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Old 24-08-2013, 12:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay

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Old 24-08-2013, 12:41 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

In article ,
Spider wrote:

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.


Well, I am definitely not a lady and will leave others to judge
whether I am a gentleman :-) But I am very weak in the arms for
a reasonably fit man, and had to give up using a mains electric
one because of the danger. That was a while ago, so it was
probably a similar weight to modern battery ones.

The problem was that holding my arms up and the vibration caused
me to let it drop partly out of control. After it nearly landed
on my legs three times, I gave up and went back to shears and
secateurs. The alternative is, of course, to pay someone to do
it (whether in cash or kind).

It is worth checking that you CAN use such a device for more than
a few minutes with your arms at the height you would need to hold
them. Quite a few women can't.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 24-08-2013, 12:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist. I know it is very lightweight
and I will see what it is and give you the details.

I know what you mean about the heavy machines. Since my second major
operation I am weak in the left arm and the mains hedge trimmer I have,
purchased when I was a lot younger with a huge garden, gets too heavy after
a few minutes, especially when working up a ladder.

I know exactly what you mean and want and will have a word with Julie or
Steve when they come in re the small one Julie uses

Mike



"Spider" wrote in message ...

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay

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Old 24-08-2013, 01:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

In article , says...

In article ,
Spider wrote:

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.


Well, I am definitely not a lady and will leave others to judge
whether I am a gentleman :-) But I am very weak in the arms for
a reasonably fit man, and had to give up using a mains electric
one because of the danger. That was a while ago, so it was
probably a similar weight to modern battery ones.

The problem was that holding my arms up and the vibration caused
me to let it drop partly out of control. After it nearly landed
on my legs three times, I gave up and went back to shears and
secateurs. The alternative is, of course, to pay someone to do
it (whether in cash or kind).

It is worth checking that you CAN use such a device for more than
a few minutes with your arms at the height you would need to hold
them. Quite a few women can't.


I agree. Borrowing or hiring power tools to try before buying, is the
way to go.

I'm 5 ft 2 and use a small electric hedgecutter (15 " blade) to cut 50
m of hawthorn hedge three times a year, which my arm-strength can manage
fine because the hedge is only chest height on me. Takes me a couple of
hours with a break midway.

Yesterday someone gave me a pair of very heavy old 5ft iron gates; he
and John put them on the car roofrack. Back home, nobody but me to help
John get them down. Well, I managed (just) not to drop or scrape my end
down the car but today, don't I wish I hadn't lifted them :-(

Janet.




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Old 24-08-2013, 02:00 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 12:52, 'Mike' wrote:
Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist. I know it is very
lightweight and I will see what it is and give you the details.

I know what you mean about the heavy machines. Since my second major
operation I am weak in the left arm and the mains hedge trimmer I have,
purchased when I was a lot younger with a huge garden, gets too heavy
after a few minutes, especially when working up a ladder.

I know exactly what you mean and want and will have a word with Julie or
Steve when they come in re the small one Julie uses

Mike



"Spider" wrote in message ...

I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.

I have a petrol hedge cutter, but haven't used it much since I got my
Viking strimmer with hedge cutting attachment.
Having the longer reach, and a head you can adjust through a variety of
angles I find it much easier no lifting a weight overhead and holding it
there.
Not knowing how tall your hedges are, it's something to think about, not
saying you get a petrol strimmer but possibly something to think about,
most of the weight is taken on the shoulder strap.
David


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Old 24-08-2013, 03:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On Saturday 24 August 2013 14:00 David Hill wrote in uk.rec.gardening:

I have a petrol hedge cutter, but haven't used it much since I got my
Viking strimmer with hedge cutting attachment.
Having the longer reach, and a head you can adjust through a variety of
angles I find it much easier no lifting a weight overhead and holding it
there.
Not knowing how tall your hedges are, it's something to think about, not
saying you get a petrol strimmer but possibly something to think about,
most of the weight is taken on the shoulder strap.
David


I got one of these a couple of years back:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/7304280.htm

It is "adequate" - in my case it will trim about 50-70 linear feet of 4ft
high hawthorn (both sides and top). Fresh growth only and softer twigs upto
about 1/4"

The supplied 2 battery packs means I can get most of my hedge done in one
session.

It's weak compared to even a lightweight petrol trimmer, but it is:

1) Inexpensive;

2) No cables (a damn liability with a hedge trimmer of all things!)

3) Pretty light to handle.

4) Low hassle if you keep the batteries charged.

Warning - uses old style NiCd battery.

Look at the newer Bosch trimmers with a more modern Li-Ion battery, eg:

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/1019911.htm

Could be better battery wise[1] but you'll need to check some reviews!

[1] I have a Bosch cordless screwdriver that uses the 10.8V LI-Ion battery
and it has been worked to death on a renovation job and the original battery
is still alive (it's a "Bosch Blue" pro tool rather than a "Bosch Green"
consumer tool, but I think the battery packs are the same.

--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://squiddy.blog.dionic.net/

http://www.sensorly.com/ Crowd mapping of 2G/3G/4G mobile signal coverage

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Old 24-08-2013, 03:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 24/08/2013 12:27, Spider wrote:
I am on the verge of acquiring a hedge trimmer, and would be grateful
for advice and comments from other users. It will be used for two small
Euonymous hedges (about 40ft long in total), and a large yew
specimen-cum-topiary. It needs to be cable-free and, since I don't
fancy working with a petrol-powered machine, that means battery-powered.

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.

Advice from anyone would be appreciated, but I am keen to hear from
other ladies on their opinions re bulky handles. Safety is also a
concern and I know some models have two brakes rather than one. How
much is this necessary/essential? How easy are they to use?

Lastly, although I intend to buy two batteries, comments on length of
charge and charging time would be helpful. Also, does charge and
charging time deteriorate over time?

Cost isn't an enormous issue, but I come from Yorkshire so I don't want
to throw money away ;~).

Thank you for your time.


Well, you could always visit a few garden centres and "sheds" (B&Q,
Homebase, etc) and try a few for weight and size, just remembering that
after half an hour's use they will all be at least twice as big and
heavy as the one you started with!

Read as many online reviews as you have time for, noting the comments
and whether or not they make sense and are of any use (positive ones
such as "nice colour", and negative ones such as "I couldn't plug in the
charger because my wall socket was faulty" should be ignored in their
entirety, of course). You might also find info there about how long they
actually lasted in use, not just the manufacturer's figures .

--

Jeff
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Old 24-08-2013, 08:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 12:52:37 +0100, Mike wrote:

Spider my next door neighbour has a battery pack one I think, that is a
battery which is in a pouch around her waist.


That is quite a good tip, a lot of the weight of a battery trimmer
will be in the batteries. The less weight you have on your arms and
having to wave about the better. Nice wide padded belt snug on your
hips will carry a lot more weight than you like on your arms. There
will of course be a cable from the pack to the cutter...

TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old 24-08-2013, 09:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On 8/24/2013 3:56 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters way.

Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.
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Old 24-08-2013, 10:05 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Battery-powered hedge trimmers

On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 16:33:57 -0400, S Viemeister wrote:

TBH I'm not sure what the problem with the cable could be if you
route it well. Assuming cutter trigger handle in right hand, back

to
front under right arm pit, round back of neck, front to back under
left arm pit then to a loop shoved under your belt in the middle

of
yoru back. Slack enough not to restrict any movement and it'll

follow
your arm well and leaving being behind you, out of the cutters

way.

Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.


Which bit half strangling yourself with a cable or cutting the cable?

Anything mains powered outside should be fed via and RCD somewhere.
If you come into contact with mains it'll still hurt, if up a ladder
the jerk reaction might knock you off balance and you'll count half a
dozen cycles or so before it trips but that is far more preferable to
no RCD.

DAMHIKT...

--
Cheers
Dave.





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Old 24-08-2013, 10:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 8/24/2013 5:05 PM, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 16:33:57 -0400, S Viemeister wrote:
Some of us learn these things the hard way...I did survive, though.


Which bit half strangling yourself with a cable or cutting the cable?

Cutting the cable.

Anything mains powered outside should be fed via and RCD somewhere.
If you come into contact with mains it'll still hurt, if up a ladder
the jerk reaction might knock you off balance and you'll count half a
dozen cycles or so before it trips but that is far more preferable to
no RCD.

DAMHIKT...

Fortunately, I was not on a ladder at the time.
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Old 24-08-2013, 10:41 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24/08/2013 12:41, wrote:
In ,
wrote:

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.


Well, I am definitely not a lady and will leave others to judge
whether I am a gentleman :-) But I am very weak in the arms for
a reasonably fit man, and had to give up using a mains electric
one because of the danger. That was a while ago, so it was
probably a similar weight to modern battery ones.

The problem was that holding my arms up and the vibration caused
me to let it drop partly out of control. After it nearly landed
on my legs three times, I gave up and went back to shears and
secateurs. The alternative is, of course, to pay someone to do
it (whether in cash or kind).

It is worth checking that you CAN use such a device for more than
a few minutes with your arms at the height you would need to hold
them. Quite a few women can't.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.




Thanks, Nick, and I'm sure you are a gentleman :~).

I am certainly not intending to chop my legs off, as a legless spider
is, well, not very spidery.

I am stronger in the arms than, perhaps, some ladies, but sometimes have
weak and painful hands due to rheumatism. Naturally, I would not use
the trimmer in those circumstances. I did use a friend's mains powered
one about ten yrs ago and don't remember any problems, but I may ask if
I can have another go with hers purely to judge the weight and tremble
effect as I wobble off into advanced old age;~). No, I'm not that
creaky yet, but not getting any younger, either. I will continue to use
secateurs and geared loppers for my considerable pyracantha hedge
because the flowering and fruiting is so much better when carefully
judged, but for non-flowering material I am prepared to try a power timmer.

Thanks for your comments.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 24-08-2013, 10:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24/08/2013 13:16, Janet wrote:
In , says...

In ,
wrote:

For those who don't already know, I am a lady spider, so I would need to
avoid the heaviest machines, but I don't want a flimsy 'toy' model,
either. Having looked at one or two online, the gripping handles look
huge for a lady's hand, so that might be an issue.


Well, I am definitely not a lady and will leave others to judge
whether I am a gentleman :-) But I am very weak in the arms for
a reasonably fit man, and had to give up using a mains electric
one because of the danger. That was a while ago, so it was
probably a similar weight to modern battery ones.

The problem was that holding my arms up and the vibration caused
me to let it drop partly out of control. After it nearly landed
on my legs three times, I gave up and went back to shears and
secateurs. The alternative is, of course, to pay someone to do
it (whether in cash or kind).

It is worth checking that you CAN use such a device for more than
a few minutes with your arms at the height you would need to hold
them. Quite a few women can't.


I agree. Borrowing or hiring power tools to try before buying, is the
way to go.

I'm 5 ft 2 and use a small electric hedgecutter (15 " blade) to cut 50
m of hawthorn hedge three times a year, which my arm-strength can manage
fine because the hedge is only chest height on me. Takes me a couple of
hours with a break midway.

Yesterday someone gave me a pair of very heavy old 5ft iron gates; he
and John put them on the car roofrack. Back home, nobody but me to help
John get them down. Well, I managed (just) not to drop or scrape my end
down the car but today, don't I wish I hadn't lifted them :-(

Janet.




Thanks, Janet. Yes, I shall certainly try a few out once a get a short
list.

I'm 5ft 4ins, so that helps a bit with taller plants, but the hedge I
want to cut will never be more than 2ft and is currently less. Although
I don't carry its weight(in use), I have used a push mower for years and
that has probably strengthened a few muscles. Naturally, I will take it
very gently when I first use the new machine and may even ask RG to be
on hand in case I need help.

You sound as if you need to soak your aching muscles in a hot bath after
struggling with that gate. Well done, for lifting it down without
pranging the car.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
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Old 25-08-2013, 12:05 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Jake" wrote in message ...




Not that long ago, I saw an advert for a battery hedge trimmer where
the battery was carried in a knapsack contraption on the back with
just a short cable to the tool. This may be an option to consider?


Yup - my grass trimmer (Aldi 29.99 iirc) works along the same lines.
Battery fits nicely in pocket - does about 20mins on full charge.

Regards
Pete


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Old 25-08-2013, 12:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 25/08/2013 11:57, Jake wrote:
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 22:41:39 +0100, wrote:


I am stronger in the arms than, perhaps, some ladies, but sometimes have
weak and painful hands due to rheumatism.


Not that long ago, I saw an advert for a battery hedge trimmer where
the battery was carried in a knapsack contraption on the back with
just a short cable to the tool. This may be an option to consider?

The magazine will be in my rather large "Never chuck it out" pile and
I'd be happy to have a hunt if you can wait a day or three.




That sounds interesting, Jake. Yes, I'd be grateful if you could seek
it out, but don't worry if you can't find it. I could try googling if
your magazine has disappeared. Thank you.



--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay


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