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Old 30-03-2017, 05:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q. Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

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Old 30-03-2017, 06:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q. Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?


Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.


When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But for permanent plants in the garden?!

--
I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist, two plumbers, and a bartender.
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Old 30-03-2017, 06:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?


Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.


When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.
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Old 30-03-2017, 06:58 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:52:12 +0100, David wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.


When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.


They have holes in the bottom just like the plastic ones. Anyway you can buy frost proof ones.

--
I dialled one of those 900 numbers to get some financial advice. They advised me not to dial 900 numbers.
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Old 30-03-2017, 08:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On 30/03/2017 18:58, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:52:12 +0100, David
wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.

When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.


They have holes in the bottom just like the plastic ones. Anyway you
can buy frost proof ones.

Most of them have just one hole in the base, and I have seen the "Frost
proof" pots in pieces after a winter outside in a garden centre


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Old 30-03-2017, 08:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 20:04:58 +0100, David wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:58, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:52:12 +0100, David
wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.

When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.


They have holes in the bottom just like the plastic ones. Anyway you
can buy frost proof ones.

Most of them have just one hole in the base,


Enough to drain just as fast.

and I have seen the "Frost
proof" pots in pieces after a winter outside in a garden centre


Mine don't, and that's in Scotland. Probably the garden centre ones get physical abuse.

I got loads of stuff cheap when there was a gailforce wind and the staff were running around panicking trying to salvage things, made worse by a powercut causing their computers to go down. They began bartering.

--
What's the ultimate in rejection?
Having a wank and your hand goes to sleep!
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Old 31-03-2017, 01:46 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

In article , says...

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:52:12 +0100, David wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.

When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.


They have holes in the bottom just like the plastic ones. Anyway you can buy frost proof ones.


They are frost resistant, not frost proof.
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Old 31-03-2017, 08:56 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On 30/03/2017 17:04, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their gardens?
Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q. Haven't
these people heard of glazed clay?


Oh no! Not here as well.

Mike
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Old 31-03-2017, 12:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow wrote:

In article , says...

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:52:12 +0100, David wrote:

On 30/03/2017 18:35, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 18:17:28 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:04:04 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their
gardens? Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q.
Haven't these people heard of glazed clay?

Depends. I save all my flowerpots that contained plants bought at
garden centres as they're useful for potting-on plants that are being
raised prior to them being planted in the garden.

Larger plastic planters are lighter and cheaper than the fancy glazed
pottery ones, but I will admit I do prefer the latter for permanent
display e.g. on the patio or in the conservatory.

When they're full of earth, both are about the same weight.

If you're just raising loads in a greenhouse, sure, use plastic. But
for permanent plants in the garden?!

Many of the glazed pots have lousy drainage so break in heavy frost, the
answer is to stand your plant in it's plastic pot inside your glazed
container.


They have holes in the bottom just like the plastic ones. Anyway you can buy frost proof ones.


They are frost resistant, not frost proof.


Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water resistant". It's waterproof.

--
When Mike got arrested, the police told him, "Anything you say will be held against you."
Mike smiled and simply replied, "Jessica Simpson's boobs."
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Old 31-03-2017, 12:28 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:56:42 +0100, Muddymike wrote:

On 30/03/2017 17:04, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
What is it with people using tacky plastic flowerpots in their gardens?
Plastic pots are what you take the plant home in from B&Q. Haven't
these people heard of glazed clay?


Oh no! Not here as well.


Aswell as?

--
Do you know how to get an 88 year old woman to say "BITCH!"?
You get a 72 year old woman to yell "BINGO!"


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Old 31-03-2017, 02:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

In article ,
James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow wrote:

They are frost resistant, not frost proof.


Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water
resistant". It's waterproof.


Oh, really? Are you sure that the m doesn't stand for milliseconds,
and it is the time it can be underwater before it starts to let in
water? Everyone I know of who has had an accident that tested the
waterproofness seriously has found that it wasn't ....


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 31-03-2017, 02:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:35:26 +0100, Nick Maclaren wrote:

In article ,
James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow wrote:

They are frost resistant, not frost proof.


Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water
resistant". It's waterproof.


Oh, really? Are you sure that the m doesn't stand for milliseconds,
and it is the time it can be underwater before it starts to let in
water? Everyone I know of who has had an accident that tested the
waterproofness seriously has found that it wasn't ....


Bullshit. Myself and millions of others swim with their watches on.

--
It has recently been discovered that research causes cancer in rats.
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Old 31-03-2017, 03:12 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On 31/03/2017 14:42, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:35:26 +0100, Nick Maclaren wrote:

In article ,
James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow
wrote:

They are frost resistant, not frost proof.

Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water
resistant". It's waterproof.


Oh, really? Are you sure that the m doesn't stand for milliseconds,
and it is the time it can be underwater before it starts to let in
water? Everyone I know of who has had an accident that tested the
waterproofness seriously has found that it wasn't ....


Bullshit. Myself and millions of others swim with their watches on.

Down to 100m?
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Old 31-03-2017, 04:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 15:03:09 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:42:27 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
wrote:

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:35:26 +0100, Nick Maclaren wrote:

In article ,
James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow wrote:

They are frost resistant, not frost proof.

Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water
resistant". It's waterproof.

Oh, really? Are you sure that the m doesn't stand for milliseconds,
and it is the time it can be underwater before it starts to let in
water? Everyone I know of who has had an accident that tested the
waterproofness seriously has found that it wasn't ....


Bullshit. Myself and millions of others swim with their watches on.


and dive, but not many dive to 100 metres.


I see no reason it would leak at that depth. The hardest part is making it waterproof at 1 metre.

--
Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. -- Oscar Wilde
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Old 31-03-2017, 04:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Plastic flowerpots

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 15:12:29 +0100, David wrote:

On 31/03/2017 14:42, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:35:26 +0100, Nick Maclaren wrote:

In article ,
James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 01:46:03 +0100, Yellow
wrote:

They are frost resistant, not frost proof.

Those words are used interchangeably. My watch is "100m water
resistant". It's waterproof.

Oh, really? Are you sure that the m doesn't stand for milliseconds,
and it is the time it can be underwater before it starts to let in
water? Everyone I know of who has had an accident that tested the
waterproofness seriously has found that it wasn't ....


Bullshit. Myself and millions of others swim with their watches on.

Down to 100m?


Someone has already asked that, do keep up.

--
Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. -- Oscar Wilde


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