-08-2013, 11:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 26/08/2013 19:49, stuart noble wrote:
I am currently looking at a Bosch with
54/20 blade ratio and a 36V battery.


36 volts is certainly awesome on a drill




Well, I'm hoping my 36V trimmer will be awesome on my hedges:~). I'll
be sure to let everyone know.

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Old 27-08-2013, 02:19 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 27/08/2013 08:46, Martin wrote:
On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 14:17:53 +0100,
wrote:

On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 14:44:00 +0200, wrote:

Tell us what were number 1 and 3 first?

I found this on their website
http://www.amateurgardening.com/unca...ottage-series/


The web site's rubbish.


The bit about Carol Klein refers to what was already shown this year?

But the 15 December edition (to be more
precise) lists:

1st Metabo 36V AHS at 369.95 (scores 19 out of 20)
2nd Stihl HSA 65 at 359 (scores 18)
3rd CEL 18V at 99.99 (also scores 18 thanks to price but it's only an
18V model)
4th Wolf Li-ion Power 45V at 183.99 (16) NB this is 18V not 45!
5th Bosch 52CM AHS 52LI at 109.99 (15) Again 18V
6th Makita - no model specified - at 226.80 and just 14.4V (13)

Prices at time of publication. There was at that time an offer via
toolshop.co.uk of an additional "free" battery. The Stihl has an
optional extra of "battery belt with harness and bag" so there's the
option of battery in the motor housing or in the belt bag.

Makes me feel a bit on the wierd side when I realise that I now have 1
petrol hedgetrimmer, 3 mains electric ones and a small battery one
plus a little Bosch mini thing that's good for trimming heathers and
lavenders.


We have a little Bosch mini thing with a rechargeable battery. My wife
who uses it is not impressed, it's not very powerful and the battery
life is short. We have a mains Bosch hedge trimmer that we do
recommend




Well, we've finally ordered a battery-operated Bosch, so it will be
interesting to see how it performs. I need to get some goggles now,
otherwise I won't be able to use it.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 27-08-2013, 02:21 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/27/2013 9:19 AM, Spider wrote:

Well, we've finally ordered a battery-operated Bosch, so it will be
interesting to see how it performs. I need to get some goggles now,
otherwise I won't be able to use it.

Which model did you order?
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Old 27-08-2013, 03:14 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Tuesday 27 August 2013 14:19 Spider wrote in uk.rec.gardening:



Well, we've finally ordered a battery-operated Bosch, so it will be
interesting to see how it performs. I need to get some goggles now,
otherwise I won't be able to use it.


Please do give some feedback, including the model number

Stuff like this is always interesting to know!

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http://www.sensorly.com/ Crowd mapping of 2G/3G/4G mobile signal coverage



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Old 27-08-2013, 06:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Spider sorry it's been a long time in replying, but I have only just had the
chance to talk to Julie. We are both busy and our paths don't cross to
often, and when they do, we do tend to natter for a long time.

Anyway, she has a 'gtech' which if it is anything like the battery vacuum
cleaner, is superb. We have a Vacuum Cleaner at the theatre and we were so
impressed we bought one for home.

I believe the gardener now want a gtech battery hedge trimmer!!!!

(Thanks for the contacts re Bay Leaves. Should have replied to you all by
now)

Mike







"'Mike'" wrote in message ...

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist. I know it is very lightweight
and I will see what it is and give you the details.

I know what you mean about the heavy machines. Since my second major
operation I am weak in the left arm and the mains hedge trimmer I have,
purchased when I was a lot younger with a huge garden, gets too heavy after
a few minutes, especially when working up a ladder.

I know exactly what you mean and want and will have a word with Julie or
Steve when they come in re the small one Julie uses

Mike



"Spider" wrote in message ...

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay

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Old 27-08-2013, 08:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Well, we've finally ordered a battery-operated Bosch, so it will be
interesting to see how it performs. I need to get some goggles now,
otherwise I won't be able to use it.


Robotic?
I'd have thought you would have been the one to operate it, and it would
have been battery powered,
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Old 27-08-2013, 10:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 27/08/2013 14:21, S Viemeister wrote:
On 8/27/2013 9:19 AM, Spider wrote:

Well, we've finally ordered a battery-operated Bosch, so it will be
interesting to see how it performs. I need to get some goggles now,
otherwise I won't be able to use it.

Which model did you order?




It was the Bosch AHS 54-20 Li with a 36V battery pack.

In fact, it came today! We charged up the battery and gave it a little
test. RG had a go first, then I did. It's very good, and will be
better when I've had a bit of practise. It certainly seems to be well
made and the blade is *sharp*. Between us, we trimmed both small
Euonymous microphylla hedges (approx 40ft long in total) and an almost
6ft yew specimen which I want to topiarise. We both had a bit of
trouble persuading young, whippy shoots to feed themselves into the
blade, rather than bending away, but I think that's part of acquiring
the right technique. In fact, I think a helpful poster suggested
something earlier in this thread, so I shall look back at that to see
what was said.

I can't properly comment on the time it took to charge because I think
it was partially charged when it came. However, it was still going
strong when we finished with it, so no problems.

All in all, I'm very pleased with it. I may even have to plant more
hedges or topiary subjects! Allowing for being seriously sensible and
safety-concious, one might even be inclined to say it's fun. To put all
this into perspective, I'm a 5ft 4" 58yr old blonde woman - if I can do
it, anyone can do it!

It's early days to recommend it without more useage, but I think I may
be recommending in the not too distant future :~).

Thanks everyone for your helpful advice, comments and links. It's all
been worthwhile :~)).

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 28-08-2013, 01:00 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/27/2013 5:54 PM, Spider wrote:
On 27/08/2013 14:21, S Viemeister wrote:
Which model did you order?


It was the Bosch AHS 54-20 Li with a 36V battery pack.


Looks good - but I'll need to save up a bit more!

All in all, I'm very pleased with it. I may even have to plant more
hedges or topiary subjects! Allowing for being seriously sensible and
safety-concious, one might even be inclined to say it's fun. To put all
this into perspective, I'm a 5ft 4" 58yr old blonde woman - if I can do
it, anyone can do it!

I'm a bit older, brunette, and a lot taller - it should be a snap.

It's early days to recommend it without more useage, but I think I may
be recommending in the not too distant future :~).

Thanks everyone for your helpful advice, comments and links. It's all
been worthwhile :~)).

Please report back on it after you've used it for a while - it may
encourage/help justify a splurge.
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Old 28-08-2013, 12:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/28/2013 5:58 AM, Martin wrote:
wrote:
On 8/27/2013 5:54 PM, Spider wrote:
All in all, I'm very pleased with it. I may even have to plant more
hedges or topiary subjects! Allowing for being seriously sensible and
safety-concious, one might even be inclined to say it's fun. To put all
this into perspective, I'm a 5ft 4" 58yr old blonde woman - if I can do
it, anyone can do it!

I'm a bit older, brunette, and a lot taller - it should be a snap.


Bosch trimmers prefer German blondes :-)

I suppose I could dye my hair...


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