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Old 04-01-2014, 10:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Here in Leics.
The problem is, that to get out of here down to the village is under a
railway bridge and it floods.
Over Christmas it was impassable for 5 days so I emailed my local
councillor. By the next day it was clear. Coincidence?
Anyway, it was up again today, and someone had lost their bumper in a
collision (probably deciding not to do it and reversing into a car behind)
So, I drove there (going to the library) and then left my car and walked the
rest of the way. I know the flood under the bridge looks innocuous, but
there is a horrible dip in the road under it and then your car is dead in
the water.

Us, up here know about the bridge, it looks like you can get your car
through, but you can't.
I have a wonderful pic of someone who tried. had to get out of his sunroof
and get the fire brigade.

On the way back from the library I removed the car debris from the road, as
the cars who were trying to get through the flood were just ignoring it and
running over it. To make it worse.



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Old 05-01-2014, 10:24 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 04/01/2014 22:31, Christina Websell wrote:
Here in Leics.
The problem is, that to get out of here down to the village is under a
railway bridge and it floods.
Over Christmas it was impassable for 5 days so I emailed my local
councillor. By the next day it was clear. Coincidence?
Anyway, it was up again today, and someone had lost their bumper in a
collision (probably deciding not to do it and reversing into a car behind)
So, I drove there (going to the library) and then left my car and walked the
rest of the way. I know the flood under the bridge looks innocuous, but
there is a horrible dip in the road under it and then your car is dead in
the water.

Us, up here know about the bridge, it looks like you can get your car
through, but you can't.
I have a wonderful pic of someone who tried. had to get out of his sunroof
and get the fire brigade.

On the way back from the library I removed the car debris from the road, as
the cars who were trying to get through the flood were just ignoring it and
running over it. To make it worse.




I wonder how they are managing in Holland where there is more water? I
bet they're more efficient at clearing their dykes and drainage channels
than us.

Walking around our countryside all the ditches are full of debris from
the last winds and probably wont get cleared ever.

I remember the days of Roadmen and policemen who walked the beat.
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Old 05-01-2014, 12:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 12:06:26 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 10:24:24 +0000, Saxman
wrote:

On 04/01/2014 22:31, Christina Websell wrote:
Here in Leics.
The problem is, that to get out of here down to the village is under a
railway bridge and it floods.
Over Christmas it was impassable for 5 days so I emailed my local
councillor. By the next day it was clear. Coincidence?
Anyway, it was up again today, and someone had lost their bumper in a
collision (probably deciding not to do it and reversing into a car behind)
So, I drove there (going to the library) and then left my car and walked the
rest of the way. I know the flood under the bridge looks innocuous, but
there is a horrible dip in the road under it and then your car is dead in
the water.

Us, up here know about the bridge, it looks like you can get your car
through, but you can't.
I have a wonderful pic of someone who tried. had to get out of his sunroof
and get the fire brigade.

On the way back from the library I removed the car debris from the road, as
the cars who were trying to get through the flood were just ignoring it and
running over it. To make it worse.




I wonder how they are managing in Holland where there is more water? I
bet they're more efficient at clearing their dykes and drainage channels
than us.


The Dutch spend billions on flood defences. As a result they pay far more in
taxes than in UK.


Walking around our countryside all the ditches are full of debris from
the last winds and probably wont get cleared ever.

I remember the days of Roadmen and policemen who walked the beat.


In the Netherlands you have to build houses on a flood plain, because
that's all there is. In the UK it is voluntary, but the builders do it
just the same and blame the government when they get flooded. That's
the British way!
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 04/01/2014 22:31, Christina Websell wrote:
Here in Leics.
The problem is, that to get out of here down to the village is under a
railway bridge and it floods.


I'm having difficulty believing it, but according to the MetOffice I
only got about 75% of the average December rainfall here. (The weather's
been more windy than torrential, but I still would have thought that it
would have broken the average.) Interpolating between the contours
Leicestershire got about 85% of its (lower) average.

Spurn Head was the most unseasonably dry location, with less than a
third of the average monthly rainfall. The bits with over 200% of
average rainfall are a stretch of the southeast between Purkbeck and
Thanet, and a belt up the centre of the country from the Lake District
to Inverness and Ullapool (plus Applecross, and South Uist and Benbecula)

Over Christmas it was impassable for 5 days so I emailed my local
councillor. By the next day it was clear. Coincidence?
Anyway, it was up again today, and someone had lost their bumper in a
collision (probably deciding not to do it and reversing into a car behind)
So, I drove there (going to the library) and then left my car and walked the
rest of the way. I know the flood under the bridge looks innocuous, but
there is a horrible dip in the road under it and then your car is dead in
the water.

Us, up here know about the bridge, it looks like you can get your car
through, but you can't.
I have a wonderful pic of someone who tried. had to get out of his sunroof
and get the fire brigade.

On the way back from the library I removed the car debris from the road, as
the cars who were trying to get through the flood were just ignoring it and
running over it. To make it worse.



--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:14 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 14:16:42 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 12:48:06 +0000, AnotherJohn wrote:

On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 12:06:26 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 10:24:24 +0000, Saxman
wrote:

On 04/01/2014 22:31, Christina Websell wrote:
Here in Leics.
The problem is, that to get out of here down to the village is under a
railway bridge and it floods.
Over Christmas it was impassable for 5 days so I emailed my local
councillor. By the next day it was clear. Coincidence?
Anyway, it was up again today, and someone had lost their bumper in a
collision (probably deciding not to do it and reversing into a car behind)
So, I drove there (going to the library) and then left my car and walked the
rest of the way. I know the flood under the bridge looks innocuous, but
there is a horrible dip in the road under it and then your car is dead in
the water.

Us, up here know about the bridge, it looks like you can get your car
through, but you can't.
I have a wonderful pic of someone who tried. had to get out of his sunroof
and get the fire brigade.

On the way back from the library I removed the car debris from the road, as
the cars who were trying to get through the flood were just ignoring it and
running over it. To make it worse.




I wonder how they are managing in Holland where there is more water? I
bet they're more efficient at clearing their dykes and drainage channels
than us.

The Dutch spend billions on flood defences. As a result they pay far more in
taxes than in UK.


Walking around our countryside all the ditches are full of debris from
the last winds and probably wont get cleared ever.

I remember the days of Roadmen and policemen who walked the beat.


In the Netherlands you have to build houses on a flood plain, because
that's all there is. In the UK it is voluntary, but the builders do it
just the same and blame the government when they get flooded.


because local government gave planning permission to build on a flood plain.

Developers frequently force through planning permissions against
council officers' expert advice, because cash-strapped councils cannot
afford the cost of fighting appeals.

That's
the British way!


Not all of the Netherlands is at or below sea level.

What sort of idiot buys a house located on a UK flood plain or within a mile of
a crumbling cliff?

Properties with a riverside frontage sell at a premium. Have a look at
house prices by the Thames.
Clifftop views are so attractive!




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Old 06-01-2014, 11:25 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:

Properties with a riverside frontage sell at a premium. Have a look at
house prices by the Thames.
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not a problem for those living there. They just move into their second
homes.
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Old 06-01-2014, 02:34 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 06/01/2014 12:03, Martin wrote:
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:25:16 +0000, Saxman
wrote:

On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:

Properties with a riverside frontage sell at a premium. Have a look at
house prices by the Thames.
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not a problem for those living there. They just move into their second
homes.


unless they have been flattened by a hurricane

Could it be time for getting a houseboat.
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Old 06-01-2014, 03:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not if you are standing surveying your house on the foreshore 50 foot
down

I would NEVER buy on a flood plain or cliff, don't care about the
wonderful views. To my mind I'd rather see fields and stuff than a
boring horizon and just water. (lived in Brighton for 4 years, not
impressed)

I like addresses that include Hill or High or something similar

--
Janet Tweedy
South Buckinghamshire

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Old 06-01-2014, 03:43 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 06/01/2014 14:34, David Hill wrote:
On 06/01/2014 12:03, Martin wrote:
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:25:16 +0000, Saxman
wrote:

On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:

Properties with a riverside frontage sell at a premium. Have a look at
house prices by the Thames.
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not a problem for those living there. They just move into their second
homes.


unless they have been flattened by a hurricane

Could it be time for getting a houseboat.



Years ago when I was having problems with Planning I wondered what would
be the situation if I dug out a long deep "Trench" large enough to float
a houseboat on.
As it wouldn't be a building or on the ground, would I need planning
permission, or a permit from the river authorities?

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Old 06-01-2014, 04:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 2014-01-06 15:13:55 +0000, Janet Tweedy said:

On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not if you are standing surveying your house on the foreshore 50 foot down

I would NEVER buy on a flood plain or cliff, don't care about the
wonderful views. To my mind I'd rather see fields and stuff than a
boring horizon and just water. (lived in Brighton for 4 years, not
impressed)

I like addresses that include Hill or High or something similar


Depends what the cliff is made of, though. My brother and sil have a
house on a clifftop in Guernsey. The views are absolutely stunning and
the cliff is made of good old solid granite and isn't going anywhere.
Otoh, the woman who bought a house - unseen! - on the edge of a cliff
near Babbacombe, Devon really did make a very huge and expensive
mistake. The previous owners must be giving thanks!
http://www.thisiscornwall.co.uk/Goin...#axzz2pdROe2RM

--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk



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Old 06-01-2014, 04:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 15:13:55 +0000, Janet Tweedy wrote:

Clifftop views are so attractive!


I would NEVER buy on a flood plain or cliff, don't care about the
wonderful views.


Flood plain I'd agree with cliff, well it would depend on what the
cliff is made of. Aluvial deposits no way, nice bit of solid granite
is another matter.

To my mind I'd rather see fields and stuff than a boring horizon and
just water.


Both always change and these days with:

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/

You would know where the shipping is going to.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old 06-01-2014, 04:20 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"David Hill" wrote in message ...

On 06/01/2014 14:34, David Hill wrote:
On 06/01/2014 12:03, Martin wrote:
On Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:25:16 +0000, Saxman
wrote:

On 06/01/2014 11:14, AnotherJohn wrote:

Properties with a riverside frontage sell at a premium. Have a look at
house prices by the Thames.
Clifftop views are so attractive!



Not a problem for those living there. They just move into their second
homes.


unless they have been flattened by a hurricane

Could it be time for getting a houseboat.



Years ago when I was having problems with Planning I wondered what would
be the situation if I dug out a long deep "Trench" large enough to float
a houseboat on.
As it wouldn't be a building or on the ground, would I need planning
permission, or a permit from the river authorities?

================================================== =====

Change of use to 'Commercial use and a Marina' then planning permission to
moor a vessel

If they don't get you one way thy will the other, but I have put that 'rule'
to my advantage :-)

Mike


---------------------------------------------------------------
www.friendsofshanklintheatre.co.uk
www.hmscollingwoodassociation.com
www.rneba.org.uk
www.nsrafa.org

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Old 06-01-2014, 07:03 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Chris Hogg" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 05 Jan 2014 13:52:32 +0000, Stewart Robert Hinsley
wrote:

I'm having difficulty believing it, but according to the MetOffice I
only got about 75% of the average December rainfall here. (The weather's
been more windy than torrential, but I still would have thought that it
would have broken the average.) Interpolating between the contours
Leicestershire got about 85% of its (lower) average.


We had 74% of our local long term average here in December, although
the very end was a bit wet, so I can believe it.

If we get a lot of rain in a few hours (we have) the bridge floods. If I
had a 4x4 I could make a lot of money towing the cars out that have died in
the middle of it for 15 a time.
It looks like you can get through it but if the water is near to overflowing
on to the footway, ordinary cars can't.
It has a dip in the road. It was closed off recently because of the
"triers" who got their cars stuck under there and had to call the police.




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Old 06-01-2014, 09:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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In message , Stewart Robert Hinsley
writes
I'm having difficulty believing it, but according to the MetOffice I
only got about 75% of the average December rainfall here. (The
weather's been more windy than torrential, but I still would have
thought that it would have broken the average.) Interpolating between
the contours Leicestershire got about 85% of its (lower) average.

We've had less than average here too (Cheshire) but it has mostly cone
in the last couple of weeks. We've been recording rain fall for the last
17 years and after 3 or4 year of increasing rain the trend has been
generally downwards although last year was a bit wetter than 2012
--
bert
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Old 07-01-2014, 10:15 AM
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Note that the EA now have two sets of flood maps. To the map showing risk of flooding from rivers and other waterways, they've now added a map showing the risk of flooding from flash floods and surface run-off. It's impressively comprehensive, at least in my area.
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