Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2015, 03:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2015
Posts: 38
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

Am trying to get into shape a garden containing some quite hard (but
seemingly good) top soil, but it has quite a lot of lumps of clay in it
(dug up from the clay bed from about a foot below) some time in the past.

I have some ready access to a endless supply of rotted leaf mold heaped
up from somewhere nearby and similarly a lot of old lawn grass cuttings.

With the intention of growing just flowers and shrubs (no veggies) in
the garden, should i try to remove all the lumps of clay ( a lot of them
are only a couple of cm across) ?

Also what quantities/ratios of mold and or grass cuttings should i mix
in, if you even think this is an advisable thing to do.

Many thanks for any advice.



  #2   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2015, 03:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2013
Posts: 767
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

In article ,
john west wrote:
Am trying to get into shape a garden containing some quite hard (but
seemingly good) top soil, but it has quite a lot of lumps of clay in it
(dug up from the clay bed from about a foot below) some time in the past.

I have some ready access to a endless supply of rotted leaf mold heaped
up from somewhere nearby and similarly a lot of old lawn grass cuttings.

With the intention of growing just flowers and shrubs (no veggies) in
the garden, should i try to remove all the lumps of clay ( a lot of them
are only a couple of cm across) ?


No. Break them up, if you have the energy, but clay holds nutrients
and soils without it are rarely fertile.

Also what quantities/ratios of mold and or grass cuttings should i mix
in, if you even think this is an advisable thing to do.


As much as you have the energy for :-)


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #3   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2015, 04:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 310
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

john west wrote:

Am trying to get into shape a garden containing some quite hard (but
seemingly good) top soil, but it has quite a lot of lumps of clay in it
(dug up from the clay bed from about a foot below) some time in the past.

I have some ready access to a endless supply of rotted leaf mold heaped
up from somewhere nearby and similarly a lot of old lawn grass cuttings.

With the intention of growing just flowers and shrubs (no veggies) in
the garden, should i try to remove all the lumps of clay ( a lot of them
are only a couple of cm across) ?


Whilst you are at it, gypsum is recommended as a soil improver
where clay is present, but appears to be sold in garden centres
as a proprietary product costing over 6 for 2.5 kg.

http://www.capitalgardens.co.uk/clay...er-p-6321.html

On the other hand, I picked up a 25 kg bag of multi-finish
plaster for under 5, and AFAIK this is essentially the same
material. It worked very well.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2015, 06:08 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 310
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

Chris Hogg wrote:

On Tue, 26 May 2015 16:02:15 +0100, Chris J Dixon
wrote:


On the other hand, I picked up a 25 kg bag of multi-finish
plaster for under 5, and AFAIK this is essentially the same
material. It worked very well.


Just be aware that builders plaster is not the same as it used to be
many years ago, when it was derived from mined gypsum. These days most
of it is the by-product of flue gas desulphurisation at big coal-fired
power stations, where the flue gases are scrubbed with lime. As the
lime is use up, the efficiency of the scrubbing process drops away,
and the spent lime, now mostly gypsum, is sold off for building use.
But it still contains a little residual lime, so whereas in the past,
gypsum could be used around lime-hating ericaceous plants such as
rhododendrons, camellias and heathers to improve and even acidify the
soil (pure gypsum being mildly acidic), it would not be a good idea
these days.

Still OK as a 'clay-breaker' though.


I take your point. As it happens, I live in an area that features
both methods of production, and have even seen it being mined.
However, which one makes it into the local shops is anybody's
guess.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
  #5   Report Post  
Old 26-05-2015, 06:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 806
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

On 26/05/2015 16:02, Chris J Dixon wrote:
john west wrote:

Am trying to get into shape a garden containing some quite hard (but
seemingly good) top soil, but it has quite a lot of lumps of clay in it
(dug up from the clay bed from about a foot below) some time in the past.

I have some ready access to a endless supply of rotted leaf mold heaped
up from somewhere nearby and similarly a lot of old lawn grass cuttings.

With the intention of growing just flowers and shrubs (no veggies) in
the garden, should i try to remove all the lumps of clay ( a lot of them
are only a couple of cm across) ?


Whilst you are at it, gypsum is recommended as a soil improver
where clay is present, but appears to be sold in garden centres
as a proprietary product costing over 6 for 2.5 kg.

http://www.capitalgardens.co.uk/clay...er-p-6321.html

On the other hand, I picked up a 25 kg bag of multi-finish
plaster for under 5, and AFAIK this is essentially the same
material. It worked very well.

Chris


I don't think gypsum sets when mixed with water, but probably not
important in the long term


  #6   Report Post  
Old 27-05-2015, 08:58 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 806
Default Advice on using leaf mold and grass clippings

On 26/05/2015 19:46, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 26 May 2015 18:32:52 +0100, stuart noble
wrote:

On 26/05/2015 16:02, Chris J Dixon wrote:
john west wrote:

Am trying to get into shape a garden containing some quite hard (but
seemingly good) top soil, but it has quite a lot of lumps of clay in it
(dug up from the clay bed from about a foot below) some time in the past.

I have some ready access to a endless supply of rotted leaf mold heaped
up from somewhere nearby and similarly a lot of old lawn grass cuttings.

With the intention of growing just flowers and shrubs (no veggies) in
the garden, should i try to remove all the lumps of clay ( a lot of them
are only a couple of cm across) ?

Whilst you are at it, gypsum is recommended as a soil improver
where clay is present, but appears to be sold in garden centres
as a proprietary product costing over 6 for 2.5 kg.

http://www.capitalgardens.co.uk/clay...er-p-6321.html

On the other hand, I picked up a 25 kg bag of multi-finish
plaster for under 5, and AFAIK this is essentially the same
material. It worked very well.

Chris


I don't think gypsum sets when mixed with water, but probably not
important in the long term


The setting action of plaster has nothing to do with it's action as a
clay-breaker. It's the calcium that does it, gypsum and plaster being
slightly soluble (~0.2% in water, IIRC). The calcium causes the
microscopic flat platy clay particles to clump together (flocculate)
in a more open structure (often described as an edge-to-face
house-of-cards structure, compared to the face-to-face pack-of-cards
structure it was before) which makes the bulk clay easier to manage.

Lime can be used to achieve the same result, but with an accompanying
increase in pH which may not be desirable.


Ah, interesting!



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Grass/leaf clippings Dioclese Gardening 8 23-01-2009 01:38 PM
Newbie & a question about leaf mold?? NanD1065 Gardening 4 14-05-2005 11:43 PM
Tomato problems: potato leaf vs, regular leaf (cut leaf?) Joanne Edible Gardening 7 17-03-2005 08:53 PM
Will using paper for mulch cause mold? Joseph A. Zupko Edible Gardening 10 10-04-2004 03:32 PM
leaf mold and compost mmarteen Gardening 9 07-02-2003 04:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017