Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 16-04-2017, 07:08 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2006
Posts: 25
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4" holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die back?

Thanks

  #2   Report Post  
Old 17-04-2017, 07:25 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,707
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.

--

Jeff
  #3   Report Post  
Old 17-04-2017, 08:27 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 805
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 17/04/2017 07:25, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.


Bluebells, the ultimate thug. Be careful what you wish for :-)
  #4   Report Post  
Old 17-04-2017, 02:15 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2006
Posts: 25
Default

Thanks! No they're English, my friend is a purist!

I agree they can get out of hand, but my garden isn't very big so I am used to keeping an eye on 'over-enthusiastic' spreading!
  #5   Report Post  
Old 19-04-2017, 10:21 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,364
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 17/04/2017 08:27, Stuart Noble wrote:
On 17/04/2017 07:25, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.


Bluebells, the ultimate thug. Be careful what you wish for :-)


I was going to say that! I would defy anyone to kill the wretched things

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rat buried on freshly dug allotment T James United Kingdom 4 17-04-2014 11:45 AM
Bees attracted to freshly-dug earth and sand - why? Mortimer[_2_] United Kingdom 13 17-07-2009 04:25 PM
Waiting period for a freshly, newly laid sod? Steve K. Lee Lawns 3 15-09-2006 01:54 AM
Freshly received flasks Geir Harris Hedemark Orchids 4 10-08-2003 01:12 AM
myth or fact? fertilizer to freshly transplanted tree Archimedes Plutonium Plant Science 3 05-05-2003 05:20 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017