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Old 16-07-2018, 11:12 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Recommendations for long border.

I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.
I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials for
colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas for
stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in Autumn or
Spring as appropriate would be ideal.
I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it, dwarf
rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already but they
are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of Berberis but that is
vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is probably going to be mainly me
maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker


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Old 17-07-2018, 02:05 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 20
Default Recommendations for long border.

On Mon, 16 Jul 2018 23:12:16 +0100, "Andy Parker"
wrote:

I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.
I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials for
colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas for
stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in Autumn or
Spring as appropriate would be ideal.
I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it, dwarf
rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already but they
are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of Berberis but that is
vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is probably going to be mainly me
maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker



I would have suggested Berberis, Gorse and Mahonia as evergreen, but somewhat
obnoxious plants, but that sounds like it's out.. Is it too late to raise
Heuchera, Potentilla and Astilbe as under-plantings?

Mark Rand
--
Rugby, Warwickshire.
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Old 17-07-2018, 11:34 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Recommendations for long border.

On 16/07/2018 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East
or ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.


Nothing wrong with clay it can be a very fertile soil. Mine is.

I find a border only 1m wide a PITA if there is a grass edging.

Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big
anniversary event.


Low maintainence, evergreen and looking OK this time next year from
planting now is quite a tall order at a sensible price.

I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials
for colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas
for stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in
Autumn or Spring as appropriate would be ideal.


Sun flowers, sweet peas, foxgloves and castor oil plants will give you
big impressive plants from seed (assuming you have a greenhouse). Some
of them are rather poisonous so you might want to consider that.

Perennial perpetual sweet pea is quite good at climbing up fences and
can take care of itself reasonably well. Teasels will also be statuesque
but might be thuggish if they like the conditions.

Hydrangeas will do OK if it is damp enough. Ferns are also not bad for
the maintenance free bit. Junipers and the like but be careful you don't
end up with any conifers that grow excessively big.

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it,
dwarf rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already
but they are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of
Berberis but that is vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is
probably going to be mainly me maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker


70m is a lot of border. I hope you get some help for your project!

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 17-07-2018, 12:57 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Recommendations for long border.

In article ,
Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.


Bluntly, you will need to sow annuals - nothing else will establish by
next July. For the slightly longer term, consider Aubretia for ground
cover (to be overgrown as shrubs mature). I don't have experience of
clay in Cumbria, and the plants that grow well we me (sand in Cambridge)
will not do with you.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 17-07-2018, 03:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,956
Default Recommendations for long border.

On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.


Does that mean sea level as on the coast, or sea level inland? It would
make quite a difference in Cumbria, as many more plants that would not
survive the cold inland would do so on or near the coast. But wind and
salt spray would be a factor to consider on the coast.

As in many other cases, have a look around in other gardens nearby to
see what is growing well, and what is not. That should give you an idea
as to what plants you would be wasting your time (and money!) on trying
to establish, and what might be worth a go.

--

Jeff


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Old 17-07-2018, 05:41 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 191
Default Recommendations for long border.

On 17/07/2018 15:22, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.


Does that mean sea level as on the coast, or sea level inland? It would
make quite a difference in Cumbria, as many more plants that would not
survive the cold inland would do so on or near the coast. But wind and
salt spray would be a factor to consider on the coast.

As in many other cases, have a look around in other gardens nearby to
see what is growing well, and what is not. That should give you an idea
as to what plants you would be wasting your time (and money!) on trying
to establish, and what might be worth a go.


I'm on fairly heavy clay (which is beginning to fracture like brick in
the heat). The foolproof things that can take care of themselves and are
not too invasive I think he might stand a chance with include:

Cornus
Euphorbias
Buddleia
Honeysuckle
Sedum Spectabile
Paeony Rose

Lavender does OK for me in N Yorks but is tetchy about drainage.

Valerian, Centranthus ruber, is a bit of a thug. But good for
butterflies. It might be high maintenance keeping it under control.
(OK so long as you keep dead heading but seeds profusely)

Depends a bit on budget and what plants can be obtained as cuttings from
friends and family and other volunteers.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old 17-07-2018, 06:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Recommendations for long border.



"Mark Rand" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 16 Jul 2018 23:12:16 +0100, "Andy Parker"
wrote:

I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.
I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials for
colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas
for
stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in Autumn or
Spring as appropriate would be ideal.
I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it,
dwarf
rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already but
they
are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of Berberis but that
is
vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is probably going to be mainly me
maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker



I would have suggested Berberis, Gorse and Mahonia as evergreen, but
somewhat
obnoxious plants, but that sounds like it's out.. Is it too late to raise
Heuchera, Potentilla and Astilbe as under-plantings?

Mark Rand
--
Rugby, Warwickshire.

I don't know but I'll look them up and thanks for the suggestions.
Andy

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Old 17-07-2018, 06:50 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Recommendations for long border.



"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message news
In article ,
Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.


Bluntly, you will need to sow annuals - nothing else will establish by
next July. For the slightly longer term, consider Aubretia for ground
cover (to be overgrown as shrubs mature). I don't have experience of
clay in Cumbria, and the plants that grow well we me (sand in Cambridge)
will not do with you.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.

Good point, thanks, I'll plan for that, thanks
Andy

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Old 17-07-2018, 06:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Recommendations for long border.



"Martin Brown" wrote in message news
On 16/07/2018 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East or
ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.


Nothing wrong with clay it can be a very fertile soil. Mine is.

I find a border only 1m wide a PITA if there is a grass edging.

Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big anniversary
event.


Low maintainence, evergreen and looking OK this time next year from
planting now is quite a tall order at a sensible price.

I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials for
colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas
for stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in
Autumn or Spring as appropriate would be ideal.


Sun flowers, sweet peas, foxgloves and castor oil plants will give you
big impressive plants from seed (assuming you have a greenhouse). Some
of them are rather poisonous so you might want to consider that.

Perennial perpetual sweet pea is quite good at climbing up fences and
can take care of itself reasonably well. Teasels will also be statuesque
but might be thuggish if they like the conditions.

Hydrangeas will do OK if it is damp enough. Ferns are also not bad for
the maintenance free bit. Junipers and the like but be careful you don't
end up with any conifers that grow excessively big.

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it,
dwarf rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already
but they are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of Berberis
but that is vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is probably going to
be mainly me maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker


70m is a lot of border. I hope you get some help for your project!

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

I thought it may be a tall order, thanks for the suggestions, I hope I get
some help as well! Have to make sure there's a brew facility on the works
trains.
Andy

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Old 17-07-2018, 09:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 252
Default Recommendations for long border.

On 16/07/2018 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East
or ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big
anniversary event.
I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials
for colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas
for stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in
Autumn or Spring as appropriate would be ideal.
I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it,
dwarf rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already
but they are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of
Berberis but that is vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is
probably going to be mainly me maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker



I would sow the entire border with autumn sown annuals, then plant
through with what ever you chose, that way what ever happens you will
have a show.


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Old 17-07-2018, 10:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 215
Default Recommendations for long border.


On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.



Hydrangea,
rugosa roses
crocosmia
libertia
fuchsia Mrs Popple

Any local garden where the above grow, will have spares.
You might ask a local garden club's members to help out with home-
propagated plants.

Janet.


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Old 19-07-2018, 10:28 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Recommendations for long border.



"Jeff Layman" wrote in message news
On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.


Does that mean sea level as on the coast, or sea level inland? It would
make quite a difference in Cumbria, as many more plants that would not
survive the cold inland would do so on or near the coast. But wind and
salt spray would be a factor to consider on the coast.

As in many other cases, have a look around in other gardens nearby to
see what is growing well, and what is not. That should give you an idea
as to what plants you would be wasting your time (and money!) on trying
to establish, and what might be worth a go.

--

Jeff

About 5 mikes from the sea so no salt spray but definitely a maritime
climate.
The problem for me in looking round gardens is that with a very few
exceptions unless it has a label on it I don't know what I am looking at!
Andy

Sorry for the delay, my news server vanished!
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Old 19-07-2018, 10:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Recommendations for long border.



"Martin Brown" wrote in message news
On 17/07/2018 15:22, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.


I'm on fairly heavy clay (which is beginning to fracture like brick in
the heat). The foolproof things that can take care of themselves and are
not too invasive I think he might stand a chance with include:

Cornus
Euphorbias
Buddleia
Honeysuckle
Sedum Spectabile
Paeony Rose

Lavender does OK for me in N Yorks but is tetchy about drainage.

Valerian, Centranthus ruber, is a bit of a thug. But good for
butterflies. It might be high maintenance keeping it under control.
(OK so long as you keep dead heading but seeds profusely)

Depends a bit on budget and what plants can be obtained as cuttings from
friends and family and other volunteers.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

I do like a list! Thank you Martin, I have dogwood and Buddleia promised and
will look up the others. I suspect Honeysuckle might be a bit rampant for my
situation.
Budget is the killer, concentrating on what I can scrounge and produce from
cuttings at the moment.
Andy

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Old 19-07-2018, 10:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Recommendations for long border.



"Janet" wrote in message
t...


On 16/07/18 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:

I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.



Hydrangea,
rugosa roses
crocosmia
libertia
fuchsia Mrs Popple

Any local garden where the above grow, will have spares.
You might ask a local garden club's members to help out with home-
propagated plants.

Janet.

Thank you for the list Janet, I'd love a shrub Fuchsia or two, I've only
treat them like annuals so far. I haven't found a local gardening club yet
and have just missed the open garden weekend.
Andy

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Old 19-07-2018, 10:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Recommendations for long border.



"David" wrote in message ...

On 16/07/2018 23:12, Andy Parker wrote:
I have a project to plant up a "border" 70 metres long and about a metre
wide in an area of a public park that our Society lease. It faces East
or ENE and is backed by a 3 foot retaining wall and railings above that.
Soil is due to be tipped there shortly but it looks more like clay to me.
Ideally the border will be at least partially evergreen, under 3 metres
tall, low maintenance and look OK next July when we have a big
anniversary event.
I'm no gardener although I aspire to improve.
I envisage mainly shrubs and hardy annuals with herbacious perennials
for colour?
As usual with these things the budget is two thirds of sod all so ideas
for stuff I can bring on at home from cuttings etc. and plant out in
Autumn or Spring as appropriate would be ideal.
I'm in Cumbria almost at sea level.
I will put in Forsythia because I have fond childhood memories of it,
dwarf rhododendron 'cos I have some. There is a nice cotoneaster already
but they are quite slow growing I suspect. The park has a lot of
Berberis but that is vicious and I'd rather avoid it since it is
probably going to be mainly me maintaining this.

Suggestions please.

Andy Parker



I would sow the entire border with autumn sown annuals, then plant
through with what ever you chose, that way what ever happens you will
have a show.

Genius !
Andy


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