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Old 25-10-2013, 11:53 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?


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Old 25-10-2013, 12:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 11:53:51 +0100, yttiw said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?


Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Old 25-10-2013, 12:30 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 11:13:33 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 11:53:51 +0100, yttiw said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?


Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?


Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.

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Old 25-10-2013, 12:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 12:30:47 +0100, yttiw said:

On 2013-10-25 11:13:33 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 11:53:51 +0100, yttiw said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?


Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?


Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.


The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I mention
that because sometimes things flower out of season if they're dying.
It's as if they put in one last effort at propagating themselves. We
had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered in January (iirc) and promptly
died. It's supposed to flower in summer!
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Old 25-10-2013, 12:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 11:36:21 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 12:30:47 +0100, yttiw said:

On 2013-10-25 11:13:33 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 11:53:51 +0100, yttiw said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?


Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.


The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I mention
that because sometimes things flower out of season if they're dying.
It's as if they put in one last effort at propagating themselves. We
had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered in January (iirc) and promptly
died. It's supposed to flower in summer!


With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading his
conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the sun is
relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that grows
above about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my cactus
always seem to do that.




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Old 25-10-2013, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacha[_11_] View Post
Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?
I've never noticed my Arbutus attracting butterflies. Perhaps it isn't usually so mild so long as to keep the butterflies alive as it has been this year. Arbutus are very tolerant of pruning (best done in a frost free period), so no need to kill it off for getting too big, you can just control it.

My Hoheria flowers in midsummer - July into early August - but there are several kinds, mine is the common hybrid Amlwch Glory.

Burncoose let you search by flowering month, though its a bit misleading.
Plants Flowering in October - Page 1 - Burncoose Nurseries - plants by mail order direct to you - Camellia, Magnolia and Rhododendron Specialists
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Old 25-10-2013, 07:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 11:45:02 +0000, yttiw said:

On 2013-10-25 11:36:21 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 12:30:47 +0100, yttiw said:

On 2013-10-25 11:13:33 +0000, Sacha said:

On 2013-10-25 11:53:51 +0100, yttiw said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?

Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.


The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I mention
that because sometimes things flower out of season if they're dying.
It's as if they put in one last effort at propagating themselves. We
had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered in January (iirc) and promptly
died. It's supposed to flower in summer!


With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading his
conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the sun is
relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that grows
above about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my cactus
always seem to do that.


Comfort yourself with the thought that these things happen to all of
us! Anyway, perhaps your cacti are monocarpic and will bequeath you
some of their baby selves!


--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon

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Old 25-10-2013, 10:50 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree


"sacha" wrote in message
...

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one
in his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a
couple of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant
it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by
its demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had
dark-ish waxy leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any
clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is
a Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an
autumnal one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?

Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.

The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I mention
that because sometimes things flower out of season if they're dying.
It's as if they put in one last effort at propagating themselves. We
had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered in January (iirc) and promptly
died. It's supposed to flower in summer!


With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading his
conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the sun is
relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that grows above
about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my cactus
always seem to do that.


Comfort yourself with the thought that these things happen to all of us!
Anyway, perhaps your cacti are monocarpic and will bequeath you some of
their baby selves!


--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon


What about Eleagnus x ebingii ours is in full flower now and is attracting
butterflies,

--
Charlie, Gardening in Cornwall
Holders of National Collections of Clematis viticella
and Lapageria rosea cvs
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk

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Old 26-10-2013, 12:15 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-25 22:50:25 +0100, Charlie Pridham said:

"sacha" wrote in message
...

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly
flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild,
sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus,
that is until one February day the following spring a man with a
chain-saw arrived and cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The
neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of
tree it was, and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis. But
where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering period
and it would help to know the flower colour. The other possibility is a
Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering tree than an autumnal
one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?

Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't ever
remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was evergreen.
I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was quite a distance
away. I would not have known that it was flowering except for suddenly
noticing the butterflies, so I guess the flowers must have been
relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry Tree
rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.

The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I mention
that because sometimes things flower out of season if they're dying.
It's as if they put in one last effort at propagating themselves. We
had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered in January (iirc) and promptly
died. It's supposed to flower in summer!

With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading his
conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the sun is
relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that grows
above about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my cactus
always seem to do that.


Comfort yourself with the thought that these things happen to all of
us! Anyway, perhaps your cacti are monocarpic and will bequeath you
some of their baby selves!


--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon


What about Eleagnus x ebingii ours is in full flower now and is
attracting butterflies,


Oh yes, a very definite could be.
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Old 26-10-2013, 10:29 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 25/10/13 11:53, yttiw wrote:
I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly flowered,
and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild, sunny days.
As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus, that is until
one February day the following spring a man with a chain-saw arrived and
cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The neighbour
is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of tree it was,
and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any
clues?


It might be worth looking for any photos that you might have taken that
show the tree, even if it was in the background - it might show the
shape and trunk/branch structure at the very least. It's amazing how
often photos taken for one reason turn out to be useful for something else.

If you have such a photo, upload it to say Dropbox or another online
service and post the url here.


--
John Milner


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Old 26-10-2013, 10:30 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 26/10/2013 00:15, Sacha wrote:
On 2013-10-25 22:50:25 +0100, Charlie Pridham said:

"sacha" wrote in message
...

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree
that flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had
one in his garden for a short period. During late October it
suddenly flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in
quantity on mild, sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was
an unexpected bonus, that is until one February day the
following spring a man with a chain-saw arrived and cut the
entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a
couple of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own
garden. The neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no
idea what species of tree it was, and it was there when he moved
in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall
by its demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had
dark-ish waxy leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone
provide any clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis.
But where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering
period and it would help to know the flower colour. The other
possibility is a Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering
tree than an autumnal one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?

Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't
ever remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was
evergreen. I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was
quite a distance away. I would not have known that it was
flowering except for suddenly noticing the butterflies, so I guess
the flowers must have been relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry
Tree rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.

The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I
mention that because sometimes things flower out of season if
they're dying. It's as if they put in one last effort at
propagating themselves. We had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered
in January (iirc) and promptly died. It's supposed to flower in
summer!

With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading
his conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the
sun is relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that
grows above about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my
cactus always seem to do that.

Comfort yourself with the thought that these things happen to all of
us! Anyway, perhaps your cacti are monocarpic and will bequeath you
some of their baby selves!


--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon


What about Eleagnus x ebingii ours is in full flower now and is
attracting butterflies,


Oh yes, a very definite could be.


It's that time of year when I have my head buried in Eleagnus taking in
all that wonderful scent.
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Old 26-10-2013, 10:33 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Late Autumn flowering tree

On 2013-10-26 10:30:26 +0100, David Hill said:

On 26/10/2013 00:15, Sacha wrote:
On 2013-10-25 22:50:25 +0100, Charlie Pridham said:

"sacha" wrote in message
...

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree
that flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had
one in his garden for a short period. During late October it
suddenly flowered, and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in
quantity on mild, sunny days. As a butterfly enthusiast this was
an unexpected bonus, that is until one February day the
following spring a man with a chain-saw arrived and cut the
entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a
couple of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own
garden. The neighbour is not a gardener and therefore has no
idea what species of tree it was, and it was there when he moved
in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall
by its demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had
dark-ish waxy leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone
provide any clues?

Taking a stab in the dark, try Arbutus unedo or Myrtus communis.
But where you live will make a bit of difference to the flowering
period and it would help to know the flower colour. The other
possibility is a Hoheria but that's more a late summer flowering
tree than an autumnal one. And was this one evergreen or deciduous?

Thanks very much Sacha.

I am in Somerset, and so quite mild - relatively speaking. I can't
ever remember the tree being without leaves, so presumably it was
evergreen. I cannot recall the flower colour, as the tree was
quite a distance away. I would not have known that it was
flowering except for suddenly noticing the butterflies, so I guess
the flowers must have been relatively small.

I think therefore it is more likely to have been the Strawberry
Tree rather than the Myrtle, and now I have some names to assist me.

Thanks again.

The Myrtle flowers aren't very large but are noticeable because the
trees tend to be absolutely covered. Ours are flowering now for the
second time. The thing with myrtles is that they tend to seed
themselves around quite a lot so your neighbour would probably have
noticed that! But I'm just wondering why he had it cut down? I
mention that because sometimes things flower out of season if
they're dying. It's as if they put in one last effort at
propagating themselves. We had a Eucryphia which suddenly flowered
in January (iirc) and promptly died. It's supposed to flower in
summer!

With hindsight, I think he had it cut down because it was shading
his conservatory, especially in the Autumn and early Spring when the
sun is relatively low in the sky. He seems not to like anything that
grows above about 8 feet tall.

Don't remind me of plants flowering immediately before dying; my
cactus always seem to do that.

Comfort yourself with the thought that these things happen to all of
us! Anyway, perhaps your cacti are monocarpic and will bequeath you
some of their baby selves!


--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon


What about Eleagnus x ebingii ours is in full flower now and is
attracting butterflies,


Oh yes, a very definite could be.


It's that time of year when I have my head buried in Eleagnus taking in
all that wonderful scent.


It's fabulous and could very well be the answer and the flowers are
small and not highly visible from a distance.
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk

  #13   Report Post  
Old 26-10-2013, 12:14 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,520
Default Late Autumn flowering tree


"John Milner" wrote in message
...
On 25/10/13 11:53, yttiw wrote:
I was wondering if anyone could help me with a species of tree that
flowers from mid-October?

I doubt that it would be a native species, but my neighbour had one in
his garden for a short period. During late October it suddenly flowered,
and attracted Red Admiral butterflies in quantity on mild, sunny days.
As a butterfly enthusiast this was an unexpected bonus, that is until
one February day the following spring a man with a chain-saw arrived and
cut the entire tree down.

Had I have known this was planned, I could have asked to take a couple
of cuttings and tried to propogate them for my own garden. The neighbour
is not a gardener and therefore has no idea what species of tree it was,
and it was there when he moved in, so he did not plant it.

Sadly, I have no details except that it was about 12-15 ft tall by its
demise, and seemed to grow relatively slowly, plus it had dark-ish waxy
leaves.

A very inadequate description, I'm afraid, but can anyone provide any
clues?


It might be worth looking for any photos that you might have taken that
show the tree, even if it was in the background - it might show the shape
and trunk/branch structure at the very least. It's amazing how often
photos taken for one reason turn out to be useful for something else.

If you have such a photo, upload it to say Dropbox or another online
service and post the url here.


--
John Milner


Also Google maps street view

--
Charlie, Gardening in Cornwall
Holders of National Collections of Clematis viticella
and Lapageria rosea cvs
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk



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