#1   Report Post  
Old 28-09-2013, 07:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2012
Posts: 459
Default Holly Leaves

We have a holly tree in one corner of the garden, and
usually I do not bother with it. This year I need to
tidy up near it, and as there are a lot of dry, hard
and prickly leaves on the floor, I was wonderinging if
it would be worthwhile composting them.Probably stick
them in a plastic sack and store away in a corner for
a few years if it is worth it, if not they'll go on
the bonfire heap!


--
Roger T

700 ft up in Mid-Wales

  #2   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2013, 09:49 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 806
Default Holly Leaves

On 28/09/2013 19:43, Jake wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2013 19:32:26 +0100, Roger Tonkin
wrote:

We have a holly tree in one corner of the garden, and
usually I do not bother with it. This year I need to
tidy up near it, and as there are a lot of dry, hard
and prickly leaves on the floor, I was wonderinging if
it would be worthwhile composting them.Probably stick
them in a plastic sack and store away in a corner for
a few years if it is worth it, if not they'll go on
the bonfire heap!


I've found that holly leaves take several years to break down and now
consign them to the local tip where, presumably, the hotter composting
process will achieve something.


Am I right in thinking that leaf mould isn't very nutritious anyway?
Probably improves soil structure though?
  #3   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2013, 09:50 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2013
Posts: 767
Default Holly Leaves

In article ,
stuart noble wrote:
On 28/09/2013 19:43, Jake wrote:
On Sat, 28 Sep 2013 19:32:26 +0100, Roger Tonkin
wrote:

We have a holly tree in one corner of the garden, and
usually I do not bother with it. This year I need to
tidy up near it, and as there are a lot of dry, hard
and prickly leaves on the floor, I was wonderinging if
it would be worthwhile composting them.Probably stick
them in a plastic sack and store away in a corner for
a few years if it is worth it, if not they'll go on
the bonfire heap!


I've found that holly leaves take several years to break down and now
consign them to the local tip where, presumably, the hotter composting
process will achieve something.


Am I right in thinking that leaf mould isn't very nutritious anyway?
Probably improves soil structure though?


Yes.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2013, 02:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 432
Default Holly Leaves

On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 09:49:33 +0100, stuart noble wrote:


Am I right in thinking that leaf mould isn't very nutritious anyway?
Probably improves soil structure though?


Trees may not have brains but they are not stupid. They re-absorb every
last bit of 'goodness' from leaves before they drop them. What's left is
mostly complex carbohydrates (I believe) which fungi break down into
'humus', a key component of the structure of topsoils.
  #5   Report Post  
Old 29-09-2013, 06:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,166
Default Holly Leaves

On 29/09/2013 14:56, Derek Turner wrote:
On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 09:49:33 +0100, stuart noble wrote:


Am I right in thinking that leaf mould isn't very nutritious anyway?
Probably improves soil structure though?


Trees may not have brains but they are not stupid. They re-absorb every
last bit of 'goodness' from leaves before they drop them. What's left is
mostly complex carbohydrates (I believe) which fungi break down into
'humus', a key component of the structure of topsoils.


Most sources note that in fallen leaves the carbon:nitrogen ratio is
about 30:1. That appears to be the best ratio for recycling and
nutrient retention. If it's less than 30:1, the nitrogen is in excess
and is lost as ammonia. If it's more than 30:1, then the resulting
humus will be deficient in nitrogen.

Some plants are more efficient than others at reabsorbing carbon and
nitrogen from leaves, but if you think about it, there must be some
nitrogen returned to the soil or plants would not be able to grow (those
that can use nitrogen fixed by micro-organisms are in the minority).

--

Jeff


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spots on Holly leaves Julian200 United Kingdom 0 01-03-2011 09:58 AM
Holly (Ilex) leaves turning yellow and losing spines suzeyblue Gardening 3 21-06-2009 01:45 AM
Holly leaves turning yellow Al[_4_] United Kingdom 1 10-05-2009 10:58 PM
Yaupon Holly (and other holly questions) Susan Hogarth North Carolina 5 11-01-2005 05:16 PM
Leaves, leaves and yet more leaves! John Towill United Kingdom 12 01-11-2003 12:43 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017