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Old 13-08-2017, 11:09 AM
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Default Greenhouse Position

Hi there,

First post so please be kind. i'm not an avid gardener more an ethusiastic amature. I moved house a few months ago, in my old house i had a simple garden, lawn in the middle and some beds i used to grow fruit and vegatables in. However by the time i got an interest in gardening we already knew we'd out grown the house so there was no point considering things like greenhouses.

In the new house i have a reasonably large garden and i've been looking forward to having enough space to get a greenhouse.

However now im in the house i've realised that there really isn't a 'Good' position to put the greenhouse... im in the northwest of england.

The Garden is Northwest facing at the bottom of the garden there is a massive Mediterranean chestnut tree that blocks alot of light and shades the entire bottom portion of the garden. At the top of the garden is the house... the house is an old victorian house and that blocks the early morning light from the top half of the garden.

As the day goes on the sun moves from East to the West the light moves around the garden,

In the morning the middle portion of the west border gets full sun. (Upper and lower portions are in shade because of the house/tree)

In the middle of the day, the middle portion of east/west borders get direct light but again top and bottom do not.

Then at the end of the day the mid/top portion of the east border get light.

Unfortunately the only 'Practical spot' to place a greenhouse where it wouldn't be in the way or in the middle of the flower beds would be at the bottom of the garden beneath the tree which is clearly not going to work as that area gets no sunlight, infact even the grass struggles because it's deep shade.

The second spot is on the east wall at the top of the garden, unfortunately that is also a rubbish spot because again it really get's no direct light because of the house/6ft West wall.

Is there any point putting a greenhouse in a position that gets no/little direct sunlight? or should i write off the idea and stick to growing a few veggy's or is there anything i can do to improve the situation.

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Old 13-08-2017, 03:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,720
Default Greenhouse Position

On 13/08/17 11:09, leiela wrote:
Hi there,

First post so please be kind. i'm not an avid gardener more an
ethusiastic amature. I moved house a few months ago, in my old house i
had a simple garden, lawn in the middle and some beds i used to grow
fruit and vegatables in. However by the time i got an interest in
gardening we already knew we'd out grown the house so there was no point
considering things like greenhouses.

In the new house i have a reasonably large garden and i've been looking
forward to having enough space to get a greenhouse.

However now im in the house i've realised that there really isn't a
'Good' position to put the greenhouse... im in the northwest of
england.

The Garden is Northwest facing at the bottom of the garden there is a
massive Mediterranean chestnut tree that blocks alot of light and shades
the entire bottom portion of the garden. At the top of the garden is
the house... the house is an old victorian house and that blocks the
early morning light from the top half of the garden.

As the day goes on the sun moves from East to the West the light moves
around the garden,

In the morning the middle portion of the west border gets full sun.
(Upper and lower portions are in shade because of the house/tree)

In the middle of the day, the middle portion of east/west borders get
direct light but again top and bottom do not.

Then at the end of the day the mid/top portion of the east border get
light.

Unfortunately the only 'Practical spot' to place a greenhouse where it
wouldn't be in the way or in the middle of the flower beds would be at
the bottom of the garden beneath the tree which is clearly not going to
work as that area gets no sunlight, infact even the grass struggles
because it's deep shade.

The second spot is on the east wall at the top of the garden,
unfortunately that is also a rubbish spot because again it really get's
no direct light because of the house/6ft West wall.

Is there any point putting a greenhouse in a position that gets
no/little direct sunlight? or should i write off the idea and stick to
growing a few veggy's or is there anything i can do to improve the
situation.


Depending a good bit on what you were thinking of growing, a
partially-shaded greenhouse is probably ideal. Remember that many people
with greenhouses have to cover the roof glass with something to keep out
the worst of the intense sunlight which can burn some plants, or dry out
those in pots too quickly. See if you can find somewhere that the
early-morning sun can shine on the greenhouse and warm it quickly, but
later on it is shaded to prevent overheating. One other thing to
consider is whether or not you want an electric supply in the
greenhouse. The further you are from the house the more expensive it
will be to install.

There is also the question as to whether or not you want to grow things
in the greenhouse throughout the year, or just to prolong the growing
season at both ends.

--

Jeff
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Old 13-08-2017, 07:49 PM
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i've been watching the spot at the on the east facing wall at top of the garden today. it's been abit cloudy this afternoon so it's been hard to tell exactly how long and how much light it gets but it appears to be roughly the following.

Morning till 11am : mostly shade, not 'Deep shade' but there is a shadow from the house where i would want to pop the green house.

At around 11am the sun came over the top of the house and flooded the area with pretty much direct sunlight till about 2pm.

By 2pm the sun had moves west over the wall so the area started to go back into 'Shade' by about 4pm i would say that 50% of the depth of the greenhouse would be in shade but i do think i any plants in the front of the greenhouse would continue to get direct light untill about 5-6pm.

I don't think the light was really dark, most of that area of the garden is reasonably bright there simply isn't direct sunlight for very long.

I suspect i won't grow veg all year around, it's more about prologing the season, starting off things from seeds and growing a few bits and bobs that like things abit warmer than our summers tend to allow without help.

Really though i'll grow whatever the conditions allow.
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Old 13-08-2017, 10:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,719
Default Greenhouse Position

On 13/08/2017 19:49, leiela wrote:
i've been watching the spot at the on the east facing wall at top of the
garden today. it's been abit cloudy this afternoon so it's been hard to
tell exactly how long and how much light it gets but it appears to be
roughly the following.

Morning till 11am : mostly shade, not 'Deep shade' but there is a
shadow from the house where i would want to pop the green house.

At around 11am the sun came over the top of the house and flooded the
area with pretty much direct sunlight till about 2pm.

By 2pm the sun had moves west over the wall so the area started to go
back into 'Shade' by about 4pm i would say that 50% of the depth of the
greenhouse would be in shade but i do think i any plants in the front of
the greenhouse would continue to get direct light untill about 5-6pm.

I don't think the light was really dark, most of that area of the
garden is reasonably bright there simply isn't direct sunlight for very
long.

I suspect i won't grow veg all year around, it's more about prologing
the season, starting off things from seeds and growing a few bits and
bobs that like things abit warmer than our summers tend to allow without
help.

Really though i'll grow whatever the conditions allow.


Remember that the amount of sun varies over the year. You'll get more
sun for 3 months of the year (mid-May to now) and less sun for the other
9 months.

--
SRH

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Old 13-08-2017, 10:36 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 191
Default Greenhouse Position

On 13/08/2017 22:02, Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
On 13/08/2017 19:49, leiela wrote:
i've been watching the spot at the on the east facing wall at top of the
garden today. it's been abit cloudy this afternoon so it's been hard to
tell exactly how long and how much light it gets but it appears to be
roughly the following.

Morning till 11am : mostly shade, not 'Deep shade' but there is a
shadow from the house where i would want to pop the green house.

At around 11am the sun came over the top of the house and flooded the
area with pretty much direct sunlight till about 2pm.

By 2pm the sun had moves west over the wall so the area started to go
back into 'Shade' by about 4pm i would say that 50% of the depth of the
greenhouse would be in shade but i do think i any plants in the front of
the greenhouse would continue to get direct light untill about 5-6pm.

I don't think the light was really dark, most of that area of the
garden is reasonably bright there simply isn't direct sunlight for very
long.

I suspect i won't grow veg all year around, it's more about prologing
the season, starting off things from seeds and growing a few bits and
bobs that like things abit warmer than our summers tend to allow without
help.

Really though i'll grow whatever the conditions allow.


Remember that the amount of sun varies over the year. You'll get more
sun for 3 months of the year (mid-May to now) and less sun for the other
9 months.


I presume that by Mediteranian chestnut you mean sweet chestnut.
This tree will have no leaves during the winter so will be letting
almost all the light through (though you will have to remember there may
be twigs etc coming off the tree in high winds.
You should also give a thought to the orientation of the greenhouse,
East west catches the maximum midday sunshine where as North South
catches more of the morning and evening sunshine.
[email protected] sunny side of Swansea Bay


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Old 13-08-2017, 11:10 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,376
Default Greenhouse Position

On 13/08/2017 11:09, leiela wrote:
Hi there,

First post so please be kind. i'm not an avid gardener more an
ethusiastic amature. I moved house a few months ago, in my old house i
had a simple garden, lawn in the middle and some beds i used to grow
fruit and vegatables in. However by the time i got an interest in
gardening we already knew we'd out grown the house so there was no point
considering things like greenhouses.

In the new house i have a reasonably large garden and i've been looking
forward to having enough space to get a greenhouse.

However now im in the house i've realised that there really isn't a
'Good' position to put the greenhouse... im in the northwest of
england.

The Garden is Northwest facing at the bottom of the garden there is a
massive Mediterranean chestnut tree that blocks alot of light and shades
the entire bottom portion of the garden. At the top of the garden is
the house... the house is an old victorian house and that blocks the
early morning light from the top half of the garden.

As the day goes on the sun moves from East to the West the light moves
around the garden,

In the morning the middle portion of the west border gets full sun.
(Upper and lower portions are in shade because of the house/tree)

In the middle of the day, the middle portion of east/west borders get
direct light but again top and bottom do not.

Then at the end of the day the mid/top portion of the east border get
light.

Unfortunately the only 'Practical spot' to place a greenhouse where it
wouldn't be in the way or in the middle of the flower beds would be at
the bottom of the garden beneath the tree which is clearly not going to
work as that area gets no sunlight, infact even the grass struggles
because it's deep shade.

The second spot is on the east wall at the top of the garden,
unfortunately that is also a rubbish spot because again it really get's
no direct light because of the house/6ft West wall.

Is there any point putting a greenhouse in a position that gets
no/little direct sunlight? or should i write off the idea and stick to
growing a few veggy's or is there anything i can do to improve the
situation.




I have a number of greenhouse at various positions around the garden,
direct sun can be something of a mixed blessing and I find the
greehouses that have good light (ie no overhead shading) but are in
shadow for chunks of the day are the best for a whole range of growing.
I always line mine with a layer of horticultural grade bubble wrap, more
for defusing the sunlight than keeping things warm in winter.

In my view a badly sited greehouse is a lot better than no greenhouse!

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk


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